Home > Bike Types > Cyclocross

Ritte Unveils Updated 2015 Crossberg Cyclocross Machine

19
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

Ritte Crossberg cyclocross bike cx (5)

While most of the country’s cross inclined are gearing up for a big weekend of racing, Ritte just sent over this chocolate morsel. Stepping in to replace the current Crossberg, the 2015 model sees slight changes to help you reach the podium without going broke.

The 2015 Crossberg continues Ritte’s quest to design a frame that has neutral manners and will fit a wide range of riders. Combining a shorter top tube, 425mm chainstays, and a “tighter than average” front center, the Crossberg claims to be agile yet stable through the entire size range. Still born from aluminum, the frame does make a departure from 6061 for the stiffer 7005 alloy which should handle all the punishment you can dish out.

Ritte Crossberg cyclocross bike cx (4) Ritte Crossberg cyclocross bike cx (3)

Even though most of the frame specifications stay the same on the Crossberg, one big change is the move to a tapered 1 1/8-1 1/2″ head tube. The 2014 model used a 44mm HT which still allowed the use of tapered forks, but the larger tapered HT should improve front end stiffness even more.

Ritte Crossberg cyclocross bike cx (1)

Elsewhere a PF30 bottom bracket remains in use, and the frame sticks with disc brakes but with QR axles front and 135mm rear. Framesets will ship with a full carbon Ritte disc fork with 160mm post mounts, while the rear can uses either 140 or 160mm rotors. All cable and housing routing is external and is compatible with both mechanical and hydraulic disc brakes. Ritte knows the Crossberg will be ridden in more than just CX races so the frame is speced with a 27.2 seatpost to squeeze out every bit of comfort possible.

Crossberg 2015 Geomtery

Offered in XS – 2XL frame sizes, framesets will retail for $1250 which includes the frame, fork, and headset.

rittecycles.com

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

19 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Terry
Terry
8 years ago

what is the largest rotor size that will work front and rear? whose using 140 rotors? do they actually slow the bike?

Alan
Alan
8 years ago

A 140mm rear rotor will be more than enough to slow a bike in a CX race. Disc brakes are already overkill in CX.

zeb
zeb
8 years ago

Most people on cross and road are using 140mm rotor. I think whether or not you’re using a sh*tty caliper/rotor combo is more important for stopping than 1cm of rotor radius.

CDG
CDG
8 years ago

Terry…I’m using 140mm rear/160mm front rotors on my Ridley’s, and that setup works well for me.

Digging the paint scheme on this bike!

Dan
Dan
8 years ago

Terry…I have been using a Hayes mech 140/160 config on my commuter for almost two years now (with big hills on the commute) and it has been stellar.

CXisfun
CXisfun
8 years ago

This is CX, give me 203mm front and rear b*tches!

Antipodean_G
8 years ago

@zeb is right, to a point. It also comes down to rider weight. At over 6′ and close around 87kg, a 140mm aint going to stop me well enough – I’ve tried. I need at least a 160 and on all my bikes, on or off road, I run a 203/160 as I found this to be the perfect size to pull me up.

What changes the performance at this point, as @zeb mentions, is the calliper itself – my XT’s are great, Avids OK but something like a Hope M4 can stop on a dime.

Jim
Jim
8 years ago

Stiffer 7005? Really..

lonefrontranger
lonefrontranger
8 years ago

yea that 7005 would beat the living heck out of anyone on the incredibly rough buffalo-grass-and-gopher-hole courses here in CO. source: had a 7005 boneshaker, sold it in favor of carbon.

greg
greg
8 years ago

main reason people go from 6061 to 7000 series is for the much simpler heat treatment process. some strength, stiffness gains, but largely offset with less ductility.

Large D
Large D
8 years ago

If you want 160 on the rear then use a bracket adaptor, easy to go bigger for those that need it.

Hotep
Hotep
8 years ago

“… stiffer 7005 alloy which should dish out all the punishment you can handle.”

craigsj
craigsj
8 years ago

My question is why would anyone use larger than a 140mm rotor in the rear? My road bike only takes a 160mm rear and I have trouble controlling it in a panic stop. The effort is way too light.

I’d use a 140mm rear on my 29er too if I could. Rear brake lockup is far too easy and I’m 200+ pounds.

sss
sss
8 years ago

Why would anybody want a sh*tty PF BB and oversized, too stiff a fork in CX?

badbikemechincx
badbikemechincx
8 years ago

I would have chose to paint it a different color than sh#$t brown. Ritte likes to be postmodern so perhaps the unfortunate color choice is intentional?

CXisfun
CXisfun
8 years ago

@Large D – not all frames can clear the larger rotor. For example, the chain stays on my bike have a little kink in them to clear a 160mm, but a 180mm rotor would hit my frame, no matter what caliper adapter i used.

john parker
john parker
8 years ago

nothing say we know cross like a big front chainring…..

sketch
sketch
8 years ago

in which universe do we find that shirking the top tube for a given size yields greater stability?

Brian
Brian
8 years ago

Unless you’re brakes are absolutely terrible, no one needs larger than a 140mm rear rotor for cross. There isn’t enough traction to use the extra power. And if there is that much traction, get of the f’n brakes!

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.