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All-new Fox Transfer dropper gets 2 coatings, 2 routings, 3 travels & infinite adjustment

2017 Fox Transfer dropper seatpost
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With so many brands coming out with dropper seatposts these days, one has to ask “What makes your special?” With the new Fox Transfer, turns out quite a bit.

The design is a complete departure from the original Fox D.O.S.S., which is immediately recognizable from the outside thanks to both stealth routing and a new, low-mount external routing option. Gone is the top, saddle-clamp cable mount. You’ll also notice both Kashima and black coatings. And the lever, which has two options, is more refined, too. But like good relationships, what’s really important is what’s on the inside…

2017 Fox Transfer dropper seatpost

To make the post user-friendly, the cable attachment is fixed at the lever and puts the “end” at the post, letting you quickly pull it out and disconnect if you need to remove the post.

2017 Fox Transfer dropper seatpost

Inside, Fox eschewed the traditional drop-in cartridge in favor of building the hydraulic system directly into the upper tube. That allowed for more room, which means more fluid, which allows for lower pressures. The benefit is lighter lever feel, which is compounded by the additional mechanical leverage designed into the cable interface on the post. The result is an easy-to-depress lever that lets you finely control the speed and amount of drop or rise. (Images above: Stealth dropper internals shown at top, external on bottom.)

2017 Fox Transfer dropper seatpost

Push the thumb lever and the cable’s mechanism depresses the Push Rod into the Spool Valve. Glide Bands inside the Spool Valve sit below the upper flow port, blocking fluid movement, until you push the lever to move the Glide Band past the valve and open flow. This lets fluid move from either side of the Main Piston, which allows gravity and your weight to push the post down, or nitrogen at the bottom of the post (behind the IFP) to push it back up.

Another unique feature is the Pressure Relief Valve, which lets the system equalize pressure between the two sides. It’s mainly to adjust for temperature and altitude changes that could cause pressure differentials, but also in the odd event that your post is loaded with a massive, instant force. Fox’s technical marketing rep told us the chances you ever noticing anything happening with the PRV is virtually nil, but it’s there as a precaution. No, it does not mean the post will sink into its travel if you land hard while sitting.

2017 Fox Transfer dropper seatpost

The post will come in 30.9 and 31.6 diameters and get 4″ (100mm), 5″ (125mm) and 6″ (150mm) travel options. All are infinitely adjustable within their travel range – no more stepped/fixed drop increments.

2017 Fox Transfer dropper seatpost

Two remotes will be offered, sold a la carte. So, pick your post, then pick your remote, they won’t ship with each other. The remote on the left is the 1x version, designed to mount under your handlebar on the left side only, basically replacing the front shifter. On the right is the 2x/3x remote, which can mount on either side of the bar, with lever facing up or down. Its cable noodle rotates to maintain smooth cable runs. Both versions have an inline barrel adjuster, and both will sell for $65.

2017 Fox Transfer dropper seatpost

The posts will be offered in Factory Kashima ($314) and Performance ($264) with the black anodized upper tube. Other than the stanchion coating, the posts are identical.

2017 Fox Transfer dropper seatpost

A two-bolt saddle clamp that looks an awful lot like a Thomson seatpost clamp allows for easy saddle angle adjustments. Available now.

RideFox.com

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30 Comments
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norcom
norcom
6 years ago

Hopefully this will finally be rebuildable. One of my DOSS posts failed, I’m sure the other one will at some point as well.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago
Reply to  norcom

Do you know what actually failed?

norcom
norcom
6 years ago
Reply to  norcom

Something inside started grinding. There were metal flakes coming out of the schrader valve. I removed the piece with the valve and there were even more flakes. It was still working but making a grinding noise. Fox “rebuilt” (replaced) it for $90+s/h. Which is pretty much what they were blowing them out for at the end of its life. They just sent me a new one and didn’t even bother with the old one. I cut the old one in half to figure out how to disassemble it. Couldn’t figure out how to get the top part off. Turns out the rubber seal is pressed in EXTREMELY hard and that’s what’s holding it all in. Just need to actuate the release mechanism and pull very hard to get the stanchion out.

This new post having nitrogen in it is definitely not user serviceable. No thanks Fox. I’ll stick to my 7+ year old Gravity Droppers that has outlasted through MULTIPLE other posts I’ve killed: KS/Specialized/Fox

Michael
Michael
6 years ago

What are the total lengths for each size? Fox does not list them.

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago

If only there was an offset clamp!

Matt
Matt
6 years ago

Right now riding Reverb 170mm with Novyparts lever. This is the best possible setup you can buy right now. No question about it.

Mark
Mark
6 years ago

Forgive my ignorance, but I’m not fully understanding the point of a dropper post. I do mainly gravel and some CC and road training, I have a few USE suspension posts from years ago, and frankly am disappointed that suspension posts have not gotten more R&D love over the years, can a dropper post also provide suspension? If not, why not? Is it just a benefit to DH guys to get the seat out of the way? Just trying to figure out why I would want one. Thanks in advance.

Chase
Chase
6 years ago
Reply to  Mark

Mark-Dropper post are for descending,cornering and climbing.
I drop my post for:
Descending-to get back and lower CG
Cornering-I drop it 2-3 inches to lower CG for high speed corners
Climbing- Drop it when resting on a climb. Lower seat to get on , clip in a pedal and start up under power, then stand and raise it and clip in other pedal. Makes remounting on slopes really easy and simple. No more tipping side to side and trying to lean into bike as pedal starts down.
Climbing-If I need to power out of saddle, I sometimes drop the saddle to get the nose out of the way as I climb.
Seriously , dropper post and 1X are 2 of the top 5 greatest innovations in MTB riding ever.

Groghunter
Groghunter
6 years ago

$264 MSRP is actually eminently reasonable for something with this level of design & (assumedly) QA. That’s pretty impressive, FOX.

i
i
6 years ago
Reply to  Groghunter

keep in mind, that’s SRP without the lever, which every other post on the market includes. Still reasonable, but actual price is $65 higher.

Kashima is a pretty steep extra for something Fox previously said is of no benefit. I guess those guys that have to match it to their fork will pay for it.

I’m hoping my LEV holds out long enough for someone else to put these through the wringer. They look really good on paper, but reliability; there’s no way to know just yet.

Groghunter
Groghunter
6 years ago
Reply to  i

All good points. Also, FOX may talk up putting the cable end at the post, but one effect of that is you’re locked into buying their lever. Considering how good some of the other levers on the market are( like the Specialized SRL, or converting an old front shifter) that’s a pretty big downside.

Ol'shel'
Ol'shel'
6 years ago
Reply to  i

Every 1x rider can grab one of their old front shifters and mod it for dropper use…

i
i
6 years ago
Reply to  Ol'shel'

not really, as Groghunter said, the anchor end of the cable is in the post. Unless you can figure a way to weld another end on your cable, you’ll have to do a little more redneck engineering to make that work.

C
C
6 years ago
Reply to  i

Totally it was smart of KS Lew to change their dropper actuation so you can around as they used to do what Fox have done here but their actually looks just like KS its just that KS includes a little bolt you attach the cable to that rest that looks similar to what Fox calls a cable bushing.

Mike
Mike
6 years ago
Reply to  i

Does anyone know
If the KS southpaw remote would be compatible? It’s half the price and is more adjustable.

Ólafur Jens Ólafsson (@olijay)

$264! Is it just me or is this one of the cheapest droppers out there?

Bikeryder85
Bikeryder85
6 years ago

This is really impressive…really surprised at the price

dustytires
6 years ago

Andrew I think that few offer offset seat clamps on dropper posts due to the binding of the system, I used to hope for it, but now I see how hard it is to drop my post if I am sitting towards the back of the seat but if I slip forward on the seat to push down it goes easier. With a offset clamp it might not move at all. This price is insane for Fox quality! Mark you really need to get out from under your rock and look at what is going on for cornering styles and even race course design as a few of the World Cup XC racers are even riding droppers the courses can be so challenging and the benefits of a dropper must be worth the weight.

Fred Vitale
Fred Vitale
6 years ago
Reply to  dustytires

Don’t be harsh on Mark, some riders live in places where the closest good singletrack is over 100 miles away.

Larsv
Larsv
6 years ago

@ Groghunte: ‘hate to spoil the party, but it reads like that price is without the remote… adding another $69 to the cost.

@Mark: a dropper might seem unnecessary or even decadent, in fact it’s considered as one of the big innovations of the last few years.

It allows you to lower and raise your saddle instantlye during your ride and that adds both playfullness and safety to the ride.
Playfullness as in: Lowering your saddle before a few tight turns makes it easier to swing the bike from left to ride beneath you, adding speed and fun.
Safety as in: You can lower your center of gravity for steep descents feeling more secure.

Even if you ride in modestly hilly terrain, you’ll probably like it once you’ve tried. 🙂

Chase
Chase
6 years ago

My KS Lev’s are working very well. But this would be my next post when I need a new one.

paquo
paquo
6 years ago

my crank bros joplin worked great, for a few months. The hydraulic infinite adjust was nice. I put on a basic lightweight carbon post and haven’t gone back, for those sketchy off camber descending hairpins it would be nice to drop down though

Brent
Brent
6 years ago

how much does it weigh?? and yes i know im missing the point.

adps
adps
6 years ago
Reply to  Brent

517gr
its also the lightest post.

Bill
Bill
6 years ago
Reply to  adps

I suspect that weight is without the remote and cable. But KS carbon post is lighter, and the LEV integras run pretty close.

connell
connell
6 years ago

If you do not understand the benefit of a dropper post, you are slow in the corners. Lowering your center of gravity improves handling and corner speed. I have been racing XC for over 5 yrs using a reverb drop post. Best upgrade you can do.People worried about the 3/4 lb added weight are clueless.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago
Reply to  connell

And one could argue that if you need a dropper on most XC race courses, you are slow, and have generally bad technique.

No reason to belittle people that may not understand what a dropper is useful for. As one poster said, he only rides road and some cx. I use a dropper but would say on many trails it is superfluous so I can see why people would question what they are for.

bob
bob
6 years ago
Reply to  JBikes

Not to mention its specially useful for steep descents, not “cornering” as it ler you shift your weight around
(deleted)

Tony B
6 years ago

Let’s take it easy on Mark here guys. He did say, “forgive my ignorance”.

I get annoyed with the guys who will say you don’t need a dropper, or they’ve been riding for X amount of years and never needed one, etc, etc.

Yeah, ok buddy, droppers are just another marketing fad, right?

Mark, yes there is at least one dropper post that has suspension built into it. It’s a KS Exaform, and I have one on my Surly Pugsley fatbike. I think it’s great for that bike!

Please don’t ask why anyone would need a fatbike…

rgeniec
rgeniec
6 years ago

Leave it to Fox to charge extra for an included item like a remote.

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