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SOC16: Gear roundup – OneUp’s Wide Range Di2, Gamut and Fourier’s Shimano 1x rings, more

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One Up Shark cage di2 shimano 10 50 derailleur cage cassette adapterIMG_3432

Some of the biggest news from Sea Otter had to be the introduction of Shimano’s XT Di2. The trickle down of Di2 technology to the XT price point should make the system a lot more accessible, but it still suffers from range envy, especially compared with SRAM Eagle. Fortunately, if you already have Di2 XTR or plan on getting the XT group, there’s already a solution – the Shark. It turns out that OneUp’s radically wide adapter system works just as well on Di2 systems making OneUp claim it as the widest range, electronic drivetrain available…

One Up Shark cage di2 shimano 10 50 derailleur cage cassette adapterIMG_3433 One Up Shark cage di2 shimano 10 50 derailleur cage cassette adapterIMG_3434

Just like the mechanical drivetrain, the Shark system includes a new offset derailleur cage that repositions the stock pulleys. When used with their 50t cassette adapter, you can either run an 11-50t, or add in their Mini Driver system with the right hub to obtain a full 10-50t drivetrain. We’ve been putting more miles on the Shark XT mechanical system and other than the aforementioned noise when at the extreme chain angles, it has been working flawlessly.

One Up Shark cage di2 shimano 10 50 derailleur cage cassette adapterIMG_3435

OneUp also offers XTR M9000 narrow wide chainrings that not only fit the odd BCD of the cranks and offer an improved 49mm chainline for the Shark system, but are finished in a way to make them blend right in.

oneupcomponents.com

Gamut point one pedals shimano xt xtr narrow wide chainrings black chainguidesIMG_3898

Gamut point one pedals shimano xt xtr narrow wide chainrings black chainguidesIMG_3900 Gamut point one pedals shimano xt xtr narrow wide chainrings black chainguidesIMG_3901

Gamut

Gamut also had some new narrow wide Shimano rings to show, and clued us in to a key difference between XT m8000 and XTR m9000. While the BCDs look similar, the XT ring is completely different and the two are not cross compatible thanks to a difference in how the rings attach to the chainring bolts. XTR rings are threaded for M9 hardware while XT rings use a standard chainring bolt set up. For the Gamut rings themselves, they are offered in black only because that’s the only color of the hard anodizing process which results in 50-100% more wear life compared to standard anodization. Offered in 30-36 and in even sizes, both rings sell for $64.99.

Gamut point one pedals shimano xt xtr narrow wide chainrings black chainguidesIMG_3905

For their chainguides, you’ll start to see their iconic red frames fade away as they move to all black due to consumer demand.

Gamut point one pedals shimano xt xtr narrow wide chainrings black chainguidesIMG_3902

Finally Gamut has a small update for the Podium pedals with new colors of pins, but also a stainless steel pin set in the works. New aluminum pins will be available in black, silver, red, and blue, and will be sold in sets of 40 for $20. As a side note, if you’re like us and got one of the very first sets of pedals (about 100 pairs according to Gamut), you may find that the aluminum pins mushroom and deform quite badly. Apparently a batch of pins snuck through without the proper heat treating which made them way too soft. If you are experiencing this, give Gamut a call and they’ll help you out.

gamutusa.com

fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4244

fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4245 fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4243

fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4247 fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4246

Fouriers

If you haven’t seen Fouriers Sweet Spot handlebar tech before, it’s a little odd but it actually feels pretty good in your hands. The very end of the bar has a slight bend to it right in the middle of the grip. This is said to aid ergonomics and provide better leverage, but it also makes it difficult to use certain grips – like lock ons. Because of that, Fouriers is adding a lock on grip with a flexible core that allows the grip to contour to the Sweet Spot. Aluminum bars are available in low rise and 680, 760mm widths, and there is also a 720mm bar with a 17 degree back sweep, each sells for $90. The lock on grips will be available in June for $18.

fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4238

fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4242 fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4241

fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4240 fouriers sweet spot curved handlebars lock on grips shimano chainrings oval narrow wideIMG_4239

Not to be left out, Fouriers also had some Shimano XTR and XT compatible chainrings in standard round, or oval shapes. The oval chainrings allow for three positions of adjustability with pricing set at $59.49 for XT and $66.49 for XTR compatible rings.

fouriers-bike.com

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ascarlarkinyar
ascarlarkinyar
6 years ago

Did you see the length of that rear derailleur? How about that the biggest cog is almost the size of the rim? The huge jump in gears?

Preposterous!

All to have the same range as a 3×9….

A fix for something that was not wrong to begin with.

Allan
Allan
6 years ago
Reply to  ascarlarkinyar

Exactly. I just don’t understand. Is this all because this is a new(ish) thing, to go 1x? We don’t have to rehash every argument pro and con, but I was thinking the exact same thing. So much effort to seemingly just move the chainring from front to back (ie-50T cog!). Whatever benefit there is to going 1x simply cannot outweight having the FD, and you won’t convince me otherwise. These cassettes now are ridiculous, as are the RD’s.

And BTW, I have a 1x (11-38 cassette) gravel bike, and it’s fine. It’s not any better or worse than a 2x drivetrain, it’s just different. But I would never completely switch to 1x, or consider these absolutely enormous cassette/RD combos.

Jon @ OneUp
6 years ago
Reply to  Allan

The cage length is in between a stock M8000 med and long cage and the jump percentages are on par with other 1X specific cassettes. That said, if you’re happy with 2X or 3X, stick with it.

the biz
the biz
6 years ago
Reply to  Allan

just so we’re clear, you’re refusing to use 1x because you think the cassettes look ridiculous? likely you wouldn’t convert an existing, working triple setup to 1x anyway even if it did appeal to you. But if you aren’t considering 1x drivetrain for a future new bike purchase, you’re going to be seriously limiting your choices.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
6 years ago
Reply to  the biz

How light is your 3×9? Do you ALWAYS shift the front derailleur to make for the ideal and most efficient chainline?

I agree, the 50T looks huge but so what? 29er tires looked huge before too. I run an E*thirteen 9-44(not that different from the 10-50) and its just about perfect. With my 32t, I’m rarely in the two smallest cogs and am only in the 44t for very brief moments or when I’m soft pedaling a climb with a friend. When my legs start getting older, I’ll be happy to have a 50t cog or if I didn’t have an xdriver, an 11-50 would be great…using the 50 as a bailout and spending a lot of time in the 42/44 or whatever it is(assuming I used a 34-36t cog to make up for not having the 9 or 10t). Yes, using a FD isn’t hard but its another thing to get jammed with crud, its a pain to clean, another thing to adjust(even though I’m a mechanic and its easy), and its weight you don’t need. Triple cranks are heavy, doubles are heavy compared to 1x and now, 1x has a wider range unless you’re using a 2x with one of these “almost as huge” cassettes.

John
John
6 years ago
Reply to  the biz

The problem with 1x is the gaps are massive, on the order of 20%. That’s OK for MTB, but for road or gravel it’s simply too much to give up over any sort of distance in an attempt to keep the same overall gear range. Let’s face it, 1x is a compromise, and for many types of riding a bad one at that.

mateo
mateo
6 years ago
Reply to  John

The only 20% jump is the 10 to 12 jump on a 10-42 (or 10-50) cassette. The rest are 13-17%.

For comparison, an 11-28 road cassette has gaps of 7-13%.

Everything is a compromise. Including front derailleurs (and rear derailleurs, and frame design, and suspension design, etc, etc).

gee
gee
6 years ago
Reply to  John

Even if what you’re saying was correct (it isn’t), the argument that MTB groupsets are only suited for MTB is…well…..et’s call it redundant

John
John
6 years ago
Reply to  John

@mateo: As someone who rides long cadence-based road and gravel miles, let me assure you there is a huge, real world difference between 13%-20% gaps and 7%-13% gaps. It’s more than just numbers on a page…

MTB, not so much.

John
John
6 years ago
Reply to  John

@gee: Road/CX/adventure bikes are already getting 1x drivetrains, so the discussion of them is fair game. Specialized is already selling drop bar bikes without FD mount options. 1x 10-50 will find its way to dropbar bikes in short order (you can quote me on that).

gee
gee
6 years ago
Reply to  Allan

That cassette is enormous because it’s a 46t ring stuck on to a Shimano cassette which only goes own to 11 teeth – the same range can be achieved with a smaller, neater SRAM 10-42 .

As for the benefits outweighing the FD – not having the FD is a benefit in itself Better chain retention, fewer cables, simpler (sequential) shifting, one less cable, reduced weight, easier maintenance, less mud stuck to your drivetrain…. all advantages. But above all else – you get much the same range as a 2x system with non of the redundant gears.

1x isn’t a new thing. Lots of us were running 1×9 and 1×10, for the reasons above 1×11 just removes the only real disadvantage

out for a ride
out for a ride
6 years ago
Reply to  gee

Don’t forget frame design benefits. Many manufacturers have one or two 1x only bikes because it frees up a lot of space for pivots and rear triangles to wander through their travel.

dustytires
6 years ago

I used to talk the same sh*t about 1X systems and held out riding a triple longer than most but in pursuit of a single use super light build I went 1X and after a few hours realized that I was just shooting off my mouth about big jumps (not road riding so don’t matter) and limited range, which I found didn’t hold water as long as I was actually mountain biking then Eagle killed that last argument. Basically unless you ride the road on your mtb a lot, or are uniquely weak etc a 1X system is excellent for actual mountain biking just get the low gear to match your terrain and physical needs and don’t downhill on the road!

Allan
Allan
6 years ago
Reply to  dustytires

Curious, do you run these enormous 50T cassettes? How much actual weight was saved (I’m asking sincerely)?

Jon @ OneUp
6 years ago
Reply to  Allan

About 250-300g over the the equivalent Shimano 2X system.

bearCol
bearCol
6 years ago

I remember when I thought a 42t cassette looked crazy big. Well, actually a 42t cassette is crazy big, (deleted). I get it, 1×11 isn’t enough range for some people but making the cassette even bigger isn’t the right way to deal with that.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
6 years ago
Reply to  bearCol

E*thirteen’s 9-44 is amazing. I’m hoping they go to 1×12 and do something like a 9-46. I love that they’re the price of SRAM’S second tier cassette but lighter and has replaceable cogs.

Tupac
Tupac
6 years ago

1X = Better suspension design, fatter tires, less weight, no shifting problems, no chain suck, shorter chainstays… should I keep going?

elvis
elvis
6 years ago
Reply to  Tupac

yeah, no problems whatsoever…

fotos dot mtb-news dot de/p/1997578

btw, how does 1x eliminate chainsuck?

preston
preston
6 years ago

I wish these companies were making replacement 2* compatible rings for the new Shimano BCD. The Shimano options don’t cover everything and are expensive and hard to find.

FD for life !

ted
ted
6 years ago

One can purchase Gamut on Walmarts online site as being sold by Bikewagon. Awesome! Another reason not to have to go to the shop.
http://www.walmart.com/c/brand/gamut

Jeff
6 years ago

On a 3x or even a 2x, do you realize how many of those gears are redundant? On 1x, all the gears are useable and non-redundant. For me, I’d rather have less choices where everything is useable, than have 27 choices where only about 10 or 12 of those choices are useable. But the choice is up to each individual, if 3x works for you, stick with it, you will not be forced onto 1x unless you buy your next new bike from anywhere else than Walmart.

Tman
Tman
6 years ago

Those handle bars are nothing new, Haro had the Wingbar with that bend 25 years ago!

ed
ed
6 years ago

12-40 10 spd rear 22-32-44 with middle and inner rings elliptical. Best drive train ever. and that is on a 21.9lb 29’er. Tried 1x, I’m sticking to my 3x thanks very much. I will take goo d care of my gear so I can wait this fad out, and the industry will come back around to 2x.

Vincent Edwards
6 years ago

Running shimano Di2 w/ the E-thirteen 9-44 cassette could be an appealing option. Range close to 500% (I think its around 480%) without stretching the rear derailleur past it’s intended range. 9 and 10t cogs aren’t that fun to pedal in, but for most that’s not going to get as much use as the Low range anyhow.

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