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Paul Components’ Boutique Dropper Trigger is Beauty and Function Realized

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger hero(Photos/Ron Frazelle)
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Sunny Chico, California is the home of Paul Component Engineering. Paul Components has been making high-end, USA-made bike parts in Chico since 1989. Their products are full of precision machining, being made with aerospace-like tolerances. Their parts are not only beautifully engineered to work very well, but they are beautiful to look at as well and carry a high bling factor – their Dropper Trigger is no exception.

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger semi hero
(Photos/Ron Frazelle)

The Haro Saguaro 1 I am reviewing came spec’d with a TranzX Dropper. I did not like the stock lever it came with. It felt hard to push and strained when actuating the post. So, I reached out to Paul Components to review their version of a dropper lever, the Dropper Trigger. And, yeah, I got one in gold, ’cause well, it’s gold.

Outta The Box

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger. up close jpeg

The blingy beauty of the gold anodized Dropper Trigger caught my eye instantly upon opening the box. The machining is perfect with meticulous attention to detail. This is something I’ve come to expect from Paul Components and sets the brand apart from others. The Dropper Trigger weight is feathery at 40g.

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger mounted

Build Quality

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger double cartridge sealed bearings
You can see the ergonomic curvature of the paddle here.

After putting the Dropper Trigger prototypes through rigorous testing for over a year, the final version ends up with some unique features. The first is dual-stacked sealed cartridge bearings in the pivot. This eliminates any pivot slop, boasts super light trigger action, and provides a long serviceable life.

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger exploded

I can’t touch on the precision of bike parts that come from Paul Components enough. I mentioned earlier the aerospace-like tolerances that their components have. For example, the Dropper Trigger is machined in Chico, California from 6061 American aluminum to 0.0005″ tolerance.

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger flip flop mounting option
The cable can be installed in either direction…

There is also a pinch bolt and a cable head recess which allows you to run your dropper cable in either direction. The paddle is curved for ergonomics. The Dropper Trigger has a hinged clamp for easy installation on or removal from the handlebars. Finally, there is a nice barrel adjuster for a quick way to remove slack from the system or fine-tune the cable tension.

Operating the Lever and Final Thoughts

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger paddle P

The installation went flawlessly, and the Paul Dropper Trigger operates the TranzX dropper smoothly with a very light actuation, thanks to the stacked sealed cartridge bearings.

I don’t think this needs to be a long-term review, as I feel that you either like a dropper lever or you don’t.

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger Easy installation

The Paul Dropper Trigger has been great on the Haro so far, and the ergonomic paddle shape feels flat and positive when engaging it with your thumb.

Paul Component Engineering Dropper Trigger USA paddle

The build quality, attention to detail, and unique features ensure that this component will be as long-lived and serviceable as everything that comes from Paul Components.

The Paul Dropper Trigger comes in two clamp sizes, 22.2 (MTB) and 31.8 (drop bars). It comes in ten different anodized colors and retails for $97 ($137 for polished).

PaulComp.com

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8 Comments
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Tim
Tim
19 days ago

I find that my thumb bumps uncomfortably against most dropper remotes as I ride, so the shorter lever is welcome.
However I find the Wolftooth Pro remote with eccentric pivot and cartridge bearing is a better value than the Paul remote as the former is around 25 bucks cheaper.

Greg
Greg
19 days ago
Reply to  Tim

What was keeping you from mounting one of the uncomfortable levers inboard, making room for your fingers?

Chunk
Chunk
19 days ago
Reply to  Greg

He’s got really weird thumbs, man,

Tim
Tim
18 days ago
Reply to  Greg

Jones bars with 200mm grips. There just isn’t much space left.

WhateverBikes
18 days ago

It looks nice, kinda – for a dropper post trigger that is, because man those things are an eyesore – but it is a mystery to me why they didn’t go for the iconic polished barrel adjuster they use on their brake levers.
Way nicer to look at than these bland, run of the mill barrel adjusters, and instantly recognizable.

Tom
Tom
18 days ago
Reply to  WhateverBikes

Agree with this. They use the same plastic barrel adjusters on their Thumbies too, would love it if they made a smaller barrel adjuster out of aluminum for shifter housing. I replaced the ones on my thumbies with brass ones from and they look much nicer.

Scott
Scott
10 days ago

My purple Paul lever has faded pretty badly almost back to silver. Actuation is perfect though.

Andre
Andre
7 days ago

I use WolfTooth remotes on all of my bikes. I had a crash the other day and slammed my knee into the lever hard enough to break it off. When I got home and figured out what broke I found that it was a $5 plastic “ReMote Axle”. Received it in a couple of days and I was back up and running. I love components with intelligent sacrificial parts that make service and survival easy and cheap.

I don’t see anything like this for the Paul. Sure it’s very pretty but I would have had to buy a new one.

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