As disc brakes come back around for pro peloton use, Pinarello is joining the party. Already approved for UCI competition use, the F10 now has a disc brake equipped sibling in the ‘F10 Disk.’ Very similar to the current Dogma F10, the bike does have a few unique features that are specific to the disc brake version…

Even though Pinarello has openly voiced their opinion that disc brakes aren’t needed for high end road bikes, that hasn’t stopped them from updating their highest performance bike with the new stoppers. Naturally, the brake area sees the biggest changes for the F10 Disk moving to 12mm thru axles (100 x 12 front and 142 x 12 rear), and modifying the fork and stays to handle the stresses of increased stopping power. Other details include an Italian threaded BB, 160mm flat mount disc tabs, ICR internal cable routing, and a max tire clearance of 25mm.

photos c. Pinarello

Pinarello says otherwise the frame includes “all the qualities and characteristics of a Dogma F10” including flatback stays, concave down tube, Twinforce saddle clamping system, and dual bottle positions on the seat tube.

Available in a full 11 sizes (44, 46.5, 50, 51.5, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57.5, 59.5, and 62), the Dogma F10 Disk comes in Mars Orange, Black Lava, Black on Black, Red Magma, and Team Sky. Pricing is TBA.

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Technician
Technician
4 years ago

comment image

blah blah blah
blah blah blah
4 years ago
Reply to  Technician

lol made my day thanks!

O Hare
O Hare
4 years ago
Reply to  Technician

That was my first reaction! Who in their right marketing mind would release the orange background pic? Made me laugh!

jasonmiles31
4 years ago

Is there a reason Pinarello misspells disc?

fred
fred
4 years ago
Reply to  jasonmiles31

tomato or tomatoes? i’m pretty sure disk is the proper spelling for ‘a flat, thin, round object.’ for some reason bike industry goes with disc. does it really matte 😕

jasonmiles31
4 years ago
Reply to  fred

I assume that disc brakes are spelled that way because they were first invented in England, just as hard disk drives were invented in the US. In this case I consider it a misspelling which is especially confusing as I think the Italian word for “disk” or “disc” is “disco”.

fred
fred
4 years ago
Reply to  jasonmiles31

dogma disco, has a great ring to it.

tyler
4 years ago

max tire = 25mm?! why would they do that?

Seraph
Seraph
4 years ago
Reply to  tyler

Because it’s a race bike, not an endurance or gravel bike.

Jeb
Jeb
4 years ago
Reply to  Seraph

That’s bollocks. Quite a few teams run 28’s and a few 30’s in the cobbled races this year, races you’d think that bike would be made for. Specialized sponsored teams are also using their 26mm tubular for all around racing, a tire i’ve heard measure out closer to 27mm.

Eugene Chan
4 years ago
Reply to  Jeb

I expect 25mm tires on modern, wide clincher rims (19mm inner, >27mm outer) to balloon to 28-29mm anyway. My Schwalbe Pro Ones do. It’s very likely that 28mm measured tires will fit and be more aero than 25s since gaps between tires and seattube or downtube will be smaller.

Anonymous
Anonymous
4 years ago
Reply to  Jeb

Pinarello makes the K8 for that.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
4 years ago
Reply to  Seraph

Since when does a 25 max tire size delineate “race bike”? Then what do all those pros racing the Spring Classics have any business running 28’s? They must be doing it all wrong, right?.There are a multitude of disc road “race” bikes that will except a 28 tire, some even a 30. One of the biggest benefits of disc is to be able to run bigger tires, but when you’re bandwagon like Pinarello you only figure that out well after everybody else does.

mario veldboer
mario veldboer
4 years ago
Reply to  tyler

Wide rim plus 25mm tyre = 28mm width

Ettore
Ettore
4 years ago
Reply to  mario veldboer

You can’t be certain about that. Depends on the rim and the tire.

Cherk Chup
4 years ago
Reply to  Ettore

yes, ettore is correct.

My Roval CLX32/50 has 21.77mm int width and the 25.032mm Pro One is measured at 28.75mm wide when it’s inflated to 70.123 psi. I’m more than 80% certain that my measurement are 100% correct.

Ettore
Ettore
4 years ago
Reply to  Cherk Chup

What is your certainty number of >80% based on? 😉

Ettore
Ettore
4 years ago
Reply to  tyler

This whole measurement makes no sense anyway. They should just stick to maximum diameter of wheel + tire. Which will be close to 684mm on a bike that is designed to “fit 28mm tires”. Given all the different combinations of wheels, tires and their actual resulting sizes, this is the only foolproof way to go about.

Seraph
Seraph
4 years ago

Centerline rotors with Shimano calipers…huh…someone dun’ goofed.

MB
MB
4 years ago
Reply to  Seraph

Wheels will be 6 bolt, Shimano new ones are centrelock only sadly.

comrad
comrad
4 years ago
Reply to  Seraph

Centerlines are some of the best in the biz. I run them on all my disc setups which include spyres, xts, and r785

Seraph
Seraph
4 years ago
Reply to  comrad

I don’t mix and match. Never do. Always run the recommended rotors for the caliper. Release of liability for us career mechanics.

night
night
4 years ago
Reply to  Seraph

lol you miss spelled pretentious mechanics. as long as the rotor is designed to use the material the pad is made of it will be fine.

Mark
4 years ago

I can’t understand why anyone is still offering Italian BB threading. It’s only a matter of time before the drive side cups loosen.

Craig
Craig
4 years ago
Reply to  Mark

My thoughts also re the BB thread type.

Jonathon
Jonathon
4 years ago
Reply to  Mark

10 years on my carbon Pinarello with the same Campy Record BB cups, so any day now right? Armchair cyclists..

Max Imum
Max Imum
4 years ago
Reply to  Jonathon

No offense but all you’re really saying is that bike doesn’t have very many miles. The same BB for ten years?!?! More riding time equals increased chance of cups unthreading.

Jonathon
Jonathon
4 years ago
Reply to  Max Imum

With Campy, the empty cups are on the frame and the bearing are attached to the cranks, so replacing bearing doesn’t require fiddling with the cups. 10k+ miles a year without issue. Any day now.. right?

Mark
4 years ago
Reply to  Jonathon

You’ve averaged 200 miles a week for 10 years? That’s really hard to believe.

Robin
Robin
4 years ago
Reply to  Mark

You should look around more. There are more than a few people putting that many miles on bikes each year.

Some dude
Some dude
4 years ago
Reply to  Mark

I don’t know him, but that really isn’t hard to believe.

Mark
4 years ago
Reply to  Mark

I live in Scottsdale, Arizona, work full time and am happy to get 1/2 that in. Anyone care to share their
Strava data?

Jonathon
Jonathon
4 years ago
Reply to  Mark

Yes, a typical on week is 200-400 miles. 10-20 hours a week on the bike.

fred
fred
4 years ago
Reply to  Mark

yea they come unthreaded when pulled out by a mechanic..

Mark
4 years ago
Reply to  Mark

Simply because you haven’t had issues doesn’t mean it’s not less than good design. Italian threading is prone to the effects of precession, something that I and countless others have experienced, and the reason why virtually all non-Italian frames with threaded BB’s use left hand (English) threading on the drive side.

yard dog
yard dog
4 years ago

glad to see the BB threading is Italian

Michael Myers
Michael Myers
4 years ago
Reply to  yard dog

Is that sarcasm?

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
4 years ago

“Even though Pinarello has openly voiced their opinion that disc brakes aren’t needed for high end road bikes, that hasn’t stopped them from updating their highest performance bike with the new stoppers.”

Because the general consumer figured out years ago that disc brakes perform better, and the pros just figured this out basically in a ‘born yesterday’ sort of way.. So Pinarello makes stupid comments like….

Fausto Pinarello: “We don’t think a high-performance bike needs disc brakes” (1/25/2017 cyclingnews.com)

Gee, well… apparently that’s not very truthful. My money goes elsewhere. Not a hard decision to make in this case.

Jonathon
Jonathon
4 years ago

The 2016 Dogma F8 was available with disc brakes…

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
4 years ago
Reply to  Jonathon

You totally missed the point, which was entirely clear. I won’t support a company who’s CEO who says dishonest things about the vision of his company then turns around and does the exact opposite simply in the name of profit.

I’d rather give my money to someone like Focus or BMC who are straightforward in their approach and are at the tip of the spear when it comes to advancing road disc technology. (deleted)

Jeb
Jeb
4 years ago

BMC maybe but Focus just got a huge FU from me for developing E-road bikes that are styled as road race bikes and designed to hide the fact they are e-bikes.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
4 years ago
Reply to  Jeb

Don’t care about the Ebike drama. Izalco Max disc has been one of the very best road disc bikes on the market for the last 2-3 years.

dustytires
4 years ago

I know that beauty is in the eyes of the beer holder, so just clicking on this thread I was put off by the heinous heat tube and seat tube, but hey, its a pro bike and they need aero assist, but EAR LOBES on the freakin fork tips, over the top Fausto…

blah blah blah
blah blah blah
4 years ago

as long time disliker of the pinarello way, gee that sky version looks awesome and i hate team bikes. and those Campagnolo levers, cant eat my dinner now! thanks