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Pro Bike Check: Raleigh-Clement Jamey Driscoll’s Raleigh RXC

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Raleigh-Clement’s Jamey Driscoll finished second in the Men’s Elite field, just a couple seconds behind winner Stephen Hyde…and likely would have taken the win had Hyde’s broken derailleur happened even just a hundred feet sooner. Driscoll’s Raleigh RXC was a stock frame, but the parts mix was full of sponsored goods from FSA, Clement, Lizard Skins, K-Edge and TRP.

Each of his bikes is numbered (his bib number was #5) and tagged with his name.

Wheels were Vision Metron 40 Disc carbon tubulars. The ~40mm deep wheel was a common sight on pro bikes.

Different bikes had different tires (PDX, BOS, etc.) already mounted and ready to make for quicker pit prep between laps.

The bike was equipped with Shimano Ultegra Di2 save for the monstrous FSA SL-K carbon cranks with their 42t MegaTooth 1x chainring.

An 11-32 cassette provided the range to tackle the climbs (those that were rideable, anyway).

Jamey opted for the mechanical TRP Spyre over the hybrid mech-to-hydraulic HyRD calipers because they’re lighter and simpler to set up. He also opted for a 160mm rear rotor over the stock 140mm size that comes on the RXC.

An alloy FSA Gossamer handlebar is paired with the SL-K stem. The stem is a 3D forged and machined stem that usually comes with a carbon fiber faceplate, but this one looks like they switched to an alloy faceplate. K-Edge computer mount is joined by their CX Chain Guide. Lizard Skins’ grippy DSP bar tape finishes things off.

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TheKaiser
6 years ago

I wonder how he has been doing with the pad wear on those mechanical discs, although I guess pros can get a fresh bike at the pits and let their wrench deal with it.

mudrock
mudrock
6 years ago
Reply to  TheKaiser

I wasn’t aware pads wear faster on mechanical discs. Why would they?

onrhodes
6 years ago
Reply to  mudrock

I’m pretty sure he is referring to the fact that hydraulic systems will keep “advancing” the pads while mechanical systems you need to do it via the cable adjuster. Just sayin’……

RAB Share
RAB Share
6 years ago
Reply to  TheKaiser

Looks like there are inline barrel adjusters on the brake cables near the handlebar. I’d guess that takes care of it in between bike swaps.

chadquest
6 years ago
Reply to  TheKaiser

I wrenched for Raleigh-Clement the 2015 season.
For muddy races we had three bikes setup for Jamey. Pad wear was only a significant issue at the super wet and sandy race in Seattle, where pads were going out in a single lap. I think we swapped pads in two bikes that race.
At least last year Jamey was using HY/RDs for the dry races and Spyres for the wet races. The pistons on the HY/RDs only advance through about 65% of the pad before they run out of fluid in the MC to push farther, so the Spyres get more total pad usage in the mud.

Greg
Greg
6 years ago

FSA face plates are carbon over aluminum, the carbon being essentially non structural.

Chewie
Chewie
6 years ago

Anybody know which tread choice he actually raced on?

Rosey
Rosey
6 years ago

Would love to see Jamey rock the hyrd with di2 climbing switch integration

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