TDU 2017 Tech: Robert Gesink’s Lotto Jumbo Bianchi Oltre X4

Lotto NL-Jumbo is the second team in the World Tour whose name sponsor is a lottery, the other being Lotto Soudal. The team is sponsored by the Dutch Lottery, along with co-sponsor Jumbo, a supermarket chain. Bianchi bicycles was founded in Italy in 1885, and the brand’s Celeste paint color is recognized worldwide. For 2017, the team’s go to bike is the Oltre XR4, the replacement for last year’s XR2. This example of the XR4 is piloted by Robert Gesink aka “The Condor of Varsseveld”.  Robert’s palmarès is stacked with top results, including Grand Tour stage wins, and overall wins at events like the 2012 Tour of California.

Click on through for more of Robert Gesink’s Bianchi Oltre XR4…

Bianchi have made many aerodynamic improvements to the Oltre XR4; the frame is more aggressively profiled than its predecessor.

The wedge-style seatpost clamp securely holds the aerodynamic carbon seatpost in place, and helps keep this area of the bike smooth and clean.

Tube shapes are a little deeper around the fork and downtube of the XR4 versus its predecessor.

The above photo doesn’t show the hourglass headtube so well, but the streamlined shape of the headtube is designed to help cut the air a little cleaner. Brake and electronic Di2 derailleur cables are routed into the frame through the headtube.

The Vision Metro 5D Aero handlebar was fitted to most of the team’s bikes at the Tour Down Under. Shimano remain as component supplier for 2017, with the company’s Dura-Ace Di2 electronic 9070 drivetrain serving duty on all of the team’s bikes. the latest generation Di2 9150 groupsets are trickling out to World Tour teams during February 2017.

Vision claim the Metron 5D integrated handlebar is one of the stiffest and most aero integrated handlebar and stem systems available.

Brake cables and electronic Di2 cables are discreetly routed inside the Metro bar – the Di2 Junction A box is also hidden behind the integrated computer mount.

The 5D is available to consumers in four sizes with a compact 125mm drop, and a claimed weight of 395 grams for the smallest size.

Along with improved aerodynamics, the Oltre XR4 includes Bianchi’s vibration-cancelling Countervail technology for a more comfortable ride over long distances.

Pioneer supply the team’s power measuring technology.

Pioneer’s left side measurement device resides discreetly on the backside of the non-drive crank.

Robert Gesink prefers 175mm cranks.

Dura-Ace 9000 series pedals.

The Shimano Di2 9070 11-speed rear derailleur is soon to be retired to the archives.

Dura-Ace 9000 series direct-mount brakes are standard fare on the Oltre XR4.

Shimano’s direct-mount brakes offer plenty of stopping power and improve aerodynamics a smidge.

Along with FSA (Full Speed Ahead), Brand Loyalty returns as a minor sponsor for 2017. They are a large marketing firm with several marketing agencies under its umbrella.

Vittoria remains as a tire supplier for 2017 with the Corsa in 700c x 25mm, which is the adopted standard size among World Tour teams.

There are plenty of adjustment options on Bianchi’s aerodynamic, carbon seatpost.

Robert chooses the San Marco Aspide Carbon FX saddle.

Bianchi Bicycles


Article and photos by Gravel Cyclist. Jayson O’Mahoney is the Gravel Cyclist: A website about the Gravel Cycling Experience.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

13 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
haromania
haromania
5 years ago

Damn fine looking bike.

Rich W.
Rich W.
5 years ago

Every non-disc road bike should have direct mount brakes.

LowRider
LowRider
5 years ago
Reply to  Rich W.

Braking news: all bike manufacturers destroyed bike frame molds after Rich W. order to refactor brake mounting points — SRAM goes out of business.

Juris
Juris
5 years ago
Reply to  Rich W.

why not integrated into fork/seatstays/chainstays like in Canyon Aero Speedster CF

OlyOop
OlyOop
5 years ago

Looking at that drop (from saddle to bar) makes me feel so old and fat 🙁

Stendhal
Stendhal
5 years ago

Isn’t FDJ also a national lottery-sponsored team?

heado
heado
5 years ago
Reply to  Stendhal

Yes it is

heado
heado
5 years ago

Is kind of sad to see this bioutifoul italian machine combined with crappy asian stuff !

males italian bike great again ! (with campy parts)

ebbe
ebbe
5 years ago
Reply to  heado

Shimano’s European headquarters and their biggest importer for Europe are based in Holland. The change you’ll see a Dutch WT team on anything other than Shimano is very slim. But you never know, Roompot (also Dutch, but pro-continental) switched from SRAM to Campagnolo for this season

Dave
Dave
5 years ago

Beautiful bike, but their geometry for fit has me scratching my head.

Comparing the 61 to the 55… The 61 has 54mm more stack but only 9mm more reach.

Comparing the 61 to the 59… The 61 has 1more stack and 1mm more reach.

Given the other specs it seems like each size will handle quite differently from one another.

Sure is pretty to look at.

Dave
Dave
5 years ago
Reply to  Dave

Ask! That should read that the 61 has 19mm more stack and 1mm more reach than the 59.

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
5 years ago
Reply to  Dave

That is pretty bad, but not all that uncommon unfortunately. Cannondale has had some similar weirdness on the SuperSix and Evos on the biggest sizes. There are some charts available online that plot out stack/reach increases up the size range and it is far from a linear increase. some even having a hook in them. I think it is due to the continued use of legacy geometries from before stack/reach were commonly used, when people were using top tube and head tube lengths to size bikes, and it reveals the shortcomings of those being key geometry drivers.

Dave
Dave
5 years ago
Reply to  TheKaiser

Yeah, lots of companies have wonky stuff going on. Cannonade used to drive me crazy but they have their large sizes sorted now.

But some of these old school companies still haven’t really embraced the notion of stack and reach. They include the measurements on their geo pages but they don’t design around them. They use the same approach they’ve been using for decades. Granted, the things they care about impact handling, but they don’t necessarily correlate to fit.