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Small chainrings get a small guard with new MRP Micro XCg

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Remember when bash guards were big? I do, mostly because I have a bunch of them hanging from a hook in my shop that I see every day. Back in the triple era, I would almost always ditch the big ring in favor of a bash guard – usually about the point that the big ring was worthless anyway after dragging it across every log and rock in the state. As drivetrains have changed, we’re more likely to see bash guards integrated into a chain guide on longer travel bikes, or as a bolt on guard that attaches to the frame instead of the crank like MRP’s XCg. I still have my original bottom bracket mounted XCg, though it doesn’t do much good for a lot of bikes these days in the time of the pressfit BB.

Now, in addition to the XCg V1 and V2, MRP has a new version of their bolt on guide specifically for smaller chainrings. Many riders are mounting up 30t or smaller rings to provide the low range to climb mountains, and at that size the standard XCg is a little overkill. The new Micro XCg is specifically designed for chainrings up to 30t, and is made from a single piece of 5mm aluminum plate. Since it lacks the added weight of a bolt on skid plate, the Micro XCg is almost half the weight of the XCg V2 at 46g. Made to fit ISCG 05 chainguide tabs only, the guard will both protect the ring from impacts and help protect the frame if the chain manages to come off the ring. MRP states that most installations don’t require crankset removal, and the guard sells for $49.95.

mrpbike.com

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fred
7 years ago

This is just weird. How likely is one to actually hit a 30t or 28t chainring??

Mr. P
7 years ago
Reply to  fred

I’ve hit it occasionally going over logs and a few rock rollers (30t). That said, the ring is so small (strong) and the chain is steel, I have had no damage. But this would give me piece of mind when I roll up on a log and have the sense it is going to hit.

P

bearcol
bearcol
7 years ago
Reply to  fred

Rocks popping up, but those typically hit the DT not the ring. I have had a rock pop up and break my mrp bash but my chain lube had weekend the plastic. The replacement prices mrp wants for parts like the bash, back plate, upper guide….. are too high. I wish they would take care of people that already spent a lot on their guides with low prices for replacement bits but we are talking about the bike industry.

Matt M
Matt M
7 years ago
Reply to  fred

I’m ride a lot of unmaintained, technical trail in NC and they are littered with boulders and fallen trees. I’ve dropped to a Wolftooth 26t stainless direct mount ring with stainless bash guard and I still hit it sometimes. When I encounter a larger tree at slow speed, I hop up and stall on the bash guard / rear tire, pivot forward, and then hop over the other side.

Rawk Guardin
Rawk Guardin
7 years ago
Reply to  fred

I’m a novice/intermediate, rider but I love to test and improve my skills in rock gardens. Granted we don’t have the super gnarly rocks in the Midwest that you can find in other areas, but still taller than my bottom bracket height. I have bashed my 30t ring on several rocks and realized that k actually damaged my chain causing a binding link. So if one bash guard can save me from replacing several chains (or worse, drivetrain components caused by a damaged chain) then count me in!

Smithhammer
Smithhammer
6 years ago
Reply to  fred

Nothing weird about it really, if you ride chunky tech terrain. Hitting a 30t ring is still well within the realm of possibility.

Alexander Sollie (@DF7)

I get that small production runs and lots of R&D make bike parts expensive, but $50 for a bit of aluminum with a few holes in it is pretty hard to swallow. Compare this to all sorts of non-bike related kickstarter projects with CNCed aluminum parts and you’ll see what I mean.

myke2241
myke2241
7 years ago

Kickstarter is for amateurs. This MPR we are taking about. The guard is probably well tested and will stand the up abuse give. Most cnc’ed Kickstarter use the cheapest quality aluminum. This is cnc’ed and hard andodized. The cost is really low and well worth the price!

Matt M
Matt M
7 years ago

You aren’t just paying for a piece of aluminum. R&D and CNC as you mentioned, but also polishing, anodizing, laser etching, packaging, marketing, and overhead. At full keystone, an item that costs $12.50 all-in is $50 to the consumer.

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