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TDU 2017 Tech: Mads Pedersen’s Trek-Segafredo Madone 9 Race Shop Limited

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Trek-Segafredo is an American professional cycling team, originally founded in 2011 under the name Leopard Trek. The team has gone through various iterations of named and presenting sponsors, but Trek’s purchase of the team in 2014 sees them as co-title sponsor until at least 2018, alongside Segafredo, an Italian coffee brand.

This Madone 9 Race Shop Limited is assigned to Mads Pedersen, a rider who joined the professional ranks at the youthful age of 18. Mads rode with the Cult Energy-Vital Water team for 2014 and 2015, a year with Stölting Service Group in 2016, and for 2017 and 2018, he finds himself with Trek-Segafredo. He is touted as a classics specialist – in 2013 he won the Paris-Roubaix Juniors edition. Click on through to see more of Mad Pedersen’s Trek Madone 9.

If Mads’ surname wasn’t a clue, the Danish flag on the Viper Red Madone should be. Beneath the flag and paint is Trek’s 700 series OCLV, which they claim is the lightest and strongest carbon available – “the ultimate combination of superior modulus and superior strength.”

Trek’s IsoSpeed decoupler system is touted as offering the best vertical compliance and aerodynamics.

Trek consider the Madone to be the ultimate fusion of power, aerodynamics, ride quality, and integration – “the first true superbike is a marvel of road bike engineering.”

It’s a known fact that aero road bikes are difficult to build; running all of those hidden cables can be a tricky affair. However, Trek’s Madone 9 is rumored to be the simplest to build of all the aero road bikes on the market today.

The Madone’s XXX Integrated bar and stem combination, featuring OCLV carbon is sleek.

Taped to the stem are Mads’ heart rate zones and corresponding power output.

SRM PC8 head unit – SRM supply the team with their power meter technology.

Trek relocated the Shimano Di2 Junction-A box. Typically slung beneath the stem, the Madone hides it beneath this neat hatch on the downtube.

SRM power metering device mounted to a Shimano Dura-Ace 9000 series crank. Like every other team running Shimano’s Di2 drivetrain, Trek is expected to take delivery of 9150 Di2 groupsets sometime during February 2017.

The Madone 9’s integrated chain catcher is reasonably hidden from view.

Bontrager’s DuoTrap speed and cadence sensor.

The soon-to-be-superceded Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 9070 rear derailleur.

Yet another Dura-Ace 11-28 cassette – this is pretty much the standard cassette ratio on pro bikes these days, at least at the 2017 Tour Down Under.

Shimano Dura-Ace 9000 series pedals for Mads Pedersen.

A not so common combination – Veloflex Roubaix tubulars in 700c x 25mm, mounted to Bontrager’s Aeolus 5, 50mm carbon tubular wheelset – aka the “Classics killer.”

DT Swiss internals are at the heart of the Aeolus 5 wheelset.

Madone’s KVF full carbon fork with tapered steerer, carbon dropouts, and the Madone aero integrated brakeset.

Trek’s Madone 9 is one of the few World Tour team bikes still touting an extended seatmast configuration.

The carbon seatmast cap is micro-adjustable with 25mm of available offset.

Bontrager Serano RXL saddle.

The team relies on the cheap but reliable Bontrager Bat Cage for holding its water bottles in place. Bontrager produce these cages from a durable composite material they believe keeps bottles firmly planted, ever over the roughest of terrains.

Trek Bikes


Article and photos by Gravel Cyclist. Jayson O’Mahoney is the Gravel Cyclist: A website about the Gravel Cycling Experience.

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21 Comments
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Julio
Julio
6 years ago

This trek has the back frame, the fork of the Bianchi Oltre and the front triangle of the Merckx EM525. . .

Dinger
Dinger
6 years ago
Reply to  Julio

You must no have seen any of these bikes in person.

edge
edge
6 years ago
Reply to  Julio

Dude…no on both counts.

Dave
Dave
6 years ago

Mother of all things holy I want this bike. I never thought I’d have Trek lust, but I can man up and admit it. This thing as been taunting me for the past few years.

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago
Reply to  Dave

Agreed! I never liked a Trek until this bike!…..Just not in Red 😛

CyclistA
CyclistA
6 years ago
Reply to  Dave

It truly is incredible. And definitely lives up the hype. Just wish they made the H1 geometry without the extra cost of the higher grade carbon. H2 didn’t work out for me and sold mine. Total bummer.

fealakwen
6 years ago

Someone knows the bar tape please?

Nunya Bidness
Nunya Bidness
6 years ago
Reply to  fealakwen

Bar tape looks like Bontrager Gel Cork.

Flatbiller
Flatbiller
6 years ago

Anyone know when Shimano will updated its 20th-century aesthetic? Those cranks look so 1999.

Spahr
Spahr
6 years ago
Reply to  Flatbiller

It’s only barely more modern with a 2003 aesthetic since the Shimano arm for SRM has remained relatively unchanged since DA7800. Really the only updates have been some graphic matching to 7900 then later 9000. However, don’t expect to see any future changes since Shimano is no longer going to manufacture arms for SRM power meters.

CyclistA
CyclistA
6 years ago
Reply to  Flatbiller

Those are the old cranks. The new Dura Ace 9100 cranks are out, but the di2 has been delayed, so teams are on the previous model 9000. Plus that is the Srm version which is different from the Shimano 9000 one.

Neofytos Sakellaridis Mangouras
Neofytos Sakellaridis Mangouras
6 years ago

Same bike today, while training in Denmark 🙂 https://www.instagram.com/p/BQS_tysAIsV/

haromania
haromania
6 years ago

One of the best looking road bikes on the market. Bravo Trek.

Bob Bike
Bob Bike
6 years ago

PURE BIKE PORN!!!!!!

RustyChain
RustyChain
6 years ago

how to make a simple road bike more complicated? Add flex-point and decoupler to the seattube.
how to make a simple road bike even more complicated? Add a slip joint to the steerer.

really? I get it if you ride for a living, but whens the last time your carbon wonderframe beat you up over your 3-4 hour ride? Its not like its 90s gen aluminum.

I roll an Emonda SLR9 and its smooth as silk with none of the extra junk. As soon as Trek tries to include isospeed to the Emonda, ill be searching for another brand.

At some point, more is not more.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago
Reply to  RustyChain

More choice is always more. Lucky for you, you can buy a large number of uncomplicated bikes while those that choose otherwise also have choice.

FWIW – The rear decoupling is actually an extremely simple design. I not 100% sold on the front…the design as new it very elegant, I just worry about the fits long term on something attached to my steering (not a safety issue, just a sloppiness issue). Time will tell and as with most things, the devil is in the execution details, materials and QA/QC.

Dingo
Dingo
6 years ago
Reply to  RustyChain

The Madone does not have a slip joint on the steerer.

Michael Minard
6 years ago
Reply to  RustyChain

You haven’t ridden one have you? I’ve done 200+ mile rides on this frame and I’m not fatigued like I am on the Madone 7 and other “stiff” frames. The Emonda frame is a climbing bike that’s super light weight. If that’s what you love then great but I don’t see a need to criticize this frame…it’s simply amazing!

Dingo
Dingo
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael Minard

I own one as well. This bike is mind blowing. So fast, so comfortable.

ZKWG
ZKWG
6 years ago

I have this bike and absolutely love it. H1 and vapor coat in a 52 and have never felt so connected to the road but in such a smooth way. The only depressing thing is the overhead shot of his handlebars and the apparent watts he’s targeting during his workout. Yikes!

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