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All Jacked Up, the New and Improved Handlebar Jack v.3

Handlebar Jack v3 on cobblestone(Photo/Handlebar Jack)
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Back again with a better version of the OG, the new Handlebar Jack version 3 has some additional features to help make trail-side repairs easier than ever. Quite simply, the Handlebar Jack is a simple, no-nonsense way to tackle trailside repairs that won’t cost you an arm and a leg.

Handlebar Jack v3 in use
(Photo/Handlebar Jack)

The most common way to repair a flat tire is to flip the bike upside down. I mean, we’ve been doing this since we were kids, right? With some of the new cockpit accessories, ebike controls, computer mounts, or maybe just your favorite bell, the simple solution just got less simple.

That’s where this clever tool comes into play. Let’s see what version 3 offers.

What’s New with v3?

Handlebar Jack v3 ribbed cradle

Enhanced Grip

They’ve made significant changes to the cradle area, where the bar meets the Jack on the v3. Adding rubber “ribs” to that area means an enhanced grip, meaning more stability and security ensuring that your bike stays put while performing the repair or maintenance.

Handlebar Jack v3 thicker straps

Thicker Strap

This new and improved v3 now comes with a thicker strap, adding to the durability of the Handlebar Jack, even during the toughest use.

Handlebar Jack v3 more height

Increased Height

Version 3’s taller height of a full 3.7″ of clearance is the same height as the previous version while using the optional extender. This gives you more height without carrying extra components, helping keep the bike’s cockpit vitals off the ground.

Handlebar Jack v3 Retail

Retail: $38.95

Handlebar Jack v3 the set

The Original Handlebar jack v3 is sold as a set. Two Jacks are included in the set.

HandleBarJack.com

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17 Comments
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Fig Ciocc
Fig Ciocc
4 months ago

People hate it but upside down is the best way to work on a bike if you don’t have a stand. Not a great option on the road side for a flat because the bike is asymmetric in weight and has a tendency to fall on the derailleur hanger with a gust of wind. But professional cat four masters races snobs are so funny about this. I’ve seen Cat 1s and Domestic pros do this to adjust derailleurs before races and it works perfectly.

Pat Patterson
Pat Patterson
4 months ago
Reply to  Fig Ciocc

In my experience , most cat 1s/domestic pros know less about working on their own bikes than pretty much anyone else.

Upside down is not the best option. Even with this product, any weight toward the rear of the bike will cause the headset to pivot and the bike to tip. Additionally, it’s just difficult to adjust with everything being upside down. My go to is to find a tree branch, mailbox post, or anything I can hang the saddle from. If I can’t find anything, I just make small adjustments, then hold the rear of the bike up with one hand, and pedal with the other to test.

FrenchPress
FrenchPress
4 months ago

What a dumb product.

tim
tim
4 months ago
Reply to  FrenchPress

Why? What am I missing? Granted, sure, an Honest-to-Goodness bike stand works better but not everyone can afford a bike stand. Looks useful for travel too.

Dolan Halbrook
Dolan Halbrook
4 months ago

I could see this being super useful for loaded bike touring, where you may need to do a pretty involved repair a long ways from any shop, and where grams don’t matter at all.

Angstrom
Angstrom
4 months ago
Reply to  Dolan Halbrook

One set in a group of riders might make sense. For a solo rider, probably not as attractive.

Mike
Mike
4 months ago
Reply to  Angstrom

Bar ends are primed to make a comeback

Kool Stop Tyre Lever Sales Dept.
Kool Stop Tyre Lever Sales Dept.
4 months ago
Reply to  Dolan Halbrook

A double legged kickstand on on touring bike, easy parking and easy repairs,
and you don’t have turn a loaded bike upside down.
Maybe Tune can produce the the first fru fru double legged stand it 3d printed TI
and recycled carbon tubes ?

Tom Wenzel
4 months ago

It’s missing a third leg–there is no way my saddle is touching the ground.

Zach Overholt
Admin
4 months ago
Reply to  Tom Wenzel

The Saddle Jack is sold separately.

Tom Wenzel
4 months ago
Reply to  Zach Overholt

Omg, and I thought I was merely joking. πŸ™‚

Julia Sommer
Julia Sommer
4 months ago
Reply to  Tom Wenzel

Handlebar Jack also has a product for this: it’s called the Saddle Jack. They’re on sale all month.

Daft Vaper
Daft Vaper
4 months ago

I usually hook the nose of my saddle over a tree branch. Granted, not an option everywhere.

Anonymous
Anonymous
4 months ago

And people call me fussy for bringing some small rags to lay on the ground before flipping my bike.

Former academic
Former academic
4 months ago

Most grips, bar tapes, and hoods cost less than this. How many flats are you really fixing upside down, and if so, maybe reconsider some life choices-

Dougie Fresh
Dougie Fresh
4 months ago

I can’t imagine carrying these on a ride. Maybe keep them in the car for last minute repairs? On a road tour with panniers, the bike can be worked on while on its side, resting on the paneers. An unloaded bike can be hung from a low branch by its saddle. Lots of bike racks also double as a repair stand. I can hang mine from my velocirax leaned back and tune the drivetrain.

Vegas
Vegas
4 months ago

Is it April 1st already?

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