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QuietKat’s New Apex Automatic Transmission Adventure eBikes Offer Tons of Features

QuietKat Apex ebikes, hunter
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QuietKat says their new Apex HD and XD ebikes ‘redefine capability’, and with their lengthy list of features, it’s hard to argue with that claim. These bikes are built for adventurous explorers, so QuietKat has decked them out with features and components that ensure off-road capability and durability.

Internally geared automatic transmissions, motorcycle chains, 1000w motors with up to 200nm of torque, 30Ah battery options, switchable Class 1, 2, or 3 settings, 118 accessory mounting points, and even a dropper post with seat suspension are all found on the Apex ebikes. And that’s just the highlights…

Frame Features and Key Specs:

QuietKat Apex HD, side, field

The Apex ebikes are built around aluminum hardtail frames, and both models are available in Kick-through and Step-over options. The Kick-through style is roughly equivalent to a small-medium bike, and the Step-over (with the higher top tube) lines up with typical medium-large frames. The frame was redesigned for the Apex bikes to offer better accessibility and adaptability, and QuietKat says it’s their most rugged frame yet.

To ensure a comfortable ride, the Apex ebikes get air-sprung 120mm KKE inverted suspension forks and dropper posts with integrated saddle suspension. Both models roll on 26×4.8” Kenda Juggernaut tires for comfort on rough terrain and solid traction. Four-piston hydraulic disc brakes provide plenty of stopping power.

QuietKat Apex ebikes, rear rack

The Apex ebikes include QuietKat’s modular rear rack with class-leading load capacity (325 lbs). They can also host a new optional front rack and have a whopping 118 more mounting points to help haul your camping, fishing, or hunting gear (or tow a trailer). Rear fenders are included on both models. To further customize your adventure machine’s capabilities, QuietKat offers a whole line of racks, bags, and trailers.

Automatic Transmissions:

QuietKat Apex HD, hub motor

One significant feature of the new Apex ebikes is their automatic transmissions. QuietKat says they’ve found that most issues with off-road ebikes are related to damaged derailleurs and broken chains. The Apex ebikes’ internally geared automatic transmission eliminates the derailleur and allows QuietKat to use a beefy motorcycle chain. They say the motorcycle chain is almost impossible to break and transfers power to the rear wheel better than a traditional bike chain. The mid-drive Apex XD offers five gears, but the hub-driven HD model has just two.

Motor and Battery:

QuietKat Apex XD, mid-drive motor

The hub-drive or mid-drive Apex models are both powered by a 1000w VPO (Variable Power Output) 2.0 motor. If that wasn’t enough, the motors have a 1500w climb mode that boosts their output to tackle steep climbs. The XD’s mid-drive motor cranks out a massive 200nm of torque, while the HD’s hub-drive unit will produce 85nm. 

The newly developed VPO 2.0 firmware offers five drive modes: Eco, Trail, and Boost modes are now joined by new Climb and Stealth modes. What’s really nifty is how the VPO compliance technology can switch the bikes between Class 1, 2, 3, or unlimited modes, thus making the Apex ebikes legal on any trail. Of course, you might have to convince enthusiastic law enforcers you’re not going to use your throttle where you shouldn’t! On that note, the Apex ebikes feature a twist throttle.

QuietKat Apex ebikes, down tube battery

The Apex ebikes’ batteries are enclosed in the down tube, and buyers can choose between a 15Ah or a 30Ah version (both 48V). With a full charge, the 30Ah battery provides up to 90 miles of range.

Of course, the Apex ebikes feature integrated smart technology. Built-in cellular, GPS, and IOT capabilities allow remote tracking, alarm, and locking features. The bikes also provide real-time battery statistics, maintenance reminders, and over-the-air firmware updates. A color LED display shows your metrics/settings, etc.

Model Lineup:

QuietKat Apex HD – $2999-3599 (depending on options).

QuietKat Apex HD, angle

Frame color options for the Apex HD are Veil Relic Camo, Moss, or Dull Grey.

QuietKat Apex XD – $4499 – 5099 (depending on options).

QuietKat Apex XD, angle

The Apex XD’s frame color options are Charcoal, Red Clay, or Wideland Camo.

QuietKat Apex ebike, ice fishing

The Apex HD and XD are available to order now, with deliveries expected to begin in early June.

quietkat.com

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Matt
Matt
14 days ago

“Compliance” doesn’t mean “having an illegal feature but not using it”. Illegal is illegal and you can’t talk your way out of it, if law enforcement is actually enforcing the law. There is no such thing as “Class 1 & 2 & 3”; having all 3 options on one vehicle means it doesn’t fit the rules for ANY class.

Long story short, this thing is legally a moped. Stop pretending.

Geoff
Geoff
14 days ago
Reply to  Matt

idk bro, my car can go 150, but it never does

Matt
Matt
12 days ago
Reply to  Geoff

This is a false equivalence. There are no laws on maximum speeds cars are capable of (not in the US, anyway). But there are laws about what class of e-bike can be used where.

Geoff
Geoff
12 days ago
Reply to  Matt

not convinced braj, my car has an illegal feature (150+ mph), areas where I can’t use it (school zone), and is still compliant.

Paul Arlinghaus
Paul Arlinghaus
14 days ago

This is not an e-bike. Please don’t promote it as being an e-bike. This is why, as a long-time trail advocate and builder I am concerned about e-bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are a great story and have a lot of potential to get more people out on trails. But we all know that the end game isn’t class 1 e-bikes. It’s to crack the door open with Class 1 and then go straight to unrestricted electrified devices.

Dinger
Dinger
14 days ago

This product does not fall under the CPSC/federal definition of a low-speed electric bicycle as it’s 250W too powerful. 750W is the limit. I welcome it anyway because it is being chosen over fueled off road vehicles that weigh several hundred pounds more. e-bikes and light electric vehicles will continue to morph and change.

It’s worth remembering that there are still many who wouldn’t allow any e-bikes if they had their way so better to welcome those who want to play in this sandbox and figure it out as we go. More voices = stronger message.

threeringcircus
threeringcircus
12 days ago

Agreed. The spirit of an “e-bike” is that of a motor-assisted bicycle–something that provides a bit of extra power when needed, but is principally rider-propelled by turning the cranks. This and so many of the electric vehicles marketed as “e-bikes” are simply electric motorcycles. Sure, it’s got a crank, but it’s a red herring. Every day I see 2 or 3 teenagers piled onto something like this zipping down the street at 20mph without pedaling. If people want these, it’s fine, but they’re not bicycles and should be classified as motor vehicles when regulating where they’re used, how they are licensed and such.

Speshy
Speshy
13 days ago

Bike rumor has clearly does not understand who it’s readers are. No one here wants to run into a hunter with a scoped deer rifle on their local public trails, let alone one who has the power of an electric moped. No one here is reading these articles hoping to find equipment related to their next elk hunt.

bmx
bmx
13 days ago

missing a beer holder and gun rack.

Craig
Craig
13 days ago

Interesting machine. If this gets someone off a motorcycle or snowmobile then that’s positive. If it gets that same person occasionally out of their car for short trips to the local shop or local bar then that’s a double positive.

Speshy
Speshy
12 days ago
Reply to  Craig

Getting them off of a motorcycle and onto your favorite piece of single track…with a deer rifle. I don’t have anything against hunters, I just don’t want them on trails commonly used for hiking and mtb. They certainly deserve access but this vehicle enables them to better use those recreational sorts of trails instead of forest roads and I don’t think there is any real rule in place to keep them from using any trails on public lands. Another way in which ebikes ruin everyone’s experience.

David Suto
David Suto
10 days ago
Reply to  Craig

This vehicle is to bridge the gap between hoofing it by foot or riding an ATV or side by side back into the woods on private hunting lands. The problem is that a legal e-bike doesn’t have enough power to pull a deer over soft ground so they end up with an appropriately powered vehicle for the intended use that isn’t legal on most public spaces.

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