Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (5)

The most recent addition to the 27+ craze, Scott Sports is stepping up with a solid selection of plus sized bikes. Citing similar reasoning from other brands we’ve spoke with about the larger tires, Scott’s feeling is that the increase of traction, control, and tire stability outweigh any of the negatives. In fact, they claim that through their work with Schwalbe they have determined that the 2.8″ tire (on 40mm rim) offers an impressive 21% increase in contact patch with only 1% more rolling resistance. Cap that off with a “minimal” weight gain, and you start to get the picture.

Like most manufacturers we’ve seen jump into the plus sized waters, Scott has chosen to fatten up only a few of their models with a hardtail and full suspension frame both modified to accept bigger rims and tires. At this rate, it won’t be long until 27+ is as common as 27.5….

Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (24) Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (22)

Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (23) Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (28)

Clearly, stuffing the bigger wheel and tires in the frame requires some tweaking to the original design, but Scott attempted to keep the numbers as close to the standard frame as possible. In the case of the Genius 700 plus, the chainstays measure in at 445mm which makes them shorter than the CST on the Genius 900. Following the trend towards Boost, all Scott Plus sized bikes use 148×12 rear and 110×15 front spacing. That includes Boost spacing on the chainline with the chainrings moved 3mm outward but keeping the same q-factor as a standard crank.

Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (17)

Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (29) Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (20)

Built very similar to the standard Genius 700 Tuned, the actual weight difference between the two bikes is claimed to be around 400g (12.3 vs. 12.7kg). Focusing on a revised rear triangle mated to the original front triangle, the Genius Plus frames have been stiffened for the bigger tires and will clear up to 3.0″ tires. The geometries have changed slightly as well with the Plus bikes including a bit slacker head angle at 67.5º for the Genuis Plus and 65.8º for the Genius LT Plus (not available in U.S.). Taking the same path as Specialized with their Stumpjumper FSR 6Fattie, while the front triangle remains HMX carbon, Scott matches that with an alloy swingarm. Carbon molds are extremely expensive, and by using the same front triangle as other models along with inexpensive to produce aluminum rear triangles, companies like Scott and Specialized can produce Plus size full suspension bikes to test the waters without a massive investment.

Equipped with a new Twinloc remote and the Fox NUDE rear shock with the EVOL air sleeve, Scott continues their ability to offer on the fly travel and suspension adjustment. The two position air volume adjustment allows for 20% reduced wheel travel with 130 – 90 – 0mm of travel due to an actual lockout mode. Optimized for 1x drivetrains, the bikes are still front derailleur compatible for 2x gearing. Scott’s Plus sized frames are also able to run standard 29″ wheel which is definitely something to consider with the purchase of a Plus sized bike. Essentially two bikes in one, we’d imagine the Genius 700 Plus would be a pretty fun 29er given its shorter chainstays.

Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (4)

At the top of the heap for the U.S. market is the Genius 700 Tuned Plus. Running a Fox 34 FIT4 Factory fork set at 140mm of travel to match the rear’s 130mm from the Nude DPS EVOL Fox shock, the bike is decked out with a SRAM X01 Boost drivetrain, Shimano XTR brakes, Syncros TR1.5 45/40mm rims, and Schwalbe 27 x 2.8″ tubeless Easy tires.  Claimed weight is 13.3kg/27.12 lbs.

Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (10)

Available globally, but not in the U.S. is the Genius LT Plus which bumps up the travel to 160 – 100 – 0, with that zero representing a true lockout.

Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (8)

The next Genius Plus for the U.S. market is the 710 which drops the spec down a bit to lower the price. Still fitted with a 1×11 SRAM GX1 drivetrain, Fox 34 FIT4 140mm fork with Nude DPS EVOL rear, the 710 runs Syncros X-40 (40mm wide) tubeless ready rims with the same Schwalbe 27 x 2.8″ Nobby Nic/Rocket Ron EVO tire combination. Claimed weight jumps to 13.2kg/29.1 lbs.

Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (9)

Rounding out the Genius line is the 720 Plus which adds a 2×10 Shimano Deore drivetrain and SLX brakes. Suspension duties are still handled by a Fox 34 FIT4 fork at 140mm, and a Fox Float Performance Elite rear shock with DPS. While the other two Genius models are fitted with a RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper, the 720 runs an X-Fusion Hilo Strate post with internal routing. Wheel and tire setup is the same as the 710 with X-40 rims and 27 x 2.8″ Schwalbe rubber. Claimed weight is still a respectable 13.8kg/30.42lbs.

Scott plus genius 700 scale tuned 2015 2016 (3)

If hardtails are more your style, Scott will also be producing the Scale in the 710 and 720 Plus configurations. The aluminum alloy frame has a claimed weight of 1580g and is Boost compatible with a PF GXP bottom bracket and tapered headset. The higher end Scale Plus is fitted with a SRAM GX1 1×11 drivetrain, Shimano M506 brakes, a 120mm Fox 32 Float Air FIT4 fork with 3 position remote, and Syncros X-40 rims with Schwalve Rocket Ron Evo 27×2.9″ tires. The hardtail drops weight down to a claimed 11.8kg/26.0 lbs.

The 720 on the other hand runs the same frame but a Shimano 2×10 drivetrain, M425 disc brakes, and a Suntour Raidon RL-R air fork at 120mm of travel. Running the same wheels and rims as the 710, the 720 runs slightly different tires with the 67 tpi, Kevlar bead Performance series Rocket Ron 27 x 2.8″ treads. Claimed weight is still just 12.5kg/27.56 lbs.

Scott Genius plus geometry 2016

Scott Scale Plus geometry 2016

scott-sports.com

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meh
meh
6 years ago

I probably can increase the contact patch with 21% lowering the air in the tire with MORE than 21%. And yes – with more rolling resistance and smoother ride. So, the correct question here is where we need this increased traction with the same air level in the tire?

von.kruiser
von.kruiser
6 years ago

Guess I do not understand your comment so I apologize if I’m off base… but the larger tire and rim width lets you run lower pressure yet keep about the same rolling resistance and increasing the tire foot print for increase traction and smoother ride… with out pinch flatting as easy. Super fun to ride. Again I’m not 100% sure I understood your question.

Currently I run 2.35 tires on 35mm OD rims but 27+ is way larger and looking like more fun to ride. Personally I’ll wait for the lightweight carbon hardtail to come out w/ relaxed geometry. 27+ will run both regular 29″ wheels or 27+ wheels. Perfect for 29er, 27+ trail and bikepacking w/ 27+.

craigsj
craigsj
6 years ago

“27+ will run both regular 29″ wheels or 27+ wheels. Perfect for 29er, 27+ trail and bikepacking w/ 27+.”

Nonsense. This is a lie being pushed by the industry.

27.5+ with 2.8 or 3″ tires is significantly smaller in diameter than 29″.

It’s a shame that 29+ appears to be neglected in favor of an inferior wheel size.

meh
meh
6 years ago

Have two models – Kenda Small Block 8 26″x2.1 and 26″x2.35. Difference in size is ~12%, they both can be pumped to 5.6 bar. I usually ride them 3.5-4 bar everythere, but for DH parts (these tires are NOT for DH!) drop their air to ~2.5-2.8 bar. This on 36mm rim …
My point is simple – why should I buy tire which is probably 2x times more expensive than 2 of my tires, so I have more traction w/o loosing air?

Will
Will
6 years ago

Because @meh there marketing guys tell you so… Haha

TheKaiser
6 years ago

@von.kruiser, I think the Canfield EPO is pretty close to meeting your list of requirements, although you would want to confirm with them just how wide the clearance is for 27+ and corresponding rims.

meh
meh
6 years ago

@Will … OMG, I KNEW IT!

Wicked
Wicked
6 years ago

2,8 bar? are you kidding. My 29er have 1,2 – 1,4 ordinary with or without tubes 😀

meh
meh
6 years ago

@Wicked Are you talking to me 😀 If yes, probably you’re risking the rims and sidewalls of the tires at this pressure level, but it’s still possible to get some rolling … aaaand much resistance 😀

Mark
Mark
6 years ago

I just rode a hardtail Specialized Fuze 27.5 Plus and a hardtail Durango Hooey 27.5 Plus. Both these bikes were very good. So good that short travel rear suspension might not be needed. The King is dead (2 inch wide tire bikes), long live the new King (3 inch wide tire bikes)! My next bike will be “PLUS”!