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Shimano smart Sport Cameras automatically capture the best of your ride with Data Link

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While the action camera market is arguably still dominated by GoPro who essentially made helmet-cam footage commonplace, there continues to be innovation from a wide range of players. Now Shimano is the latest to bring new tech on top of their own camera introduced a few years back. The new CM2000 & CM1100 maintain the same lower basic form factor, but add in several new feature over their predecessor. Essentially deliver on current industry standard performance, the new cameras add video stabilization, plus the new standout feature – the ability to automatically start & stop recording based on preset thresholds from paired ANT+ sensor or even GPS location data. Get into the details after the break…

Shimano calls it Data-Linked Recording, and by working directly with ANT+ performance sensors or a GPS signal by way of a paired Bluetooth smartphone, the cameras can be programmed ahead of your ride to automatically start recording when things are about to get interesting. The main function is that you can preset for example a speed threshold so you wouldn’t have to sift through hours of recorded video post ride, when you really just want to capture that crazy fat descent. You can effectively set which characteristics define the most interesting aspects of your planned riding ahead of time, and the Shimano cameras can automatically start and stop recording, so you roll away with a pared down nights reel of your rides,without the need to edit.

That means no forgetting to start recording for an exciting section of the ride. You also won’t need to fumble to reach the camera when you have it in some creative. difficult-to-reach location to capture a unique perspective on your ride. You can set the ANT+ auto recording to be activated by a speed, power, heartrate, or cadence threshold, or even a set Di2 gearing combination.

Shimano sees that as a good way to capture your group’s reaction when you take off for a sprint, hit a key downhill or make it onto a scenic climb.

A side benefit of Data-Linked Recording is that it also means you get extended run time. Instead of battery and memory sapping continuous video capture, the auto recording means you’ll still have juice & storage space left for the exciting segments at the end of a long ride.

The new camera comes in two version the CM2000 & CM1100. The slightly larger 2000 adds the ability to pair with your GPS-enabled smartphone to keeps tabs on you physical location and record as you enter and exit a preset geofence (starting recording when you get within 10m of your preset start point.) The CM2000 also adds a special water repellant finish to the its detachable lens protector that is said to shed water droplets well enough to make it possible to record video in the rain without water spots.

Otherwise the internal tech of both cameras is the same. The 1440p, 30fps HD video recording is backed up by hardware image stabilization that promises stable, smooth video capture even for off-road riding. Both cameras have a water and dust resistant housing that protects the internals against contamination with a waterproofness rating to 10m, without the need for an additional protective case. The cameras also build in WiFi connectivity for their app-based mobile device setup and video uploads, as well as a D-Fly link that promises the ability to use satellite buttons building into Shimano shifters to also control the camera.

Audio looks to be captured in mono with the built-in mic on the top of the camera, and Shimano includes a foam noise filter to calm wind noise from riding at speed.

Of course collecting all the connected data means that it will be available as overlay stats when you manage your video and review it through the app. The app also gives the ability to control up to 5 cameras at a time, and provide live viewing to make sure you set the position and view of your camera correctly (with adjustable field of view, white balance & exposure). It even will work with both of the new cameras and the older CM1000. Finally Shimano has new desktop application for both Windows & Mac to let you get deeper into the final editing and data overlay of your videos.

In the box the 47x32x85mm, 103g CM2000 includes a clip-on, adjustable adhesive helmet mount that also builds in compatibility with the standard GoPro mount so you can use Shimano’s new camera with the vast majority of action cam mounts already on the market. Additionally a low-profile fixed angle helmet mount, side goggle mount, and PRO saddle rail mount will also be available.

Shimano is finalising the iOS & Android apps that will control the new cameras with introduction expected at the end of January. The cameras themselves are already in the process of making their way out to the distribution chains and are expected to be available to consumers once the apps are ready. Pricing is not yet available, but we will update when we know more.

Shimano-sportcamera.com

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KingDevin
KingDevin
6 years ago

I have missed capturing sections with my go pro. If the camera missed capturing the same section I would be even more mad. I mean i would hate to have it set up wrong and not work on the trail.

DougB
DougB
6 years ago

Nice, pre-editing.

Mike
Mike
6 years ago

Very cool feature to pre-set up start / stop points. I’m still rocking a gopro3, but would consider this for my next camera. Vy curious about pricing.

Nick
Nick
6 years ago

I get the idea, but surely you’d just end up with weird truncated footage that was missing the lead up to whatever event you were trying to capture? Set it to a specific speed… you just missed the start of your descent until you built up to that, presumably high enough speed that it didn’t start recording during regular riding on the flats. Set it to a specific power… that’s probably the best way to get it going at the right time but presumably you’d lose the build up and even when you started your big acceleration it would take a few seconds for the power meter to register the change and be sent to the camera and for it to then start recording.

Heart-rate seems even worse since it takes so long (comparatively speaking) for the heart-rate to increase after you start putting in a hard effort.

Seems like a better way to be able to only keep exciting footage whereby it would be recording all the time and just trim to a set number of seconds / minutes before and after the threshold was reached. That would still require it to be continuously recording though.

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