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OneUp Components Switch puts a new twist on ultra-fast chainring swaps

OneUp Components Switch quick change 1x mountain bike chainrings for SRAM
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OneUp Components Switch quick change 1x mountain bike chainrings for SRAM Race Face Cinch Cannondale and e13

You could make the argument (or joke) that we used to have a front derailleur for such things as changing gears, sure, but that’d miss the point. Single chainrings have made our bikes lighter and simpler, and the accompanying wide range cassettes eliminated any drawbacks. Then, direct mount cranksets made any remaining chainring swaps relatively easy considering the infrequency with which you’re likely to do it.

But, let’s say you want the holy grail of a 1x’s lightweight and the ability to quickly change chainrings. There are a couple options out there, but the new OneUp Switch makes it so fast and easy, you might find yourself tweaking the gearing before every ride…

This video shows just how quick and easy it is to change out a ring…except that you do actually have to loosen all four bolts. Here’s the deal: OneUp Components has been working on Switch for almost two years, and even teased it on Instagram last summer. The design has changed since then to make it more user-friendly, most notably by accessing the bolts from the outside. To loosen the chainring, you simply use a 4mm allen wrench to loosen each bolt by two complete turns…you don’t need to remove the bolts. Then twist the chainring forward 20º and slide it over the crank arm.

OneUp Components Switch quick change 1x mountain bike chainrings for SRAM Race Face Cinch Cannondale and e13

The center carriers are available for SRAM, Race Face Cinch, e13, Hope and Cannondale. Most options come in standard, Boost and Super Boost spacing. Yes, and sorry, but Super Boost (aka 157mm thru axles) are going to be a thing. They attach to the chainrings with standard chainring bolts, so you should be able to find a replacement at any bike shop. Since they never need to be fully removed, though, you’re not likely to lose them.

OneUp Components Switch quick change 1x mountain bike chainrings for SRAM

OneUp Components Switch quick change 1x mountain bike chainrings for SRAM

The outward facing bolt design also makes it super easy to change gears if you’re running a bash guard.

OneUp Components Switch quick change 1x mountain bike chainrings for SRAM Race Face Cinch Cannondale and e13

The full list of carriers includes:

  • SRAM GXP (Regular / Boost / Super Boost)
  • SRAM BB30 (Short/Long Spindle)
  • Race Face Cinch (Regular / Boost / Super Boost)
  • Cannondale (Regular / Ai / FATCAAD)
  • E13 (Regular, Boost)
  • Hope (Regular, Boost)

That gives you chainlines of 49mm (Regular), 52mm (
Boost), and 56.5mm (
Super Boost). As for chainrings, they’re offering round and oval chainrings in 28 / 30 / 32 / 34 / 36 tooth counts. Sold together as a system, the Switch ring and carrier will retail for the same price as their standard one-piece 1x direct mount chainrings. So, other than a few extra grams, there’s no penalty for, um, switching. Retail is $63-$67 depending on chainring size. Replacement rings will run $40-$44, and the carriers are $23 each.

OneUp says a ring can be swapped in under a minute, or “faster than it takes your friend to put on his riding shoes.” So, is it solid? Will it hold up? They’ve been testing it for a long time, so presumably yes, but we’ve got a set in for testing…stay tuned for actual weights and more details later today followed by a long term test later this spring.

Update: first look here…

OneUpComponents.com

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32 Comments
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Marin
Marin
5 years ago

So they nullified the advantage of DM systems (less weight, nicer look) in order to get faster chainring installation?

I guess it makes sense for some racers who change their rings often, but then again those people should get Shimano cranks.

davie
davie
5 years ago

I have an amazing system on my 1×10 bike which allows me to swap out front chain rings even faster than this design. Its even more amazing as the alternate chainrings go with me on the ride so, I can swap them out in the middle of nowhere. In fact, I don’t even need tools to swap out the chain ring, I simply push a lever near my left thumb and the chain ring is swapped out for a larger or smaller one. It takes less than a minute, usually about 59 1/2 seconds less than a minute. I like to think of my amazing system as a “3 by 1×10” system.

JMAN
JMAN
5 years ago
Reply to  davie

Amen

Jason
Jason
5 years ago
Reply to  davie

Love it!

Gef
Gef
5 years ago
Reply to  davie

It’ll never catch on.

the biz
the biz
5 years ago
Reply to  davie

outside of a touring bike I have no use for triples in 2017, and I would even find a way not to put one on a touring bike

Dockboy
Dockboy
5 years ago
Reply to  the biz

But a 74/110 double would be great. I want a wide/low double.

Jason
Jason
5 years ago
Reply to  Dockboy

I could get on board with that idea. A 42/26 XT setup would be nice.

2pacfan187
5 years ago
Reply to  the biz

I recently tried 46/30 up front, and the gear ratio jump is a bit disconcertingly abrupt.
I’d still consider it for touring, but I’m less excited about that as a subcompact double option.

Tomi
Tomi
5 years ago

Looks like a solution looking for a problem. Or rather more problems. Having ripped a chainring out of a (carbon) spider in a power climb last year I wouldn’t feel confident about that chainring/spider interface.

pk171
5 years ago

good that some people do not get it
it is not about changing rings faster
it is about producing 23 different cnc parts and offering with them 130 different possibilities
I think it is perfect – if I ever change my shimano xt crank I will buy this system

Luis
Luis
5 years ago

I dislike how products like this and 1x marketing in general have a blatant disregard for chain length.

Bill
Bill
5 years ago
Reply to  Luis

Well, old school short cage derailluers could handle a 14 tooth chainring jump just fine, and the newer clutch rear derailluers are even better at handling gear ranges, so…

Luis
Luis
5 years ago
Reply to  Bill

Take a sram XX1 setup sized with a 26 Chainring and install a 40 (14 tooth jump…) and let me know how well that goes for you

Doug
Doug
5 years ago
Reply to  Luis

Why would general 1x marketing cover chain length? I dislike how commenters like this have a blatant disregard for common sense.

Luis
Luis
5 years ago
Reply to  Doug

Becuase since 1x came about a big part of the marketing push was the ability to change chainrings quickly with XX1. If you’ve got your chain sized to a 30t and you go 34 let me know how well that goes for you.

Sam
Sam
5 years ago

This seems like something that would have more appeal in cyclocross or gravel

Ck
Ck
5 years ago
Reply to  Sam

I never thought about that, but I totally agree since i’m currently in the process of looking for a bigger ring to swap onto my CX bike for gravel riding.

nsp234
nsp234
5 years ago

This is super cool! I’d love to easily swap my chainrings. Also, with traditional direct mount rings, you throw away much more of your chainring than you actually need to. The arms dont wear…

The same thing should be done for brake discs. I don’t get why i always have to discard the entire thing?

This opens up options for more sophisticated arms, since you can keep them. Think carbon or whatever…

D-Con
D-Con
5 years ago

As a shop guy I think that the big driver here is SKUs. If it’s anything like Wolf Tooth’s CAMO, the weight penalty is something like 5g and the price difference $5. The big deal is that when someone comes in looking for a 34t oval for an S-Works crank we have a decent chance of helping them (S-Works spider, 34t oval ring, and bolts in whatever color they want).

But finding that unicorn crank /spacing /color/ tooth count combination in a DM ring? Good luck. And before you cry “104×4 for ever!” remember that some folks (especially in the mountains) want sub-30t rings with a decent chainline or stainless options that don’t weigh a ton.

Once in a system, replacement or condition-specific rings are cheaper, which is a bonus, and race night swaps are faster /easier.

Jason
Jason
5 years ago

“Single chainrings have made our bikes lighter and simpler, and the accompanying wide range cassettes eliminated any drawbacks.” Good grief.

IP Police
IP Police
5 years ago

Isn’t this a pretty blatant copy of Wolf Tooth’s CAMO system they launched last summer?

feldybikes
5 years ago

Oh man, Tyler. More pushback on this than an e-bike article.

Colin M
Colin M
5 years ago

That is because pixie front rings and MEGA rear cassettes are complete opposite of what we were all running not too many years ago. Then things went full enduro. Now we don’t know if we should go full enduro. It is all so confusing, and expensive, and hard to explain to your friends why you don’t just buy a e-bike if you can’t even pedal up a hill with pixie gears.

Flatbiller
Flatbiller
5 years ago

I only see serious enduro braahs being into the “pros” offered by this. And then it’ll be fund to see EWS rules amended so that a chainring swap means DQ.

DaveA
DaveA
5 years ago

This is great. I can carry one or two extra rings in my hydration pack, I mean my fanny pack.

Smokestack
Smokestack
5 years ago

I don’t see how not having to remove your crank or chainring bolts to swap out a ring a bad thing. May not be as clean looking as a DM chainring, but I will take practical function over aesthetics most any day of the week.

Coburn Brown
Coburn Brown
5 years ago

Have fun dealing with your chain line changing all the time, with most 1×11 setups the rear derailleur doesn’t have much extra room to accommodate less/more chain. I’ve also found from having snapped the chain on my 1×11 (damn skinny chains) that changing the chain length actually affects the shifting as well, meaning a quick limit screw or cable adjustment is also necessary… Good idea, I’ll just HTFU and push a bigger ring when I plan on climbing though.

hamjam
hamjam
5 years ago

3 things that will never catch on:
29ers
1x
Carbon fiber frames

joe
joe
5 years ago

This is interesting and probably should be standardized in the future. What you are replacing is the most wear prone part, and only only the actual teeth get swapped out on a chain ring. That way you could run a steel chain ring for training on an aluminum spider.

ed
ed
5 years ago

I can do ultra-fast chainring swaps on my 3×10! From climbing 20% crazy steep to flying down a road at over 30mph all in the same ride. Sram and their 1x ilk have no idea what they are talking about.

Mark Mariano
5 years ago

32T during training & 28T during race. no need to remove crank.

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