With the cobblestones of Paris-Roubaix on the horizon, the UCI has given Scope’s new Atmoz real-time tire pressure management system approval for professional road racing, offering mid-ride control over your tire pressure. Deflate your tires as you ride for improved comfort & grip over the roughest secteurs, and reinflate as you ride for improved handling & efficiency on smooth asphalt.

Scope Atmoz real-time tire pressure management system

Scope Atmoz real-time tire pressure management system, wireless remote control, components

c. Scope

Dutch wheel maker Scope has unveiled the Atmoz, an all-new real-time tire pressure management system that gives riders on-the-fly control over their tire pressure to optimize control & efficiency over variable road surfaces. Press a remote control button on your handlebar and you can add or remove air pressure in your tires as you ride to optimize performance no matter what type of surface you encounter.

With easily up to 30 wattage of reduced rolling resistance, combined with improved comfort and safety in rough and wet conditions, this product will be revolutionary for the cycling industry“, according to Scope.

Tech details

Scope Atmoz real-time tire pressure management system, wireless remote control, rear hub & hose on spoke

Details remain thin on the newly unveiled Atmoz tech, but according to the UCI’s statement, it appears to be more mechanically simple than the compressor-based Gravaa TPMS. It seems to be more of a reserve high-pressure air tank that would release air with each reinflation, via remotely operated valves. That would mean it can only be used to change tire pressure a finite number of times mid-race, before needing to be repressurized.

We do know that the USB-C rechargeable Atmoz hub device is connected via a pneumatic hose to a special control valve that seems to replace the core of a tubeless valve.

The system is compatible ONLY with tubeless tires, perhaps due to the lower resulting tire pressures – although it works with at least 92psi? (No rider weight limit, though.)  It’s also interesting to note that its operation is unaffected by sealant.

Scope Atmoz real-time tire pressure management system, wireless remote control, Wahoo display

The device(s) is wirelessly controlled by a pair of remotes (wired together with a shared battery & transmitter) that can independently raise or lower front and/or rear tire pressure.

It also communicates with cycling computer head units via ANT+ / Bluetooth, and can display live tire pressure at least on a Wahoo Elemnt Roam computer.

Scope Atmoz real-time tire pressure management system, wireless remote control, front hub detail

 

The Scope Atmoz device itself is a narrow clamshell design that clamps over the center of each hub, splitting in two so that it can be installed on a pre-built wheel. It is said to be compatible with “All 29” (700)” wheelsets, but that obviously will be hub dependent.

Scope Atmoz pricing & availability

Team DSM Joris Nieuwenhuis RVV

c. Team DSM

In order for the pros to be able to race it in the peloton, it has to be available to the masses, so you can actually order a  Scope Atmoz real-time tire pressure control system for the low, low price of 3998€. That’s presumably for the pair, and you can even get it in Black or Blue.

UCI authorizes built-in management systems for tire pressure

Pro cycling’s governing body issued a release yesterday giving the OK for in-race use of tire pressure management systems, retroactively dated back to April 1. But don’t worry, this isn’t an April Fool’s joke from the UCI.

Authorised in line with article 1.3.004 of the UCI Regulations, the tyre pressure management system is controlled by buttons on the handlebar and uses mechanical valves to regulate airflow between the air reservoir and the tubeless tyre. The system does not alter the structural integrity of the wheelset and does not contain any moving parts or compressors… In line with 1.3.006 of the UCI Regulations, the tyre pressure management system is also available commercially for all people practising the sport of cycling.

This narrow wording appears to specifically exclude Gravaa’s TPMS which uses compressors. But that’s likely only because UCI regulation prohibits the use of “technical innovation” during competition until the manufacturer specifically submits it for technical review.

Scope Atmoz TPMS, Paris Roubaix cobblestones prep

We expect that Scope’s Atmoz real-time tire pressure management system will likely show up next Saturday & Sunday at Paris Roubaix on the bikes of Team DSM who are a longtime partner with Scope, even though the currently race on Shimano wheels.

Team DSM mechanic Spring Classics prep

c. Team DSM

Follow along for more details and ongoing development at:

ScopeCycling.com

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16 Comments
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Jaap
Jaap
2 months ago

I want it, but 4k…

JL Oldguy
JL Oldguy
2 months ago

Why not just have an ebike racing category? Dropper posts, remote inflation of tires, just go ahead and add the motor? Fitness and athletic ability is just so passé.

George
George
2 months ago
Reply to  JL Oldguy

Your penny-farthing is right over here, sir…

Charles
Charles
2 months ago
Reply to  George

He does have a point though. Just look at all the support vehicles in the peloton today even. Add the bikes now with electric shifting, electric power meters, electric remote tire inflation… Just add a hard shell and some power windows for better aerodynamics. What is the point of the bicycle anyway? It’s a beautiful machine because the only power you need is yourself.

Tiago
Tiago
2 months ago
Reply to  JL Oldguy

Because dropper post are mostly mechanical 😀

whatever
whatever
2 months ago
Reply to  JL Oldguy

Or you can just worry about your own riding. If you don’t like the subject of an article, don’t read it.

blahblahblah
blahblahblah
2 months ago
Reply to  whatever

or you can just worry about your own thoughts, and if you feel like comments are going to be in agreeance with yours the don’t read the comments

whatever
whatever
2 months ago
Reply to  blahblahblah

something something about a pot and kettle

Jose
Jose
2 months ago
Reply to  blahblahblah

Or if you don’t like replies to negative comments don’t complain about other negative comments.

Mark
Mark
2 months ago
Reply to  JL Oldguy

Aside from your silly and incomprehensible mentality that innovation doesn’t belong in sports, what exactly do you think dropper posts and dynamic tire pressures would do to negate “fitness and athletic ability”? I’d love to hear this answer. Sounds like the opinion of a person that has never rode a bike or something.

Jose
Jose
2 months ago
Reply to  JL Oldguy

A small 500 watt motor quietly and cleanly powered by a battery means it’s still a total workout. Only people who have never really ridden an ebike assume it’s not. That there is only one way to be athletically skilled on a bike and not any other way could clearly be construed as elitist.

Brad
Brad
2 months ago

Coincidentally timely. I was just seeing where this was at the other day: http://whitecrow-tech.com/

Lance
2 months ago

It’s pretty cool, but I’d bet it won’t work in sub-zero temperatures.

Charlie
Charlie
2 months ago
Reply to  Lance

Why not? Air is still gaseous well below 0C, even 0F. It’s not like the valves should fail either.

Dosen
Dosen
2 months ago

Better get your wheels from the team car only for team DSM then in case of a flat…

Christian Lieske
Christian Lieske
2 months ago

What would be if the UCI decides one day there will be no longer a limit for tyre sizes anymore?