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The new ENVE SES Disc wheel is tubeless compatible, light, and for rim or disc brakes

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When you’re looking for the fastest rear wheel, you reach for a disc – if you’re averaging faster than 27mph. ENVE still feels that if your average speed is under that 27mph/43kph average, you’d be better suited by the SES 7.8 rear wheel. But for those cranking the big watts, a disc wheel can indeed be a faster set up.

The new ENVE SES Disc wheel is tubeless compatible, light, and for rim or disc brakes

Which is why, after two years in development, the Smart ENVE System is expanding with the addition of a disc wheel. Available in rim brake or disc brake configurations, the SES Disc features a one-piece molded construction that only uses

bonding at the hub. The rest of the wheel is one-piece and molded to a machined PMI core which gets layered between Spread Tow Carbon Fibers. The result is an incredibly strong wheel that is also quite light at 1225g.

The new ENVE SES Disc wheel is tubeless compatible, light, and for rim or disc brakes

The wheel is also tubeless compatible which apparently was not easy to accomplish. According to ENVE’s engineer Clint Child, “tubeless compatibility proved to be a challenging proposition in the development of the SES Disc, but given the performance advantages inherent to tubeless, it was a performance requirement for this project. The bead stiffness of a quality tubeless compatible road tire applies enough pressure to the rim that it relieves laminate tension and the wheel moves out of dish. We solved this problem through a combination of laminate design and tooling offset so that when a tubeless tire is installed and inflated, the wheel moves into dish.”

Whether running tubeless or standard clincher, the wheel is optimized for 25mm tires. Rim brake versions will include ENVE’s full carbon molded brake surface texture for improved braking in wet or dry conditions. The disc brake versions will use a Centerlock disc hub which is fully made from aluminum with a 40t ratchet freehub. The rim brake hub uses the same freehub, but with an aluminum driveside hub shell and carbon non-drive hub shell.

The new ENVE SES Disc wheel is tubeless compatible, light, and for rim or disc brakes

Both wheels are covered by ENVE’s five-year warranty and will sell for $2700 each. Rim brake versions will ship by the end of October while the disc brake options will ship a the end of November.

 

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Tim Ryan
Tim Ryan
5 years ago

Will there be a track version?

OriginalMV
OriginalMV
5 years ago
Reply to  Tim Ryan

A track version of a full carbon tubeless clincher disc wheel? I’m not sure the projected sales number for that additional sku# are compelling.

MaraudingWalrus
MaraudingWalrus
5 years ago
Reply to  OriginalMV

I need a track version of the tubeless clincher disc disc brake wheel.

blahblahblah
blahblahblah
5 years ago

you guys!

BikerJay
BikerJay
5 years ago
Reply to  Tim Ryan

+1 for track version (tubular)

FFM
FFM
5 years ago

Three things:
1. It’s amazing that the influence the tire bead has on dish is accounted for. I don’t know if this is common across all carbon wheels but it’s amazing.
2. Good on ENVE for putting a clear line between who will benefit from this product and who won’t.
3. This thing is going to look rad at full speed with white decals.

bob
bob
5 years ago

when you inflate a tire would not both sides of the tire push out equally. therefore canceling each other out. if one side of a tire pushes more than the other and they are using this to dish the wheel, what happens if you put a tire on backwards. are you then un-dishing the wheel even further?

This sounds like the Enve engineers have been talking to the trek engineers about how to spin garbage that sounds good.

FFM
FFM
5 years ago
Reply to  bob

“What happens if you put a tire on backwards?” Man, I don’t know if you should really be throwing stones after that comment…
Both sides of the tire should exert the same force. Because one side of the wheel has to accommodate a cassette and is therefore quite a bit flatter compared to the other side, the two sides are affected differently by the force exerted by the tire regardless of which way you put the tire on. Imagine putting your weight on a stick that’s held straight up versus one that’s off at an angle. Same you, same stick, but obviously two different scenarios and to keep yourself from falling over with the angled stick you’re going to have to compensate for that.

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