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TMAC Stays Glued to the Pedals with Huge, Concave Signature Model from Deity

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Having your own signature product is a good indication that you’ve made it as a professional rider. But it also means that product that has your name on it has to live up to expectations. When Deity approached Tyler McCaul to build his signature pedal, the two along with other Deity team members like Cam Zink put a lot of thought into what would appear to be a simple platform pedal to many.

Wanting the biggest, most supportive pedal you could build, Deity’s TMAC pedal is ready to make slipped pedals a thing of the past…

Deity tmac pedal bladerunner blacklabel micro dm stem cavity 35  (5)

Deity tmac pedal bladerunner blacklabel micro dm stem cavity 35  (4) Deity tmac pedal bladerunner blacklabel micro dm stem cavity 35  (3)

Deity tmac pedal bladerunner blacklabel micro dm stem cavity 35  (2)

Earlier this year we got a sneak peek at the TMAC when one of the first samples was on display at Sea Otter. Holding the pedal in your hand, you get a sense of the massive 110×105 mm platform as well as the super deep concave shape which dips 2.5mm in the center. Riders wanting something flatter should check out Deity’s Bladerunner.

“We were initially worried about the effect a symmetrical pedal at a 90 degree right angle would have when the foot tried to stomp down and engage back on the platform.  Would the foot shift forward or backward more? Would there be a delay on the engagement?  To test this we made a weight driven machine that would apply downward force on the pedal when placed on a 90 degree plain.  We could then measure the time it took for the foot to land flat and securely on the pedal and also, where the foot ended up being in relation to the axle when it rotated horizontally. We could then move the foot location forward or backwards to then test stability when the foot is not in the ideal position. The results were as we thought they would be. The added surface area behind the spindle allowed the concave profile to really shine. The foot confidently had space to connect to the pedal without worry of lack of foot support or needing to be in the perfect location.” Eric Davies (Deity, Owner).

If you look at most platform pedals, they are shaped like a slanted parallelogram with the actual pedal platform shifted forwards from the axle. What Eric is referring to is the fact that the TMAC platform is centered on the axle with a symmetrical design. This is said to give better support when landing big jumps or tricks, especially when your feet aren’t quite on the pedals.

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Made from extruded and machined 6061 T6 aluminum, each pedal includes 14 pins per side. Typically, grub screws are frowned upon for traction pins since one rock strike can damage the allen screw, making them very difficult to remove. For the TMAC though, each screw is double sided and can be removed when damaged by removing the pin on the opposite side and using the preserved allen screw underneath. All pins are pre-applied with LocTite so they should stay put, but if they happen to eject the pedals include a full replacement set.

Other details include a heat treated chromoly spindle that runs on multiple micro sealed bearings and a DU bushing that are arranged to distribute pedal load to prevent blowout.

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Available in 5 anodized colors and white powder coat, TMAC pedals have a claimed weight of 409g, and will sell for $168.99. Available now.

deitycomponents.com

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gjj
gjj
8 years ago

Damn, my pedals have all been wrong, they’re either centered, or with the contact area forward of the axle, underside backwards…still centered.

That said they look lovely apart from the price, with big feet in appreciating the move to larger pedals recently, I tend to wear hiking boots on the bike too so pins alone dont cut it, and this obviously causes width issues, definitely on my want list, maybe when they reach discount though huh.

JDM
JDM
8 years ago

There is only one TMac. And that is Tracy Mcgrady.

J N H
J N H
8 years ago

Nice pedal, but that’s made in USA prices for made in Taiwan parts. UK made Superstar Nanos it is!

Groghunter
Groghunter
8 years ago

Ah, so THAT’S why they don’t have a beveled edge to slide over rocks. Makes sense, love lots of concave, but i catch pedals way too often for a big flat edge

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
8 years ago

“If you look at most platform pedals, they are shaped like a slanted parallelogram with the actual pedal platform shifted backwards from the axle.”

Wait…whaaa?

You do know that the left hand thread pedal goes on the left side, right? If so, the platform should be shifted forward.

“To test this we made a weight driven machine that would apply downward force on the pedal when placed on a 90 degree plain. We could then measure the time it took for the foot to land flat and securely on the pedal and also, where the foot ended up being in relation to the axle when it rotated horizontally. We could then move the foot location forward or backwards to then test stability when the foot is not in the ideal position. The results were as we thought they would be. The added surface area behind the spindle allowed the concave profile to really shine.”

I gotta see this testing equipment! Sounds super cool, but it is tough to imagine how it could work from this explanation.

Ol' Shel'
Ol' Shel'
8 years ago

JNH, You’re right. We were told that exporting jobs and importing goods would save consumers lots of money. Well, they slowly jacked up prices so that we’re paying US prices for cheap goods and exporting US wealth, non-stop.

Anybody who trusted business to pass the savings onto us is a fool.

And concave pedals are a bad idea.

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