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New Parlee Ouray goes Nude w/ Monocoque All-Road Bike

2024 parlee ouray all-road endurance bike with monocoque frame
13 Comments

The all-new Parlee Ouray brings a lot of firsts for the Massachusetts brand, replacing the Altum as their all-road endurance bike with a freshly modern rig.

The Ouray (pronounced “yur-ay”) is their first with a dramatically sloping top tube, their first production monocoque frame, and their first to come out of a new partner factory in Europe. And, it’s their first to offer a rare nude waxed finish that shows off their craftsmanship, layer by layer.

A monocoque design that shows their work

closeup details of parley ouray all-road bike

The Ouray is made in small batches as a one-piece, monocoque frame. This gives Parlee complete control over the ride quality since there are no joints or tubes bonded together. It’s all one-piece, straight out of the mold.

Parlee carefully places all layers in the mold such that they come out perfectly aligned, with zero wrinkles or imperfections. That outer layer is functional, too – there are no cosmetic carbon layers done for show.

closeup details of parley ouray all-road bike

Few other builders pull this off, and none that we know of do it at production scale. There’s no filler, bonding, overwrap, or other finishing required that would hide the carbon fiber, what you see is how it comes out of the mold.

Rightfully, Parlee is quite proud of it, so they’re offering the bikes with a nude carbon finish, sold with a durable wax coating to protect it. They say this adds just a couple of grams to the frame, compared to 100g or more for paint. They use a standard 303 Aerospace wax, available online and through most marine suppliers, that’s easy to apply – just wipe it on with a clean cloth once or twice a year as needed.

If you must, the Parlee #PAINTLAB will custom paint it or apply a tinted clearcoat that shows off the fiber while adding a hint of color.

Inspired by America’s Swiss Alps

2024 parlee ouray all-road endurance bike shown from front angle

The inspiration for the Ouray’s ride was the town of Ouray, CO, in the San Juan Mountains. With endless miles of perfect, curvy, mountainous roads, epic scenery, and countless off-pavement backroads to explore, it’s the bike for riders who want to ride it all.

The sloping top tube, dropped stays, taller stack, and shorter reach give it a modern endurance bike feel. Combined with up to 700x38mm tires, and it’s made for comfortable cruising all day.

2024 parlee ouray all-road endurance bike shown from rear angle

But it’s still a Parlee. Drop the hammer and it reacts as it should thanks to a stout BB section and angular downtube feeding into the head tube to keep it all laterally and torsionally stiff when you’re cranking toward the summit.

The downtube’s shaping is also inspired by their RZ7 aero bike’s Recurve aero tube profiles, giving it a slight aerodynamic edge. But, Parlee says the main aero feature of this bike is the completely concealed brake hose routing courtesy of the integrated cockpit.

Specs & Details

closeup details of parley ouray all-road bike

The Ouray uses all the best modern standards, including a T47 bottom bracket…

closeup details of parley ouray all-road bike

…UDH rear hanger…

closeup details of parley ouray all-road bike

…and widely compatible internal routing system. Choose from PRO, FSA, ENVE, Deda, Token, and other popular integrated cockpit setups, they should all fit.

closeup details of parley ouray all-road bike

The headtube fits traditional handlebars and stems, too, with room for headsets using external ports for brake hoses. The frame is only compatible with wireless/semi-wireless electronic drivetrains, though. The front derailleur mount can be covered with an included “blanking panel” for 1x setups.

closeup details of parley ouray all-road bike

The bikes use a standard 31.6mm round seatpost.

The front brake mount is sized for a minimum 160mm rotor, which lets you size up to 180mm without adding spacers or additional adapters. Parlee says bigger riders or those riding long, steep descents are opting for bigger front rotors, and this makes it easy.

All complete bikes will ship with 160mm rotors front and rear. The rear brake mount keeps standard bolt placements, letting you easily size down to 140mm if you want.

Ouray Geometry & Pricing

The Ouray comes in five stock sizes, each coming with standard and tall headset caps. The latter lets you increase the stack height further without resorting to a ton of spacers under the stem.

Framesets start at $5,299, with Frame Kits also available that include cockpit components. Complete bikes are offered with a full range of SRAM and Shimano groups. All bikes are sold through a dealer and include a basic fitting to determine frame size and component dimensions.

Complete bikes include no-cost customization, letting you choose crank length, bar width, stem length, seat, and seatpost setback. You can also substitute wheels, tires, drivetrain, and other accessories to get the exact build you want.

ParleeCycles.com

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Rim Brake enjoyer
Rim Brake enjoyer
1 month ago

Off topic note but if you’re in Durango and make the trip up the million dollar highway don’t just stop at Silverton like most tourists do. Go a little further and stop in Ouray. Way better and more scenic little town to get something to eat and the views are a lot better.

Jef
Jef
1 month ago

Between this, the new ENVE, and a few others there’s a lot of incredible, top-shelf choices without being too “raced out”.

Andreas
Andreas
1 month ago

T47 internal. not T47 which means nothing. thanks

Eggs Benedict
Eggs Benedict
1 month ago
Reply to  Andreas

How many types/variations of T47 are there?

Eggsy
Eggsy
1 month ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

3 + trek non-standard T47i-ish

Oliver
Oliver
1 month ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

Main ones are T47-68 internal (worst one), T47-86.5 external (second worst), T47-85.5 external (best one). Bunch of other weird and asymmetric stuff.

Oliver
Oliver
1 month ago
Reply to  Oliver

I put internal and external the wrong way round. 68 is external. 86.5 / 85.5 are internal.

Angstrom
Angstrom
1 month ago

I like the geometry for normal humans, but I don’t understand why Parlee uses the unusual(for road)31.6 seatpost size. It greatly reduces the aftermarket options.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
28 days ago
Reply to  Angstrom

Shims are cheap. They have have done it for more options for weirdos using dropper posts on road bikes?

Justin Walsh
Justin Walsh
1 month ago

This bike looks amazing in person.

Rob
Rob
29 days ago

Meh, I don’t know, I used to like Parlee but this just looks like anything bland or open mold. There’s no wow factor in the design or super light weight etc. Not even USA made for a USA company. I guess the only wow detail is the tidy layup but there’s also a lot of bikes with cool paint.

qillie
qillie
29 days ago
Reply to  Rob

we can also see the carbon wraps on the design to patch up. I don’t think bikerumor understands what monocoque means, and perhaps neither Parlee, which, for that price, is not excusable:

Monocoque, other than sounding french, means the skin is the structure (the “coque i.e. shell”) so nearly ALL carbon bikes are actually monocoque because they have no internal struts, they’re hollow. The skin is the structure.

I think that what they mean here is that they didn’t do a 2 piece mold that they then wrap together. This is harder to do, but not necessarily better. what is better is when you do not need to patch up the carbon when it’s one single perfect layup rather than pieces of carbon cloth wrapped on top. This makes for a stronger result for the weight basically.

Now, they carbon still does look beautiful.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
28 days ago
Reply to  Rob

There never was wow factor beyond their company story and production location

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