Home > Other Fun Stuff > Prototypes & Concepts

Think You Can Win a DH World Cup? Gates’ll Give You €100K If You Do It With a Belt-Drive!

Gamux Sego Gates belt drive Pinion gearbox DH bike, prototype(Photo/Gamux)
6 Comments
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

Gates – maker of cycling’s leading belt-drive system – is offering a 100,000€ prize to the first elite man or woman to win a single round of the UCI Mountain Bike Downhill World Cup on a bike with a Gates belt-drive. It’s only actually been UCI-legal since last season, and Gamux Factory Racing dropped in on a Gates Carbon belt-drive Pinion gearbox prototype bike last spring. So get out there and race the Gamux crew on a belt-drive bike and win a bunch of bonus cash!

Get 100,000€ Bonus for UCI DH win on Gates belt-drive bike!

Gamux Sego Gates belt drive Pinion gearbox DH bike, GAMUX Factory Racing 2024 Ft William DH World Cup, photo by Sebastian Sternemann
(Gamux Factory Racing/Photo by Sebastian Sternemann)

That’s right, all you need to do to get a 100,00€ bonus is win a DH World Cup on a Gates-equipped bike. Just rock up to the start line and lay down the fastest time against the best mountain bikers in the world, on a bike that’s not yet even made it onto the podium.

It may not have been done yet. But a belt-drive makes a lot of sense for racing DH.

Gamux Sego Gates belt drive Pinion gearbox DH bike, drivetrain detail
(Photo/Gamux)

No derailleur flapping around waiting to get bashed off by some passing rock. Maybe a gearbox in the middle of the bike for better weight distribution and more ability to tune suspension around its sprung weight. Gamux has known that for years, and you could already buy the chain-drive Sego since 2021. But now the Gates Carbon drive prototype that we spotted last season, is officially in their line-up – as the 2024 Sego!

Gamux Sego Gates belt drive Pinion gearbox DH bike, complete
(Photo/Gamux)

And your reward would be 26x what the last World Cup winner earned. Yep, the prize money for winning an elite UCI DH World Cup race is just 3750€ again this season. Sounds like a pretty good motivation

Gamux Sego Gates belt drive Pinion gearbox DH bike, GAMUX Factory Racing 2024 Ft William DH World Cup, photo by Sebastian Sternemann
(Gamux Factory Racing/Photo by Sebastian Sternemann)

You just better do it fast if you want to beat those Gamux Factory Racing kids. They’ve already got a good head start!

One nice bit of extra info, Gates isn’t in a giant hurry it seems. Their €100K bonus prize will roll over to next season, if no one wins it this year!

Gates to Award 100K Euros to the First World Cup Mountain Bike Downhill Win on a Gates Belt-Driven Bike

Read the full wording of their “contest” below:

DENVER, April 12, 2024 – Gates (NYSE: GTES), a global provider of innovative highly engineered power transmission and fluid power solutions – and pioneer in belt-driven micromobility – has raised the stakes for mountain bike racers around the world. Gates announced a massive €100,000 belted purse for the first elite racer to win a Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) Mountain Bike Downhill race on a Gates belt-driven bike.

This Gates Belted Purse Prize, which will roll over if not claimed this season, is intended to inspire teams and athletes to consider the unique performance advantages a belted downhill bike offers.

“With the advancements Gates has achieved through materials science and engineering innovation, the time has come to make history,” said Chris Sugai, General Manager, Gates Global Mobility. “Gates intends to show that the benefits of belt drives and advanced gearing solutions are applicable at the highest levels of mountain bike racing. And along with sport fans around the world, we’re eager for the 2024 UCI downhill races as the Gates Carbon Drive Prize adds to the excitement.”

Using a belt drive in conjunction with a gearbox on a mountain bike offers several key advantages. A rider has greater control, improved balance, and better handling due to lower unsprung mass in the rear wheel and concentration of mass in the center of the bike. Unsprung mass refers to the weight of components that are not supported by the suspension system, such as wheels, tires, and drivetrain. Reducing the unsprung mass of the rear wheel allows for more control and less rebound forces when riding. Navigating tight corners and technical sections are improvements enabled by this radically different drivetrain configuration.

Another benefit of a belt drive mountain bike is reduced risk of malfunctions versus a traditional chain system. Chains are prone to stretching, derailleurs are often damaged, and cassettes can clog with dirt and debris which can lead to poor performance and frequent mechanical issues. Gates Carbon Drive belts are made from highly durable materials that are resistant to stretching and corrosion, and importantly have no weak link.

Downhill racing has always been an adrenaline-fueled sport that pushes athletes and bicycle technology to their limits. Skill, courage, and determination are critical for success, and technical improvements to the bike can lead to race-winning seconds off the clock. With the Gates Carbon Drive €100K Prize, we’re about to see history in the making. It’s going to be a great season.

For more information including contest rules, visit: GatesCarbonDrive.com/products/100k-belted-purse

#GatesMTB100K #GatesBeltDrive

GatesCarbonDrive.com

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

6 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Jason DW
Jason DW
11 days ago

I would die within the first 200 feet of a WC downhill

blahblahblah
blahblahblah
10 days ago

might as well make it 1 million no one is going to win on one

tertius_decimus
tertius_decimus
9 days ago

If you like to gamble, I tell you I’m your man!

Dann
Dann
9 days ago

Does it have to function? Can Aaron Gwin just hang one where his chain would’ve been and coast downhill to a win?

Gregory Q Tillery
Gregory Q Tillery
8 days ago

I assume a belt drive on any bike would work – I bet there are some privateers eyeballing certain tracks (like Leogang, where Gwin won) that could be done with a single speed.

Brendan
Brendan
5 days ago

This is honestly brilliant.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.