Home > Bike Types > Road Bike

TDU 2016 Tech: Adam Hansen’s Lotto Soudal Ridley Helium SL

22 Comments
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-1

Earlier in the week, we interviewed one of Lotto Soudal’s mechanics, Steven Van Olmen. Steven is the man supporting the Lotto Soudal team at the 2016 Tour Down Under, and the Ridley Helium SL of Adam Hansen is one of many team bikes under his care.

In 2004 and 2005, Adam won one of Australia’s toughest off-road events, the Crocodile Trophy. From there, he has gone from strength to strength. He joined the pro-ranks in Europe in the mid 2000’s, and last year broke Bernardo Ruiz’s 68 year old record for the number of consecutive grand tours completed. Adam’s finish at the 2015 Vuelta a Espana marked his thirteenth grand tour finish in a row – an amazing accomplishment! But Adam isn’t just a record breaker, he’s a bike tinkerer and software developer, too…

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-8

The first thing that is glaringly obvious about Adam’s bike is his unorthodox choice of saddle and extremely aggressive saddle to handlebar drop.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-14

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-9

The Selle Italia Kronos saddle was first used at the 2015 Tour De France, and is typically meant for use on a time trial bike. But when you’re Adam Hansen, you look outside of the box to take advantage of the forward position the saddle offers. The saddle also features anti-slip technology to keep Adam firmly in place. Take note of Adam’s Deda Drittissimo zero seatback seatpost, almost never seen in the pro ranks.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-10

The aggressive nature of Adam’s position also extends to the handlebars, which measure 38mm in width, and the stem being a Deda Pista Zero100 track unit.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-6

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-7

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-11

The Deda Pista Zero100 stem is a 67º stem, or -23 down if you prefer. In other words, Adam’s Deda stem slopes downwards.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-15

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-12

Adam’s position aside, the rest of the bike is pretty standard. Campagnolo supply Super Record EPS groupsets and Bora Ultra Wheelsets to the team.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-4

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-2

Lotto Soudal is one of the many teams supplied by Continental for tires. The team uses the Pro-only Competition Pro LTD tubular tire in a 25mm width.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-5

Unlike so many team bikes in the peloton, Adam’s bike isn’t fitted with a power meter. Why I hear you asking? Adam rides 180mm crankarms, and SRM only fits power measuring hardware to Campagnolo’s 170mm – 175mm cranksets. A big thank you to Adam himself for clarifying this!

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-3

On the subject of technology, all of Lotto Soudal’s logistics software, which handles the comings and goings of everything related to bikes and equipment, was written by Adam. Clearly he is more than just a talented bike rider.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-13

Braking duties for Lotto Soudal’s road bikes are handled by the venerable yet elegant, Campagnolo Super Record rim brake. Bottom brackets receive an upgrade courtesy of C-Bear ceramic bearings, who have been supplying the team since 2009.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-17

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-16

Ridley prefers to keep things accessible and simple with the Helium SL, with rear brake cable routing running along the top tube, a feature I am sure Lotto’s mechanics truly appreciate.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-18

Be sure to catch the Lotto Soudal team as they kick off their 2016 season at the Tour Down Under in Adelaide, South Australia.

LottoSoudalRidleyHansen2016-19

Photos and article by Gravel Cyclist.
Jayson O’Mahoney is the Gravel Cyclist: A website about the Gravel Cycling Experience.

Lotto Soudal

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

22 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Durianrider
Durianrider
8 years ago

I did 100k+ with lotto on a hills ride last week and noticed that AH rocks his hips a lot when he pedals. I reckon a few mm lower would sort that.

That is an impressive GT participation record. Epic stories to be told Im sure.

Pit
Pit
8 years ago

Hella drop! All those back to back tours, he is doing something right. All the upright Allans must hate the setup of this bike. I like it. Smalled as hell. It’s modern, low and forward. I use a similar pos with an ISM saddle. The guy pays a lot of attention to his fit and kit, down to the Hanseenos and lots of data analysis. Another thing is tha this is on the extreme edge of aggressive. And in that case, a week with tight hams or a couple mm like Durian suggests can sure cause issue like rocking. Also sometimes that sh*t can get sorted with a break in period or re-acclimation period. I imagine the guy has to re-adjust to this after a semi-resting period (holidays, etc).

OverIt
OverIt
8 years ago

How he rides with that much drop I’ve no Idea. Must have looooong arms!! 🙂

OriginalMarkV
OriginalMarkV
8 years ago

Just a question about handlebar width: Is that 38cm Deda’s labelled width or measured center-to-center? Deda gives their handlebar sizes in outside-outside measurements, so a Deda “38” is actually about 35.6cm center-to-center. The “38” size is the narrowest that Deda makes a Zero100 handlebar. I just want to know how extreme Adam’s choice is.

Jeb
Jeb
8 years ago

Yeah, he’s a pro blah, blah, blah, but that bike is a mess.

Myke
Myke
8 years ago

@Jeb your right. Makes you wonder how committed teams are on proper fittings.

ereyes
ereyes
8 years ago

Wtf is going on with that whoopie cushion/seat!

Antoine
Antoine
8 years ago

I’m guessing adam position when he is on attack mode is hand on the top with flexed arms which has been measured the fastest. He must rarely use drops, only to rest in the pack while staying low. It makes sense that way. That said it’s obvioulsy a mess for climbing.

JD
JD
8 years ago

“Ridley prefers to keep things accessible and simple with the Helium SL, with rear brake cable routing running along the top tube”

Really? On a bike where the shifting cables can be routed internally, this sounds more like a case of cost-saving or engineering laziness, neither of which should come into play on a frame of this price.

lak
lak
8 years ago

Short femur, long tibia, long arms – my bike looks the same.

Pit
Pit
8 years ago

Oh yuh the guy who did 13 tours back to back must be wrong. You guys have no idea who he is or hos meticulous he is about his fit and gear lol. Slam it.

Erich
Erich
8 years ago

JD, external routing is typically lighter overall from a system perspective.

Colin
Colin
8 years ago

External routing is also the preferred method when you talk to people who actually work on bikes which get ridden a lot and in all conditions. Internal routing has gotten easier, and there are certainly tricks to make things go smoother, but with external routing the hardest part of replacing the cable and housing is wrapping the bars.

“Ridden hard and put away wet.” doesn’t even begin to describe what training bike go through.

Pistolero
Pistolero
8 years ago

Funny how all commenters pretend to improve Adam Hansen position, Adam being the nerdest cycling rider in history. He doesn’t choose a comfortable or healthy position, he chose a position that is aero, and highly efficient. The aero advantages he must get with this must be 200 timer bigger than the difference from an aero frame from a climbing frame. And I bet he gets the comfort by the energy saved, rather than having a biomechanics position.

this bike should have a big sticker “F@#ck you all biomechanics”. This guys do all the GT one after another, mind you. He must be the pro rider with less miles on his legs though, he’s weapon is recovery. And he helps his team, his sprinters, and he wins some stage in a GT almost every year.

bpt
bpt
8 years ago

fast does not equal smart

Alb
Alb
8 years ago

If bikes could talk….

pTymnWolfe
pTymnWolfe
8 years ago

I think everyone missed the part where he’s completed thirteen Grand Tours in a row. Don’t you think he would know more about what works for him than you would know what works for him?

Adam
8 years ago

Go easy on my position…. there is a tad of science in it…. 😀

cyclingdude86
8 years ago
Reply to  Adam

mic drop, walks off stage

Chris
Chris
8 years ago
Reply to  Adam

Boom.

AndyH
AndyH
8 years ago

^^^ This!

David
David
8 years ago

No mention of Adam’s wicked custom and DIY shoes! Adam, if you read these comments again, Are you positioning the “cleat” furthr back on your foot than a regular shoe would allow? 180mm cranks FTW!

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.