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Spy Shots: upcoming DT Swiss PR1400 OXiC Dicut lightweight alloy road wheels

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DT-Swiss_PR1400-OXiC-Dicut_light-aluminum-alloy-road-wheels_overall

We happened to be riding in the Alps a couple of weeks back and spotted a set of new aluminum wheels being tested in the real world by a rider from DT. While DT Swiss has completely revamped their mountain bike wheel line-up this year with the new Spline One range, we didn’t expect to see too much new on the road side of things. That said they are clearly working on some new tech, not just for the advent of disc brakes and the ever-expanding carbon wheel market. What we first noted on these wheels was the lack of the visible brake track. That got us asking questions, and we came away with some interesting info about the new OXiC coating that offers improved braking and durability. Take a closer look after the break…

DT-Swiss_PR1400-OXiC-Dicut_light-aluminum-alloy-road-wheels_rim

What we have learned is that the new wheels use an innovative oxidized, ceramic treatment that is applied to the complete rim, much like anodizing, but after the braking surface is already prepped (machined?). The result is a matte black ceramic coating that is more flexible than the ceramic braking surfaces we used back in the 1990s, yet delivers that same improved braking feel and with greatly improved durability. It looks like something quite similar to Mavic’s Exalith treatment without requiring the extensive textured machining of the brake track, although we are told that the technology is fairly different in both the process and the material coating itself.

We rode with the DT rider on some steep descents (under sunny skies on asphalt and gravel) and the brakes seemed to offer him a good level of control, while not making a noise. Quiet running was certainly not something the first generation of Exalith was known for.

DT-Swiss_PR1400-OXiC-Dicut_light-aluminum-alloy-road-wheels_hub

This OXiC coating is applied just to the rims, but the entire wheelset gets similar look for a stealth appearance. That means a special hub treatment for the aluminum Dicut hubs and different alloy endcaps, and even sandblasting the stainless steel bladed spokes.

DT has stated that this is the first set of wheels to get the new OXiC tech, which suggests that we might see it on a broader offering of wheels soon. The process works much as hard anodizing does, by submerging the alloy rim into a solution and then passing a current through it. What separates it from hard anodizing though is that this OXiC process creates a reaction that super heats the rim surface so that it produces a smooth oxide layer as it cools that is much more durable and more consistent across complex shapes. DT Swiss even goes on to say that the surface is so hard that it will not wear off over the entire life of a wheelset, even with the regular grit that the pads pick up when you ride. At the same time, since the OXiC is part of the rim material’s surface instead of just a coating, it is able to deform with the rim without cracking, making it much more durable than baked on ceramic coatings.

The wheels do require special pads and DT includes them with the OXiC wheels, and will sell them aftermarket as well.

DT-Swiss_PR1400-OXiC-Dicut_light-aluminum-alloy-road-wheels_Alps

The wheels look otherwise very similar to DT’s current RR21 Dicut in size and shape, with the same 18mm internal, tubeless-ready rim width and asymmetric 21mm deep profile, and will take over the top position as DT Swiss’ premier alloy road wheelset.

DT-Swiss_PR1400-OXiC-Dicut_light-aluminum-alloy-road-wheels_rims

With a claimed weight of just 1435g (635g front, 800g rear) they are just 20g heavier than the RR21 and will sell for 998€/$1286. While not cheap the PR1400 Dicut OXiC wheels could make for a light all-rounder, tubeless-ready wheel for those who really want to get the best rim-brake stopping, once they become available in the first week of September.

DTSwiss.com

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Anonymous
Anonymous
6 years ago

Despite the stealth coating, what’s the difference with RR21?

rosey
rosey
6 years ago
Reply to  Anonymous

you answered your own question. surprised to see they didn’t go to 23mm rims. maybe that’s next, after they use up the existing inventory of 21mm?

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
6 years ago
Reply to  rosey

Rosey- note the inner width is 18mm, like most 23mm rims. This is for sure not about “using up the existing inventory”, since it uses a brand new rim.

Joe
Joe
6 years ago

Are these really “spy shots” if you already have the dimension, weight, and price data?

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
6 years ago

I was sitting here reading the article and thinking “I hope this coating is more durable than the old Mavic ceramic rims” which I both cracked and wore through. Then I saw this:

Article quote – DT Swiss even goes on to say that the surface is so hard that it will not wear off over the entire life of a wheelset, even with the regular grit that the pads pick up when you ride. At the same time, since the OXiC is part of the rim material’s surface instead of just a coating, it is able to deform with the rim without cracking, making it much more durable than baked on ceramic coatings.

If they’ve been able to pull that off, and are willing to replace rims on which the coating fails, then that is pretty dang impressive.

Rixter
6 years ago
Reply to  TheKaiser

It’s an easy claim to make, much more difficult to backup with a lifetime warranty on the coating

Aaron
Aaron
6 years ago

Awesome wheel in every way, but too narrow in my opinion.

Thesteve4761
Thesteve4761
6 years ago
Reply to  Aaron

If 18mm wide internally is too narrow for a wheel designed for 23-25mm tires, what is “wide enough”? Truly curious.

Marcelo Cunha
6 years ago
Reply to  Thesteve4761

LoL

Allan
Allan
6 years ago

Is 1435g considered lightweight for a $1,200+ wheelset?! This coating better be the greatest thing since sliced bread, because I can, and have, put together an alloy wheelset sub-1,350g for under $1,000…

Also, 21.5mm is too narrow in today’s market. We’re pushing 27mm now!

Josh
Josh
6 years ago
Reply to  Allan

The internal width, which is what actually matters, is technically wider than a Zipp 303. So I don’t see how they’re not wide enough? Would you prefer an excessive brake track width to meet your outer width standards?

Allan
Allan
6 years ago
Reply to  Josh

Well, specifically, the Pacenti SL23 is 20.5mm internal, 24.5mm external, which is becoming the gold standard for alloy aftermarket rims. There are others which are at, or exceed 20mm internal width.

Having ridden many different alloy rims, I prefer wider rims, and so does the market, apparently…

EcoRacer
EcoRacer
6 years ago
Reply to  Allan

I don’t see the point in designing a rim for road bikes with 20.5 mm inner width? That is so far out of the ETRTO safety recommendations that it’s just dangerous with the wrong tires. 18mm internal width is plenty for 25 or 28mm tires. This a road wheelset not a CX or 29er wheelset! But it’s a free world, if you want your tires to blow off the rim at high speed, be my guest, I’m not going to stop you.

ascarlarkinyar
ascarlarkinyar
6 years ago

Too narrow, harder surface will create more heat, good bye tire while braking down long fast decents.

Should be working on disk brake wheels not this. Using up old stock to sell it off before no one will buy it.

EcoRacer
EcoRacer
6 years ago
Reply to  ascarlarkinyar

What’s with all the negativity here?

It is not too narrow at all, 18mm is more than wide enough for it’s intended use. (Which is road bikes).
I’m sure DT Swiss has done the necessary test regarding safety and heat build-up. Their HQ is right next to the Swiss mountains in Biel, where they test all their equipment. They also have numerous testing benches for testing heat/fatigue/braking force/ tire pressure etc.

But of course, if you say it doesn’t work, we should believe you right?

And last time i checked, they already have several disc wheels available for the last year and more coming.

fib
fib
6 years ago
Reply to  ascarlarkinyar

Wait a minute…

Do you tell us that everyone should blow their tires downhill with older – narrow – rims? I went three days in the Alps, my Mavic rims have an inner size of 15mm, 19-20mm outer, and I’m sure I didn’t die or blow anything.

That is wrong.

exfictitiouz
exfictitiouz
6 years ago

Curious how is this a ‘spy shot’ when you even have the schematics with dimensions and exact weight and pricing and availability to show?

Lane Cross
Lane Cross
6 years ago

Too narrow! Still! It’s definitely trying to reinvent old a** rims.

Jeffrey
Jeffrey
3 years ago

What kind of brake pads is use in dt swiss pr1400 dicut oxic 21 clincher road wheels?

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