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Speedsleev Ranger puts a new spin on the saddle bag

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Quick, name your favorite saddle bag. That will probably be difficult for a lot of us, because first, you need to have a saddle bag, and second, you need to have one you actually like. Like a lot of friends and fellow riders, the crew from Speedsleev simply weren’t happy with the current state of the saddle bag – or seat pack as they like to call it. It seems a bit crazy that something so simple still manages to disappoint, but designing the ideal seat pack is more difficult than you’d expect. It has to be big enough to be useful, yet small enough to not get in the way. Let’s face it – it also has to look the part so you’re not embarrassed to show up to your group ride with a giant tumor hanging off the back of your saddle.

After more than a year of testing and development, the Ranger is Speedsleev’s answer. Small, easy to install and remove, and purpose built, this is a seat pack you may actually want to run…

Essentially the covered evolution of their current Seatsleev, the Ranger seat pack uses a water proof cover to keep the goods dry. Made from ballistic nylon, the sort of clam shell cover slips over the contents and stays in place with a velcro strap. The pack is then attached to the seat with two large velcro straps that tighten everything down, helping it to keep a narrow profile. The design also allows for Speedsleev to call it the lightest and tightest fitting seat pack.

Designed to carry 1-2 tubes depending on the size, there are also compartments built in for two tire levers, two co2 cartridges, and a small multi tool. Just the essentials.

Up for funding through a meager Kickstarter looking to raise just $4,500, the Ranger can be picked up for as little as $20. Backed by a no questions asked warranty, the packs are expected to ship by March/April 2017 provided the Kickstarter is successful.

speedsleev.com

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26 Comments
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Dave
Dave
6 years ago

Where do you get 18 or 20 gm CO2cartridges and where does the inflator head go?

JG
JG
6 years ago
Reply to  Dave

Inflator head was my first thought when looking at the setup.

DH
DH
6 years ago

This will still destroy your bibs.

Ben Weaver
Ben Weaver
6 years ago

I’ve been using Speedsleev products for several years now. All have been wonderful, even ran one on my DH bike for a day:) Whether I was on the road, or mtb’ing, the products have been there, and never obtrusive,…or noisy. Since the summer I’ve been using a Ranger on my Fargo and it’s been nothing short of spectacular!
GO SPEEDSLEEV!!!

Eric
Eric
6 years ago

@Dave – My shop sells 20g CO2’s. Shouldn’t be hard to find. I have two regular Speed Sleev’s and usually leave the inflator head attached to one of the CO2’s when I slip it into the little elastic spot. I usually tighten it all the way down which risks expelling some of the air if you press on it by accident, but with the cover of the Ranger, you could probably only thread it on a few turns and not actually puncture the canister and the cover would keep it from falling out.

Rob Allen
Rob Allen
6 years ago

Dave- The Ranger fits 16g as well or even 12g Co2’s if your prefer. Companies like QBP MSW brand are making 18-20g versions for for higher volume road applications. There is enough room in with tube/tubes in main compartment for the inflator head or in the side pocket where the multi cool can go. With the Ranger we believe we have checked all the boxes and we have worked with cyclists from all over the world to give them exactly what they want. Cheers!
Rob
Speedsleev Inc.

Timmy Apples
Timmy Apples
6 years ago

DH – I’ve never had my shorts/bibs damaged by a saddle bag in many years and many different equipment combos. What on earth is happening to yours?

Scott Bendle (@ScottBendle)
Reply to  Timmy Apples

For me it happens from the strap that typically goes around the seat post, the velcro abrades the shorts on the inside of the thighs. This design does get rid of that issue, so good job!

Mark M
Mark M
6 years ago

Don’t forget to put a strap on the back for a blinky/tail light. And keep it up towrds the seat not too far down.

Jack Tors
Jack Tors
6 years ago

That is some next level stuff!

Thor29
Thor29
6 years ago

I’m one of those weirdos that doesn’t use a hydration pack on my mountain bike. When I installed a dropper post, I needed some way to carry my repair stuff that didn’t have a loop around the seat post shaft. So I tried the Awesome Strap from Backcountry Research. I wanted to love it like so many other people do, but when I hit some rougher trails than I normally ride, my stuff got ejected all over the trail several times. Maybe I didn’t do it right, but I don’t think such things should be overly finicky in application. This looks like a much better solution to me. Good job guys!

PFS
PFS
6 years ago
Reply to  Thor29

While this does look like a good solution, I have never had a problem with the backcountry straps. I’d like to think that I’m rad as hell! But maybe you go harder…

SpeedyG
SpeedyG
6 years ago

Rob, how does it work with dropper seatpost ?
My current pack sometimes touches the tire when the suspension compresses going Dh with dropper all the way down .

Rob Allen
Rob Allen
6 years ago

DH, this will not contact your shorts or destroy them, thanks bringing the topic up though.
Cheers,
Rob

dustytires
6 years ago

this looks over thought, and well done at that. My Backcountry Research straps over the years have never lost a single thing. Problem is that it works so well I get lazy and forget to put new tubes in now and then as I know that invariably they will crack at the folds if left too long. I have been using Sahmurai Sword plugs the last 2 seasons and cannot remember the last time I actually used a tube in a race. If I pinch or small cut a sidewall now, a mini pump in pocket for a couple dozen strokes after a plug install and gone.

Rob Allen
Rob Allen
6 years ago

SpeedyG-Thats is always a great question and really depends on bike, tire, saddle and suspension. With that said we have been testing them on everything we can get our hands on for over a year including Santacruz, Yeti, Cannondale, Pivot etc. and I have not had any tire scrub. The Ranger sits pretty high and tight when fully loaded. Hope that helps.
Rob

Rob Allen
Rob Allen
6 years ago

Thor29- The main difference between the other brand you mentioned and even some of our own other products is there is simply no way to carry this much, this tight and completely enclosed from the elements. It will not disappoint and I have personally tested along with a number of pro cyclists in all conditions possible to make sure. Thanks, Rob

Stendhal
6 years ago

Rob — great job! Even a Velominati should appreciate your discreet and functional saddle bag solution. Yours is the first Kickstarter I have ever supported.

Peder
Peder
6 years ago

Put a strap on the back for a tail light maybe even a small pocket for the multi tool….

Beatstreet
Beatstreet
6 years ago

I backed it on KS. KS, has been cruel to me in the past. I’ve had one item never delivered and another a year “late”. A recent bell was spotted on the open market for sale just before we received our bells andcheaper than our “backed” price. When we got our bells, they were nearly silent. Here’s hoping to an near on time delivery and a great product.

mudrock
mudrock
6 years ago

I signed up. First seat bag I’ve seen that straps stuff down so it doesn’t rattle, and I hate bags that strap around the post, wearing of anodizing (black alloy posts) or clearcoat (carbon).

Don’t worry about taillight strap – your bag won’t support it anyway. They belong on post, where they can be strapped securely. A tip for gen2 of the Ranger: a sleeve for smartphones. They are getting so big and heavy, they bounce around in my jersey pocket, or stretch the jersey down near my ass on the looser ones (hate that!).

Rob Allen
Rob Allen
6 years ago
Reply to  mudrock

Thanks for backing, much appreciated! You will be stoked! We actually have a prototype of a larger version called the Lone Ranger that will fit plus tubes and your phone would fit in there if you are so inclined. Thanks, Rob @speedsleev

Rob Allen
Rob Allen
6 years ago

Beatastreet-I hear you on that! Be reassured we have our priorities in line as well as proper production. We will execute and deliver on this project like we have done for all the other models we sell! If anything the finished product is even better and cleaner, the one in the picture is a production sample that was ridden by myself for a year prior to the photo shoot.
Thanks for backing the Kickstarter, you will not be disappointed. Cheers,
Rob

Rob Allen
Rob Allen
6 years ago

Stendhal- Thanks, I have subscribed to the Rules for quite some time, however, this one constitutes bending Rule #31 a bit…. Cheers, Rob @speedsleev

Rob Allen
Rob Allen
6 years ago

Peder- There is a pocket for a multi tool in there. As for the light loop…we had one on the original prototype and after many cyclists opinions we dropped it off due to the fact of most lights getting bigger and mounting to the seatpost or the stays. Thanks! Rob @speedsleev

mech9
6 years ago

been using speedslev’s on my road and adventure bikes for a couple years now.. Great products.. the funny thing about this ranger (which looks nice for mtb’ing) is that they have literally come full circle. They designed the speedslev to get away from the traditional saddle bag look. They went with that backcountry or velcro strap minimal look/feel but with better holding of your tubes and co2 with the elastic. Now with this weather proof hood that goes over the slev they are basically making a saddle bag. :). Kind of funny.

BTW this looks better than their current mtb solution. The mtb speedslev looks tacky and ugly and real bulky.. Still love the road one though.

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