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The End of the Presta Valve? New Schwalbe CLIK Valve Has Potential to Become Industry Standard

Schwalbe CLIK VALVE prestaSchwalbe CLIK VALVE SCV
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Anyone who’s ever worked in a bike shop can agree that teaching new riders how to use a Presta valve is not always easy. Between the actual operation of the valve and the pump, there’s the potential for damaging the valve by bending or breaking the valve core. As an industry, we’ve put up with the Presta valve at first because narrow rims required it. Lately though, there’s been a concerted effort to improve airflow from the same size valve, or even switching to Schrader valves completely.

For John Quintana, the inventor of the CLIK Valve, there had to be an easier way. But more importantly, it needed to be an easier way that was also largely backward compatible in order for the industry to adopt it. Now that Schwalbe is backing the design, it seems like that is a strong possibility.

What is the CLIK Valve?

Push on with a click, pull off. The CLIK Valve is all about simplicity and ease of use. It also happens to have 50% better airflow than a presta valve. While there are no external moving parts on the CLIK Valve, there is a spring-loaded valve on the inside with an internal o-ring to seal it off. We have not had a chance to test the Schwalbe CLIK Valve yet, but if it works as promised, the design has a lot of promise.

Importantly, the CLIK Valve can be installed into all current Presta valves by simply changing the valve core. The design can also be integrated into inexpensive inner tubes to make it a true industry solution. Both Presta and Dunlop valves can be converted by simply swapping the valve core. There is also an adapter for Schrader valves that screws onto the top of the existing valve – this allows you to use a CLIK Valve pump with Schrader valves, while still being able to use a standard Schrader valve pump or chuck as well.

Pumps and CO2 inflators are also covered with adapters that can be screwed into the head or clamped down. Additionally, most existing presta valve pumps should work with the CLIK Valve without any adapter at all.

To use the CLIK Valve, simply press the pump head onto the valve until it clicks. Pump away, and then pull the pump head off when you’re done. This is all done without the ability to lose air, and Schwalbe claims pump wear is a thing of the past. Without grommets that squeeze down onto the valve, there’s no longer anything to wear out. The function of the valve supposedly makes it easier for bikes that are tricky to inflate like kid’s bikes – which was one of the motivating factors for John’s initial design. The inventor claims he wanted to design a system that was easy enough that his kids could inflate their own bike tires.

The Future of the CLIK Valve

As the first company to offer the CLIK Valve, Schwalbe has already been nominated for a Eurobike award. Initially, we’ll see the CLIK Valve available as tubeless valves and adapters for existing Presta, Schrader and Dunlop valves, but Schwalbe states that they will begin making their first tubes with the Schwalbe CLIK Valve soon. Additionally, SKS will already be offering a CLIK Valve-specific pump at Eurobike.

From the sounds of things, this likely won’t be the last company we see offering the CLIK Valve, and for good reason – it’s easier to use, offers increased airflow, and is mostly backward compatible.

schwalbe.com

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78 Comments
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Ashok Captain
Ashok Captain
11 days ago

Sounds promising. Hopefully the ‘O’ ring has been tested in hot climates.
Q1. How much heavier is it than a Presta core?
Q2. Can it take high pressures? (120psi). Some of us like to shake, rattle (teeth) and roll.
Cheers.

Robert
Robert
10 days ago
Reply to  Ashok Captain

Not that well .

Kyle
Kyle
7 days ago
Reply to  Ashok Captain

They need to resurface your velodrome.

tertius_decimus
tertius_decimus
11 days ago

Now, that is the solution to the problem. Good. The question is: how high of a pressure can it take? I regularly pump up 8.3 Bar. Presta valve can easily hold up to 15 Bar of pressure (for those, who still likes their tubulars).

blaeroSoot
blaeroSoot
11 days ago

First comment is “how much does this thing weigh?” when it’s the size of a valve core. Retrogrouch mentality that keeps us stuck with old tech. smh

MerlintheBikeWizard
MerlintheBikeWizard
11 days ago
Reply to  blaeroSoot

Not retrogrouches. Weight Weenies.

veloaficionado
veloaficionado
8 days ago

or “eejits”, to quote Father Ted.

Sevo
Sevo
5 days ago
Reply to  veloaficionado

Points for the Father Ted reference. Best comment of the decade

Somewhat Sceptical
Somewhat Sceptical
11 days ago

Remove valve core. Inflate and seat bead. Replace valve core. The air flow when blast thru stem bore is 3x faster than any of these overly complexicated widgets. Article refers to Dunlop valves – Euro weirdo things.

veloaficionado
veloaficionado
8 days ago

You;re ignoring the fragilities that Presta valve cores have, and the narrow necks that 6mm OD stems have, which these are likely to get rid of.

Kim lawniczak
Kim lawniczak
11 days ago

A solution to a non existent problem. I guess they have to sell you something

E V
E V
9 days ago
Reply to  Kim lawniczak

They can take my money. Presta valves are the work if the devil.

veloaficionado
veloaficionado
8 days ago
Reply to  Kim lawniczak

try working in a proper bike workshop for a day or two, and you’ll be eating your words with garnish and a side order of fries, tout de suite.

Elvis Moab
Elvis Moab
5 days ago
Reply to  veloaficionado

30 years of working in bike shops. Presta valves aren’t a problem.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 days ago
Reply to  Elvis Moab

They’re definitely not a problem but that doesn’t mean they can’t be improved. Downtube shifters weren’t a problem but I sure am happy we’ve moved on from them.

Tom
Tom
11 days ago

price it realistically and they’ll have a chance to become the new standard.

Eggs Benedict
Eggs Benedict
11 days ago
Reply to  Tom

Just what we need, another new standard. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with Presta valves.

Tom
Tom
11 days ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

I’ve used presta valves for 40 years, and I haven’t complained. But if a valve offered better chuck retention (ALL presta pump heads eventually leak) and less gumming from sealant, I’d consider upgrading.

Kyle
Kyle
7 days ago
Reply to  Tom

This was my first thought. I highly doubt I’m gonna get priced out of high end valves, but what I’d pay for is a valve that’s resistant to the most aggressive sealants.

Eggs Benedict
Eggs Benedict
11 days ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

Even better. Let’s come up with new standards for the 5 most mundane components on a bike, caliper bolts, tire valve, stem pinch bolts, etc. And make sure they are different than what currently exists, and that the only way to take advantage of these new standards is to completely replace your entire bike. That would be awesome.

Tom
Tom
11 days ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

not sure you got one of the main points of this – it retrofits into a standard presta housing. So you get “benefits” without changing the entire ecosystem, or incurring $100+ costs. I mean, you are free to change out your crank, stem, whatever, if you think the benefits outweigh the costs. That’s what most of us do. If this core costs $10-15 and it works as advertised, I’ll consider retrofitting every bike I own that is tubeless. If, on the other hand it costs $55/bike, it’s not worth $330 for me to refit everything.

RiceAWay
RiceAWay
11 days ago
Reply to  Tom

I have had continuous problems with pumps and washers to make them hold on to Presta Valves. I would change in an instant to avoid that.

froze
froze
9 days ago
Reply to  RiceAWay

I’ve been using Presta for over 50 years, and during those years used a lot of different pumps, never had a problem with any pump holding onto a Presta valve.

Some mini pumps do not have a screw-on hose attachment, so you have to press and hold the pump head onto the valve as you pump, it is more difficult to do than screwing on a hose and pumping, but once you have the technique it’s not a big deal. You place your thumb over the back of the pump head, and your index and middle finger wrap around the tire, then press and hold while you pump.

The biggest problem I’ve ever had was numerous mini pumps I tried and sent back failed to reach 60 psi! Some people are ok with that because they just go home, I don’t do that, I want to be able to pump up my tire and continue my ride on proper pressure in my tire, and besides a lot of times, I’m 30 or so miles from home, turning around is the same thing, why ride on 60 psi just because you don’t want to larger and thus heavier pump that might weigh an ounce more! That’s being to much of a weight weenie there, either that or these people don’t ride more than 5 miles from home!

Just because a mini pump advertises it can reach 160 PSI, none will, no matter the price or brand! But who runs 160 psi on a road bike for street use? The best and easiest to use mini pump for a road bike is the Lezyne Road Drive, the large one works the best but it is long at 11 inches, but nothing beats it for ease of use, I use it on my touring bike; the next best one is the the same pump but in a medium length which I use on my main road bike, it will take quite a bit of effort to get to 90 or so vs the large one, but it will get there. They also make a small version, but I seriously doubt it can get to 90 psi, but I’m 73 years old and my arms are not as strong as they used to be so maybe it’s just me.

The Lezyne Road Drive of all the mini pumps on the market is the best one for fewer strokes and ease of getting those strokes up to pressure.

veloaficionado
veloaficionado
8 days ago
Reply to  froze

I’ve been pumping up Presta-valved tyres for 40ish years (30 of those in commercial/voluntary bike workshops) , and I’ll observe that you seem to have lived a charmed life. If you use the same pump/head frequently on many different valves, the differing qualities (roughness, bad end chamfer) of the external valve cap threads lead to wear on the sealing washer in the pump chuck. This means that you get a leaky connection more often than not, and when it gets too bad, have to attempt to find replacement washers. Even Park Tool’s INF-x inflator heads have washers that are available intermittently, or expensively, where I live (Australia). It’s nowhere near a perfect system, and is well past due for an upgrade.

RiceAWay
RiceAWay
11 days ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

Let me guess – you ride a touring bike

RiceAWay
RiceAWay
11 days ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

Actually there’s EVERYTHING wrong with presta valves. I have to buy new washers for my pumps several times a year. Even the latest Silca pump head starts wearing immediately and starts to blow off at 50 psi. None of the heads for Pesta pumps is worth the time it takes to replace the washers. I have an entire bag of Presta valve heads and have to replace them fairly often. I haven’t had a head break off and fall into the tube but a friend did and half way to the ride it punctured the tube. This Click Valve works with everything you have now so what’s the problem?

P M
P M
10 days ago
Reply to  RiceAWay

That’s hard to do…

Bruce Lulu
Bruce Lulu
9 days ago
Reply to  RiceAWay

Try the Silca head. Works like a charm. Lasts a VERY long time. https://silca.cc/collections/inflation/products/hiro-locking-presta-chuck

Ullulu
Ullulu
7 days ago
Reply to  RiceAWay

There are pumps which screw onto the valve head. Haven’t had issues in years.
No matter how good that CLIK thing turns out to be, their own patent will make sure it can’t become industry standard any time soon.

Elvis Moab
Elvis Moab
5 days ago
Reply to  RiceAWay

Sounds like you’re doing it wrong.

WhateverBikes
9 days ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

Tell you don’t work at a bike shop without telling you don’t work at a bike shop.

veloaficionado
veloaficionado
8 days ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

Oh really? How many times have you seen snapped off stems, slow inflation, narrow valve stem necks?

veloaficionado
veloaficionado
8 days ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

Oh really? How many times have you seen snapped off stems, slow inflation, narrow valve stem necks? & noticed how badly the top few valve cap threads of a Presta valve wears any pump chuck washer, leading to a leaky seal and the need for frequent replacement, if you use it more than once or twice a day (like a bike shop/team mechanic does)?

Augsburg
Augsburg
11 days ago

Never have a problem with Presta, but Schrader is a hassle on a bike. Hard to hold the wheel tightly in place while you also press down hard with the Schrader tip on the filler to hold a seal and then operate the fill valve.

RiceAWay
RiceAWay
11 days ago
Reply to  Augsburg

Huh? The entire idea of a Schrader valve is the you press NOTHING on. You clip the pump head on and pump away.

Dann
Dann
10 days ago
Reply to  RiceAWay

I think Augsburg is referring to the valve getting pushed into the tire when you’re trying to shove the pump head on.
The solution (to this and any valve problem, really) already exists: Schrader valves with external threads

Allan
Allan
11 days ago

Has it been tested with sealant? How easy is it to clean?

Robin
Robin
11 days ago
Reply to  Allan

^This.

pluzsll
pluzsll
9 days ago
Reply to  Allan

pretty sure a tyre company looked into the sealant aspect of this

Deputy Dawg
Deputy Dawg
11 days ago

This article needs a video!

Daniel
Daniel
11 days ago
Reply to  Deputy Dawg

Look on pinkbike

TypeVertigo
10 days ago
Reply to  Deputy Dawg

BikeRumor’s IG account has one.

Bumscag
Bumscag
11 days ago

“…that was also largely backward compatible…”

Would’ve been more helpful to, you know, also share where it’s *not*.

Randy T
Randy T
11 days ago

Can I inject tubeless sealant through it? If not then it isn’t the solution I’m looking for.

Mike Riemer
Mike Riemer
11 days ago
Reply to  Randy T

Regardless of Presta, Schrader, or Clik valve, you should be removing the core, adding sealant, reinstalling core and then inflating. IMO.

RiceAWay
RiceAWay
11 days ago
Reply to  Mike Riemer

Tubeless tires are such a pain in the butt to force onto the rim that I returned to tube clinchers. I can change a tube in a couple of minutes but repairing a tubeless with a hole in it is a royal pain.

Daz
Daz
10 days ago
Reply to  RiceAWay

The pain of tubeless is TOTALLY dependent on your rim/tire COMBO. I have almost cried trying to fit several brands to my rim and also blown a tyre bead apart with too much pressure to seat! THEN I found a Pirelli Velo which matched my Giant SLR1’s. It seated with <100psi and minimal leaking, (nil initial sealant). I did have a trick to help the bead move outwards which is a thin smear of Sorbolene cream just to 'sheen' the rubber surface but this may not be a necessity.
Back to repairing a cut, which is not sealed by the liquid, had you tried plugs and adding more pressure before rolling again? The pressure-up helps by reducing wall flex and think of it like permitting platelets to make its scab before pulling your skin. Regardless of this working or not, as I said, the right COMBO will fit easily and seat well with a roadside type pressure.
I guess I'm converted and having had one tyre wear thin before ever getting a fully deflating flat and needing to do a tube repair. That just needed more pressure and more minutes to reseal.
The good experience only needed a fluid replacement at about half life.
On a different tyre, I did have a ~5mm cut which did not seal, but this was before I carried plugs, so that needed a roadside tube with internal folded banknote to get me home.

Marc Smith
Marc Smith
11 days ago
Reply to  Randy T

if you can just replace a core then I would guess you can…

Robin
Robin
11 days ago

So, press the pump on until it “clicks”. Is that an audible click, a tactile click, or both? If audible, how loud will it be? Seems like relying on a “click” might be problematic in some environments. More info is needed.

RiceAWay
RiceAWay
10 days ago
Reply to  Robin

I’m only reading the article but I think that you’re correct. I’ve ridden several centuries that paralleled freeways for awhile. You couldn’t hear a gunshot let alone a click. But I think that you can feel the pumphead slide into the depression.

Paul Barzizza
Paul Barzizza
11 days ago

I’m all for it. Questions as I think about it…How will they work with sealant? Will the internal o-rings be resilient in low temps ( Fat biking in the winter)…remains to be seen, I’m hopeful.

Wood_stix
Wood_stix
11 days ago

Dunlop shines. Robust core, easy inflation

mud
mud
11 days ago

I switched to Fillmore valves when they came out, and this looks like a better solution for tubeless set-ups. To seat stubborn tires, you need the biggest airway possible, and you can’t beat a Presta, with valve core removed, for that. And with this, you don’t even need the little tool like what Stan’s makes.

Robin
Robin
10 days ago
Reply to  mud

I don’t see these as a reason for me to switch from Fillmore valves. I like mine. It’s easy to seat tires with ’em. I can put sealant through ’em without the clogging. Even if they did clog, they’re easy to pull out and clean.

Still, new solutions are always worth looking at.

Malc_B
Malc_B
11 days ago

Does it cope with the pressures needed for rear shocks on MTB?

blancot
blancot
10 days ago
Reply to  Malc_B

Seems doubtful given the pressures.

mud
mud
11 days ago

For all those commenters saying “Presta is fine,” tubeless sealant has shown the pitfall of the Presta valve. The is compatible with Presta valves, just replace the core. Why the bitching?

Malc_B
Malc_B
10 days ago
Reply to  mud

Because cyclists have been bitten so many times by manufacturers improvements, introduction to milk is some more .

I sounds ok but have to see how it will deal with sealant much better than presta, same valve body. Main advantage seems to be an easier to use pump connection ‍♂️.

David
11 days ago

I will call it the “Schresta”

GREGORY NICHOLS
GREGORY NICHOLS
10 days ago

Let’s stop with creating new standards. It’s like we’re trying to follow the tech world with designed obsolescence to try to keep things new and relevant which only ends up making the customer have to buy new c*** all the time.

WhateverBikes
8 days ago

I ride and rebuild nineties mountain bikes. I will not use electronic shifters, and carbon frames and disc brakes are not my thing either.
Just so you know I am not one to eagerly buy all the latest stuff just because it is new or because of some marketing spin.
Sometimes though, something new is just better, or in this case, looks promising.

We shouldn’t buy stuff simply because it is new and innovating, but we shouldn’t shun stuff just because it is new and innovative either.

Robert
Robert
10 days ago

Spring deformation will make this concept a fly – by – nighter , in my opinion .

Daz
Daz
10 days ago
Reply to  Robert

The spring in the new valve? Isn’t that irrelevant with 40 to 90psi doing the actual job of sealing? I’d like to see a cutaway version to confirm my theory and ‘deflate’ yours

TypeVertigo
10 days ago

I actually like this design. One thing I despise about Presta valves is that with some pumps with screw-on valve chucks (Lezyne I’m looking at you), loosening the chuck after you’re done inflating the tire carries the risk of the valve core itself removing from the valve body. This theoretically does away with all of that because there’s nothing to screw on.

It’ll be interesting to see how this gets accepted over the long term, but the barrier to entry is pretty low considering the CLIK valve core can just replace any Presta one. Should be more economical than, say, the Fillmore valve route.

Ullulu
Ullulu
7 days ago
Reply to  TypeVertigo

It won’t get accepted at all due to their own stupidity. They’ve got a patent covering Europe.

Beholderseye
10 days ago

How do you add or take out sealant?!?

Nicolas D
Nicolas D
10 days ago

How much will the new pump from SKS cost and how likely are other pump manufacturers to adopt CLICK valve for their pumps and pump heads ? A single pump from SKS does not sound like “new standard” to me.

bcblues
bcblues
10 days ago

And how long before it plugs up with sealant?

Owen
Owen
9 days ago

What’s wrong with Schrader?

veloaficionado
veloaficionado
8 days ago
Reply to  Owen

8mm hole in a deep-section/lightweight road rim?

DaveJ
DaveJ
9 days ago

The Reserve valves are already a huge improvement over presta valves, and they work with all existing pumps.

PoorInRichfield
PoorInRichfield
8 days ago

A direct link to the product page:
https://www.schwalbe.com/en/clik-valve/

I will gladly upgrade to the CLIK valve if it truly lives-up to it’s promises. I won’t miss having to unscrew and screw the Presta valve lock thingy or worry about bent valves anymore.

veloaficionado
veloaficionado
8 days ago

After any medium amount of use, the chuck washer in any pump chuck is worn away by the last few threads of a Presta valve stem, leading to leaky fitment, and when you’re sick of it, a faff sourcing and replacing the washer in the chuck (even for a Park Tool INF1 or 2, this is an item that you may or may not be able to get hold of); repeat cycle. If this system solves that problem, I’m all for it.

veloaficionado
veloaficionado
8 days ago
Reply to  veloaficionado

Oh, & I forgot gummed up valves from sealant.

Mark
Mark
8 days ago

Just got back from Eurobike, so I can share some feedback on this.
When clicking the pump on/off it is super easy (almost too easy), but you can feel that it is on.
I tried to bend it, put on the pump head under an angle, slam it down etc. to demge it or make it loose air, but it worked every time.
The valves/pump heads will probably get on/off tousends times a day during the show, and everything was still working…
It will get cloged up with tubeless sealent eventualy (it should take more time than normal valve core), than you have to replace it…
It is great that it is compatible with any valve you have on your bike and the design is good, but the biggist problem is if pump manufactures will adopt this sollution and we will see more handpumps, CO2 pupms etc at the stores…

Brian
Brian
8 days ago

I love the idea. While I do not have issues with the normal presta valve, if it will help with gumming up from tubeless or help with the bending of the presta head, that is fantastic. I don’t normally bend the stem, but, it does happen every so often.

Kyle
Kyle
7 days ago

Why do I feel like this should have been Silca?

M.m.
M.m.
4 days ago

I have a couple of extra thickness good year inner tubes that have Schrader valves. These inner tubes hold air within the tires for a pretty long time. When placing any air pump head onto any valve (stem), make sure every thing is aligned and that the valve stem is not at an angle in relation to the bike rim.best to wear safety goggles or glasses or face shield when inflating bike tires.

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