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Pinarello Dogma X Gets Wild X-Stays and Huge Tire Clearance for Fast Comfort

New X-Series additions also gain new Flexi-Stay design with room for bigger tires.

Pinarello Dogma X with x-series in background
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Cycling comfort can mean different things to different riders. While some cyclists simply want a smoother riding bike that still features aggressive geometry, others want even more comfort with a geometry that is far more forgiving.

Regardless of what side of the spectrum you find yourself on, Pinarello now has an option for both with the introduction of two new platforms.

On one side, you have the new Pinarello Dogma X. Pinarello specifically states that they didn’t start with a template designed for WorldTour racers. Instead, they focused on what most riders actually need – speed, comfort, and a geometry in between the Dogma F and the current X1/3. On the other side, there are new additions to the X-Series with all-new Flexi-Stays 2 for even more compliance. Both of these bikes offer massive tire clearance with the ability to run up to 700c x 35mm tires.

Dogma X

The new Dogma X is an interesting bike as it wasn’t designed to be used by Team Ineos, but it’s not your typical comfort road bike either. Technically, Dogma X would be considered an All-Road bike – just one that is designed to be very fast.

X-Stays

Rather than adding a suspension system that could increase the weight, Pinarello focused on the compliance of the seat stays. This is not a new concept in the bike industry, but their X-Stay design is a functional design with a novel approach to blending comfort and performance. The slender seat stays are curved to increase vertical compliance, while the four attachment points to the seat tube and the X cross bracing prevent efficiency loss. Pinarello also claims that by doubling the attachment points to the seat tube over a greater area further reduces the amount of vibration noticeable to the rider.

Pinarello Dogma X rear shot

The design has a bit of dropped-stay look to it, but it’s wildly different than the current Pinarello X endurance bike.

Massive Tire Clearance

How big do you want to go when it comes to tires? 30mm? 32mm? How about 35mm? That’s actually not that extreme when you consider that our 700c x 32mm Specialized S-Works Mondo tires stretched out to 34+mm on modern wide rims. It’s not quite gravel bike territory, but it certainly blurs into the all-road category with the ability to run some tires with a bit of tread for hard-packed gravel & dirt adventures.

Tire clearance was one of the core features built around. Pinarello’s initial testing found that elastomers and other devices weren’t needed for comfort if wider tires were used. Noting that Paris Roubaix has been won on 32mm tubeless tires the last two times, Pinarello started at 32mm and went up to 35mm tire clearance as they found that the tubeless tires in larger sizes showed real improvements in comfort without adding weight to the frame. 

Frame Construction

To make the frame as light as possible, Pinarello continues their collaboration with Toray Industries. The Dogma X frame features T1100 1K carbon fiber with a specific layup on the rear triangle for absorbing vibration.

Asymmetry

Pinarello loves their asymmetry, and the Dogma X is no different. They point out that while the rider inputs force on both sides of the crank equally, only the driveside of the frame has to deal with the forces exerted from the chain on the gears. As such, the two halves of the bike are different with a dropped chainstay near the rear brake, and a downtube that’s shifted towards the drive-side near the bottom bracket.

Still Aerodynamic

The Dogma X might be built with an eye toward comfort, but as Pinarello puts it, “aerodynamics always count.” As a result, you’ll find many of the aerodynamic touches found on the Dogma F including the Onda fork with Fork Flaps, their Flatback truncated aerofoil tube profiles, and the TiCR headset system. Pinarello claims the TiCR system alone is worth 5 watts compared to a standard stem & steerer tube setup.

Dogma X Weight

In spite of the bigger tire clearance, the Dogma X is still pretty light. The claimed weight for a 53cm frame is 950g, while the fork is 400g. Perhaps more impressive is the weight of the X-Series. Even with a slightly lower grade carbon, the X9 & X7 frames weigh 960g each, just 10g more. The X5 is also impressive at 990g for the frame. All of the X-Series use a fork that weighs the same 400g as the Dogma X.

Dogma X Geometry

Geometry-wise, the Dogma X maintains an aggressive fit without being quite as aggressive as the Dogma F. With the Dogma F, X, and X-Series geometries side by side, the Dogma X is nearly right in the middle of the two in terms of stack and reach. Officially, the Dogma X has a 3.9mm shorter reach compared to Dogma F and 15.4mm increase in stack height. There a few other changes including a greater BB drop and slightly longer chainstay to fit the bigger tires. There are also 11 different sizes giving riders a lot to choose from.

Pricing, Colors, & Builds

The Dogma X will be offered with Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 with/without power, SRAM RED AXS, and Campagnolo Super Record Wireless. Depending on the build, the wheels included will be the DT Swiss ERC 1400, Princeton Grit 4540, or Campagnolo Bora WTO 33. 

Four different stock colors will be offered including Xolar Black, Xolar Sun, Xolar Green, and Xolar Blue, and you’ll have the ability to customize your finish through the Pinarello MyWay program.

Anything with the word ‘Dogma’ in the title likely won’t come cheap, and the Dogma X is no exception. With pricing starting at $15,500, the $6,950 frameset price almost seems like a bargain.

X-Series

Fortunately for those who can’t stomach a $16k road bike, the new X-Series comes in quite a bit less expensive and still offers a lot of comfort for your money. Using the same tall & short geometry as the existing X 1/3, the new X-Series additions include a new seatstay design for an even higher level of comfort and increased tire clearance as well. Pinarello calls the new X-Series models, “the best bike for the longest rides.”

Flexi Stays 2

At first glance, the Flexi Stays 2 look similar to the X-Stays found on the Dogma X, but they lack the namesake ‘X’ bracing. That should make the rear end of the X-Series even more compliant than the Dogma X, and also more compliant than the existing X 1/3. The design benefits from the same slender stay profile and four attachment points to the seat tube to disperse vibrations.

Tire Clearance

Just like the Dogma X, the X-Series gets a massive boost in tire clearance with room for 35mm rubber – though complete bikes will ship with 32mm tires.

Frame Construction

Another difference for the X-Series is a change in the carbon fiber. Unlike the Dogma X which uses the top-end T1100 1k fiber from Toray, the X7 & X9 will use Toray T900, while the X5 limits use to T700. The higher the number, the higher the modulus and tensile strength, meaning you can achieve greater stiffness with fewer carbon plies, and therefore less weight.

You’ll also find a lot of the same design features on the X-Series as other Pinarellos including their asymmetric design, Onda fork with Fork Flaps, their Flatback profile for aerodynamics, and the TiCR headset system.

Geometry

Essentially, the X-Series uses the same geometry found on the X 1/3 and previously on the Pinarello Paris. There are slight differences to accommodate the bigger tire clearance, but the reach and stack remain the same. Unlike the Dogma X which gets 11 sizes, the X-Series keeps to nine.

Pricing & Builds

If you’re looking at the top X9 build, the pricing is still steep at $11,800, but the X5 gets much more approachable at $6,000. The new X5 through X9 are also in addition to the existing X1/3 which have even lower price points. All of the builds will include Shimano Di2 drivetrains, and either Fulcrum, Most, or Shimano wheels.

pinarello.com

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24 Comments
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Bewer
Bewer
8 months ago

Maybe that the x-construction makes technically sense, but it looks ugly for me.

Mark
Mark
8 months ago
Reply to  Bewer

I doubt it actually provides any benefit, especially with larger volume tires. Their marketing dept probably said “Hey, we’re going to name it ‘X’, so put an x in the frame.”

will
will
8 months ago
Reply to  Mark

and add a few thousands to the price – honestly its exactly what it looks like

Shaze
Shaze
8 months ago

from a designer perspective, structural X-stay to smooth S fork doesn’t fit well. Not a fan of angled Top tube (remind me of canyon grail even if its smoother)

jonathan
jonathan
8 months ago

Massive? Huge tire clearance? The Tarmac fits 35, the SuperSix fits 34 (probably 35), the Synapse fits 35, the new Roubaix fits *40*. Seems like 35 is the new standard for modern carbon disc road bikes.

Oliver
Oliver
8 months ago

There are loads of seatstay failures on the Dogma F disc brake. Quite a lot of them happening within the first 500-1000km. I can’t imagine this unconventional, angular and very thin & vulnerable design doing better …

Oliver
Oliver
8 months ago
Reply to  Oliver

Also $7k (probably €8k in EU) mass produced Chinese endurance frameset?? What are they smoking?

SteveT
SteveT
8 months ago
Reply to  Oliver

Crack cocaine for sure. To think I can get a full custom CF frameset with exponentially more attention to detail for under $5,000 from someone like Pursuit Cycles and these clown want almost $7K for a mainland China sweatshop fabbed stock cookie cutter frameset is beyond laughable. 🙂

Andreas
Andreas
8 months ago
Reply to  Oliver

Interesting with the claimed seatstay failures. Got a link for that? Thanks!

mud
mud
8 months ago

Probably they would get the same benefits (vertical compliance, horizontal stiffness) with dropped stays and no X, but then they wouldn’t be different.

SteveT
SteveT
8 months ago
Reply to  mud

Or you could just properly fab conventional seatstays with correct diameters and avoid all the marketing gimmick nonsense like quality frame builders used to do for decades and decades and some still do. 🙂

Roger Pedacter
Roger Pedacter
8 months ago

Pinarello used to make such nice bikes. Now it’s just flashy marketing garbage.

SteveT
SteveT
8 months ago
Reply to  Roger Pedacter

They stopped making serious bikes in the late 90’s when they started moving all the production to mainland China with “finishing” in Taiwan. Brand has gone completely downhill since then. $6,950 for a stock cookie cutter frameset fabbed in a sweatshop in Mainland China? LOL, what a complete joke, but gullible easily marketed to fools abound. 🙂

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
8 months ago
Reply to  SteveT

Their carbon QC actually improved when the started making carbon in China. It’s still not good though

rxpt
rxpt
8 months ago

Why do these bicycles cost more that a more complexly engineered sportsbike that has more material on it? It continues to be delusional.

SteveT
SteveT
8 months ago

$6,950 for a frameset might be a bargain? For a cheap Chinese mass produced cookie cutter stock frameset? ROTFLMFAO 🙂

bigben
bigben
8 months ago
Reply to  SteveT

SteveT seems triggered in every bikerumor post these days

Andrew
Andrew
8 months ago

In central London there’s a street with two swanky stores sitting along with each other. One it’s the Assos Boutique and the one is the Pinarello Boutique. This says a lot about who may be the potential buyer of these pointlessly expensive bikes. I wonder if LVMH is still trying to shake this brand from their portfolio….

SomeGuy
SomeGuy
8 months ago

Pinarello was making some pretty impressive bikes not that long ago, but they’ve succumbed to gimmick marketing. All those years under Louis Vitton are gonna take time to heal from.

Dave
Dave
8 months ago

Nothing against Pinarello but if I am going to ride an Italian company I want the frame made in Italy. So did just that. 3T Racemax Italia from my local shop. And under $10K for a complete bike.

https://us.3t.bike/en/241-racemax-italia?highlight=racemax-italia-force-d2-axs-2×12-700c-carbon

Brian
Brian
8 months ago

What unadulterated, desperate nonsense. This bike is BY marketing people FOR marketing people.

FritzP
FritzP
7 months ago

Pinarello needs to learn that less is more as far as bike design goes. All this Italian design flair does is add weight.

Are the claimed weights with paint and hardware or without?

Sloppy
Sloppy
2 months ago

Weight of total bike ?

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