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Redshift Shockstop Seatpost springs saddle clamp change on way to production

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By now, you might have heard of Redshift Sports. The small outfit out of Philly has made a habit out of creating small, yet clever products to make riding more comfortable. Building on the success of the Shockstop shock-absorbing stem, Redshift has been working on a companion in the form of the Shockstop seat post.

Redshift Shockstop Seatpost springs saddle clamp change on way to production Redshift Shockstop Seatpost springs saddle clamp change on way to production

After launching through an incredibly successful Kickstarter campaign, Redshift is still taking preorders, with delivery expected by January 2019 (to be filled in the order received). But along the way, backers voiced their opinion that they wanted infinite saddle angle adjustment, rather than the fixed positions offered by the prototype’s lateral adjustment system. Now, the seatpost features a more standard two bolt adjustment cradle with a more adjustable angle.

Redshift Shockstop Seatpost springs saddle clamp change on way to production

The post will still retail for $199 (though you can pre-order it now for $159.99), and offers 35mm of travel with user adjustable spring rates and preload for tuning. Available only in 27.2mm diameter, the post will include a shim to fit your specified seat tube size.

redshiftsports.com

 

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13 Comments
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wally mann
4 years ago

soooo heavy…at that price, why not a Ti spring?

i
i
4 years ago
Reply to  wally mann

probably because the spring itself would cost twice what the whole post does. Not to mention steel springs are a lot easier to source in the quantities they’re likely selling.
How many people buying suspension posts are that worried about 70 or 80g anyway?

Maus Haus
Maus Haus
4 years ago

222g heavier then an FSA Energy post… 287g heavier then a KFL25 post. If every part on the bike was super light weight and you added a hefty seatpost to the mix then over-all it’s not a super heavy bike for non-racers. Also true that if your bike is a brick already, then it would not matter either…. but a person who has a brick might not pay $200 for a post either. Could see this being used for centuries or touring for all day comfort. I’m sure they will sell plenty of these post.

Bob
Bob
4 years ago

looks like the thudbuster is still the better option. same weight, proven reliability and probably more tune-able. Also the thudbuster comes in other seat post diameters. I have a Suntour suspenion post and the spring gets kinda loud after a while. i would rather have to deal with elastomers then the spring long term.

Heffe
Heffe
4 years ago

The Cane Creek eeSilk Post weighs 250 grams with 20mm travel.

mpulsiv
mpulsiv
4 years ago
Reply to  Heffe

Cane Creek eeSilk is 295 grams.
http://www.canecreek.com/product/eesilk

RobertW
RobertW
4 years ago
Reply to  Heffe

eeSilk only has a 330kg weight limit which puts me and all my friends out of the running.

ignis32
ignis32
4 years ago

497 g !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

N
N
4 years ago

I almost backed the kickstarter, but I don’t see any significant improvements over the design on the https://cirruscycles.com/ BodyFloat seatpost, of which I own 3 and they are AWESOME! That said, the seat rail clamp on the BodyFloat is a bit short, which I think contributed to bending my Ti seat rails when I flipped my bike over. Maybe if they come out with more options than 27.2mm, I’ll give one a chance against the BodyFloat. Rumor has it that they are releasing a dropper post version of the BF post early next year.

tyler robertson
4 years ago

Haven’t we done this before..?

Bill Danielson
Bill Danielson
3 years ago
Reply to  VM

Far from perfect. My understanding is that it also springs side to side making riding unstable.

Daniele
Daniele
3 years ago

Peccato che la mia Giant TCR abbia il tubo reggisella non tondo ma di forma a goccia e non posso sfruttare la vostra fantastica idea!!

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