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Pivot Cycles extends warranty to 10 years on all new bikes

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pivot cycles 10 year warranty

Launched at Interbike 2007, Pivot Cycles is just about to celebrate their 10th birthday. To celebrate, they’ve upped the warranty on all new bikes to a full decade. Any new Pivot bike or frame purchased from an authorized dealer after June 1, 2017, comes with the new warranty. They guarantee the frame to be free of defects in materials or workmanship for a full 10 years.

“From the very start, our mission has been to produce the absolute best bikes, period. Our designs test to the highest levels of strength and durability, and are proven in the toughest events, ridden by the most demanding athletes. We stand proudly behind every product.” said Chris Cocalis, President and CEO of Pivot Cycles, adding, “This new warranty program is the best way to share this confidence with Pivot riders. It reflects our first-class customer service, remarkable product dependability, and the rider-satisfaction that comes standard with every Pivot.”

We don’t suspect they’ll get many claims, check out our Pivot HQ tour to see how they manage quality control. Get full program details on their website here.

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26 Comments
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mnorris122
6 years ago

I automatically don’t trust any manufacturer that offers less than a 10 year warranty on their frames. Lifetime is better, obviously. Some manufacturers need to get outta here with their 3 and 5 year warranties

Matthew
Matthew
6 years ago
Reply to  mnorris122

Its foolish to think that bikes should last forever. Especially todays bike travel full suspension bikes with the big hits some of them take. Any manufacturer defect is going to show up in the first 2 years

Sevo
Sevo
6 years ago
Reply to  Matthew

Agreed. Maybe a hard tail steel or titanium bike. But if you want light weight you have to set your expectations realistically.

mnorris122
6 years ago
Reply to  Matthew

So why can Specialized, Giant, Litespeed, Pivot and many others back up their bikes so well? No one likes giving away free products, and a company’s warranty policy is a direct reflection of how long that company thinks their product will last.

Maciej Pike-Biegunski
Maciej Pike-Biegunski
6 years ago
Reply to  mnorris122

I applaud Pivot for this move-it shows confidence in their product. However, bikes (even from the big 3) are only designed to be ridden hard (intended purpose, high mileage) for about 3 years.

Riders who crack frames that often (I’m one) are considered a cost of doing business and ambassadors for a brand; you see a fast local rider tearing it up on a Giant you’re more likely to get one yourself.

skip
skip
6 years ago
Reply to  mnorris122

Because cost of production goes down with scale. No one likes giving away free product, but some companies can afford to more readily than others.

fred
fred
6 years ago
Reply to  mnorris122

what a troll. for one reason, the vast majority of bikes sold by companies like specialized will never be ridden enough to fail from fatigue or ‘manufacturing defects.’ i mean really, it requires WAY more riding than an average consumer can even think about to fatigue/break these frames. companies like pivot sell to a small and niche market justifying the difference in their already very respectable warranty. if you ride a bike 100,000 miles and it eventually stress fractures, you think the company should warranty the bike?? give me a break. every product has a lifecycle, you should be so lucky that major bike companies offer such long warranties. how is that lifetime warranty going on your ford, honda, chevy, or whatever?

jburton
jburton
6 years ago
Reply to  mnorris122

I work in a Giant shop and it’s lifetime warranty for the original owner. We dealt with a few warranty bikes and they are probably the best in the industry and it comes to get you an a replacement frame quick.
In terms of failure there are also less then other brand out there, not to name any brands that have more then average return.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/_upload_au/Giant-global-Warranty-Policy.pdf

send it Jerry
send it Jerry
6 years ago

It’s great that Pivot is offering a 10 year warranty. However if you expect any full suspension mountain bike to last after 10 years of riding you’re sadly out of touch with reality. No doubt Pivots frame will last that long but the life cycle of the suspension, drivetrain and brakes is less than five years. Not to mention the frequency of the bike industry to change “standards” on wheels, hubs, BBs, brake mounts etc will render any bike over 5 years nearly obsolete in terms of finding replacement parts.

Esteban LV (@es7ebanlv)
Reply to  send it Jerry

Why? Seriously, why?

That may be true in USA, Canada, Europe… But in the third world people can’t change bikes that often (shocking, I know), so why shouldn’t we expect a frame to last longer than 10 years?

It’s obvious all components will eventually need to be upgraded, that’s a non issue.

I had a Trek hardtail from 2006, the frame broke about three years ago (descending a volcano at 50km/h) and they gave me a new one. I expect this one to last as much, and if don’t, well, I’ll get a free replacement again.

It seems to me you’re only saying “people that don’t live in *my* reality are out of touch with reality”

One shouldn’t expect carbon, maybe, to last 10 years, but alloy? Come on, 10 years is very doable.

send it Jerry
send it Jerry
6 years ago

Esteban -Why? Seriously. Why? — My reality may be different than yours but we are both playing within the boundaries the bike industry has created.

I was primarily speaking of most carbon full suspension bikes not lasting ten years. However you brought aluminum Hardtails into this and actually proved my point further. Your 2006 hardtail frame did not last ten years, so even for alloy it’s not very realistic. It sucks that your frame broke, hopefully you didn’t get hurt. Yes, you can “expect” a frame to last but that doesn’t mean it will.

I’m surprised Trek had a direct replacement frame available to you. In my experience most brands only have the current model year available to offer as warranty replacements. Which often means that if the broken frame is several years old, your existing parts are probably not compatible with new “standards” on the replacement frame.

I think the 10 year or even lifetime warranty some brands offer is simply another advertising tool and less about how they perceive their products. It’s a roll of the dice for them. How many frames will actually get warrantied in that time verses how many additional models will be sold because they offered a longer warranty. Additionally, many people do not keep their bikes for ten years before selling them and the warranty only applies to the original owner.

In my opinion Pivot makes the highest quality frames in the industry. I would purchase one without any warranty but most consumers need the reassurance that a longer warranty provides. Which means Pivot, who arguably has the best frames available will now sell more products without really changing anything except offering a longer warranty. Good for them! Hopefully they continue chiseling away market share from the disposable bikes of the big 3.

Dylan
Dylan
6 years ago
Reply to  send it Jerry

Wow, you would buy one without a warranty, when there are is at least one and up to three posts on this very thread (with less than 25 posts, and on a site as small as Bikerumor) about how Pivot were good about warrantying their broken frame.

Keith
Keith
6 years ago

Good luck if you actually have a problem with a frame. It’s automatically “crash damage” to them.

Wiscomark
Wiscomark
6 years ago
Reply to  Keith

That’s definitely not been my experience.

fatcamper
6 years ago
Reply to  Wiscomark

Mine either. Cracked rear triangle was replaced in under a week for me.

Esteban LV (@es7ebanlv)
Reply to  Keith

I can vouch for the contrary with Trek.

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
6 years ago

Pivot took great care of me when I had a small issue with my 429 Trail.

gbcoke
gbcoke
6 years ago

If brands were that confident in their frames lasting so many years (really not realistic) than the warranty was not to the original owner only,but transferable. All those lifetime multi year warranties are here because brands know that the average time a customer keeps a bike these days is about 3 years (max). Any more than that is a just a marketing gimick that people apriciate too much.

Wiscomark
Wiscomark
6 years ago
Reply to  gbcoke

The “average” customer is not getting a new bike every three years.

ginsu
ginsu
6 years ago
Reply to  gbcoke

(deleted)

Esteban LV (@es7ebanlv)
Reply to  gbcoke

No. You’re falling for the “people change bikes often” fallacy. That may be true in your zone, but not all the world is your zone. We in the third world mostly don’t change bikes, until broken or stolen, so a lifetime warranty is quite important.

I’ve had a Trek replaced for free.

Josh
Josh
6 years ago

Most genuine warranty issue occur in the first two years. Past that mark it is generally lack of maintenance or a crash. I have had full suspension bikes come in with broken swingarms from seized bearing. If a pivot doesnt move then don’t expect your suspension to work without your frame being damaged.

Matt
Matt
6 years ago

This is such a weird comment section. I can’t tell if people are upset that they are getting a great warranty or happy about it. Everyone should be grateful that some leaders in the industry did the analysis and realized they could offer a 10 year warranty which also lead to others following suit.

Feminals
Feminals
6 years ago

Guys, I am not 100% sure if Trek replaced Esteban’s frame for free?

Cristian
Cristian
4 years ago

Quality control… I don’t think pivot knows what quality control is. I bought a +6000 USD 2017 bike and two years later the paint started turning yellowish, this is known as “Paint bleed”. When I spoke to pivot about the warranty guess what?? It’s not covered!!!! Because low quality and poor workmanship in paint its not covered.

” Buying a pivot it’s like going back with you ex… Feels good, looks good but at the end you will regret it”

Alex Lieber
Alex Lieber
3 years ago

Ten years is just marketing. I needed new bolts for the suspension on my 2014 Mach 429 SL …. Pivotcan’t supply the same type … not impossible but a pain. And a year ago my frame had a hairline crack, which I was able to weld. As these things pile up, you get to the point where you just want a new bike.

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