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Pyga Industries Marathon XC bikes Feature Slack Steering and Unique Chainline Spacing

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Pyga Stage marathon XC bike- title shot

In South Africa, marathon XC racing is a very popular sport. Founded by bike industry veterans Patrick Morewood of Morewood Bikes and Leatt/cSixx products’ Mark Hopkins, Pyga Industries is a small MTB brand who set out to make bikes that feel equally at home in competitive races or on weekend trail rides. To accomplish this, they utilize slacker geometry than many full-bred race machines would offer in an attempt to keep things more versatile.

Recently Pyga launched two 29” XC models intended for regular and occasional racers, called the Stage and the Stage MAX. As their first carbon framed full-suspension bikes, these two will also debut Pyga’s new variation on rear spacing called +Five that provides a straighter chainline for their 11speed drivetrains. Check out more on Pyga’s rear spacing and geometry concepts below the break…

Pyga +Five chainline view

The brand’s +Five chainline concept is what they call a correction to driveline issue that has been a problem since the advent of 10 and 11 speed drivetrains. By dishing the rear wheel to a unique specification, the rear cassette is shifted towards to the drive side by 5mm. This system changes the effective chain line from 49 to 44mm without requiring any proprietary parts, and maintains the same front ring position in relation to the centerline of the frame.

Pyga claims this arrangement will result in better shifting performance and reduced wear and tear on drivetrain components. They say the chainline on their bikes running in the 11th (largest) cog is roughly equal to a typical bike in its 9th cog. The dishing also results in more balanced tension and spoke angles on both sides, producing a stiffer rear wheel.

Pyga Stage geometry

Pyga Stage Max geometry

Pyga frame geometry graphic

Pyga’s frame geometry follows the direction many enduro and downhill manufacturers have been moving towards. They feature slackened head tube angles and a longer front triangle which aims to provide more stability at high speeds or while cornering and better control through technical sections.

Pyga Stage marathon XC bike, side

The Stage is a race oriented machine that features the brand’s signature slackened geometry. The stage comes in two build specs with either a 120mm Rock Shox RS1 or SID fork, and it’s rear travel is 95mm. Color choices are matte blue with orange decals or gloss white with charcoal decals.

Pyga Stage Max marathon XC bike, side

The Stage MAX is the longer travel version for recreational trail riders who still want to be competitive in a race here and there. The MAX also comes in two builds with a 140mm Pike RCT3 or Pike RC, and it’s rear travel is increased to 126mm. The Stage MAX comes in either matte orange with blue decals or matte charcoal with white decals.

Both models feature carbon frames with dual water bottle mounts, a removable High-Direct front derailleur mount, clevis-style linkage pivot points, internal cable routing, tapered head tubes and a migrating active brake system. Both also come with 70mm stems, which I suppose is considered short for marathon XC racers, but would be considered long in areas with steeper, rougher ‘enduro-style’ terrain.

Pyga Industries has distributors in 12 countries, but none yet in North America, so US prices are not available at this time. However, international availability is expected for January of 2016. Check out Pyga’s website for more info and full build specs.

pygaindustries.com

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18 Comments
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Paniagua
Paniagua
7 years ago

Dishing the rear wheel won’t change the position of the cassette, I think the author meant to say the wheels position is changed 5mm thus requiring the assymetric dish.

greg
greg
7 years ago

Cannondale is doing this exact thing too. Benefits of 148 without any new parts.

What?
What?
7 years ago

, actually much better then 148, stronger and stiffer frame and wheel without any heel rub.

the dude
the dude
7 years ago

I hate to spoil the party, but Specialized’s demo 9 had assymetric back in 05?

All-New Demo 8 frame with patented FSR suspension. Super low center of gravity and standover with subseatstay-actuated shock, full cartridge bearing pivots, 8.1″ of travel with full chainguide and front derailleur compatibility, plus 135mm wide asymmetrical 6mm offset rear triangle.

Walt
7 years ago

Steve at Bystickel was doing this in about 2005.

Eric E. Strava
Eric E. Strava
7 years ago

Regardless of who did it first, this is a damn good idea.

Johan
Johan
7 years ago

Recent feedback from Nico Pfitzenmaier on the JHB2C stagerace, 900km, was that it was the most comfortable and versatile bike he has ever ridden, with awesome handling.
Patric is a suspension master. I ride one of his creations, never been happier.

J N H
J N H
7 years ago

If this is the direction the industry takes in reaction to Boost then it’s fine by me.

GrandesRoues
GrandesRoues
7 years ago

If you use a boost148 frame and hub, with a regular (non boost corrected) ring on the crankset, then you get the same chainline, with a stronger/more rigid whell thanks to the spread out spokes…

shedfire
7 years ago

>Steve at Bystickel was doing this in about 2005.

Dave Yates in the UK was doing it in 1988.

tosis
tosis
7 years ago

wait, why is everyone so hyped on this spacing??? Forget any/all system wheels. Sure, building from scratch, no problem. But kiss all branded wheelsets goodbye.

It works, and likely works well for those users, but severely limiting in other ways.

Reformed Roadie
Reformed Roadie
7 years ago

Me thinks ‘the dude’ might work for SpecialEd.

JBikes
JBikes
7 years ago

I’m not sure I really care about the chainline given the performance of RD shifting on current bikes (i.e. great).
But the bikes themselves look pretty nice.

Drew Diller
7 years ago

Remember when Surly did this with the Pugsley and some people thought it was stupid?

Guess it wasn’t stupid.

Brian
Brian
7 years ago

Everyone cares about the spacing and no one going to comment on the angle of the seat on the blue bike??

Ck
Ck
7 years ago

@Brian: Clearly they’re trying to entice Kulhavy to quit Specialized and ride their bikes. I think they need to up their game with a -17 stem to really get his attention.

In all seriousness, i’d consider one of these if/when it becomes available in the US. The dishing change is a non-issue unless you’re married to factory wheelsets.

Madm3chanic
7 years ago

@tosis- why could you not do dished/branded wheels? it takes about 5 minutes with a spoke ke to dish a wheel…
i did it on a dually frame a few years ago to use a 150mm rear hub with a 73mm bottom bracket. it worked ok but id never do it again cause you cant swap any of your wheels over which is really annoying for a tinkerer like me

Bazz
Bazz
7 years ago

Good idea on the offset but when people say that you just need to dish your wheel I don’t think so. I think you will be up for new spokes as the lengths will change, might be able to reuse the spokes on one side on the other?

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