2016-FSA-SL-K-carbon-crankarms-mountain-bike

FSA is updating their carbon SL-K and K-Force Light cranksets with an all-new BB392 spindle standard. Put simply, it’s a 92mm wide, 30mm diameter spindle that follows the logic of the BB386EVO standard they helped introduce for road bikes. Yes, it’s a new “standard”, but like the 386, it’ll work on any frame thanks to a variety of bottom brackets to go with it. Threaded BSA? No problem, the wider spindle makes room for an outboard bearing bottom bracket, which makes things even stiffer thanks to the wide bearing placement. Pressfit 30, PF92, etc., will all be accommodated, too, with this single new spindle size.

This eliminates the need for a steel spindle, which makes them lighter while still fitting any BB. The arms are a little more svelte than before, too, saving a few more grams and keeping Q-factor unchanged…and they get new, asymmetric and proprietary 4-bolt patterns.

But these aren’t the only ones getting a wider spindle. They’re joined by new Boost148 models and what is perhaps the first BB30 fat bike spindle. Check those and lots, lots more new stuff below…

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Their new MegaTooth Narrow/Wide chainrings finally get real. The narrow wide tooth pattern combines with the overly tall teeth to give it a dual chain retention mechanism.

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The mountain bike SL-K and K-Force Light use a new asymmetrical bolt pattern with a 76 BCD. They range from 26T up to 38T for MTB, and they’ll work with 9, 10 and 11 speed chains. For doubles, they have a new asymmetric 96/68 BCD that’ll work with 10 and 11 speed groups.

The upside to the new design? The K-Force Light crankset, which uses their hollow carbon arms, will now be a 425g crankset when set up with a single 32T chainring.

The alloy Afterburner and Comet cranksets will keep a 104BCD crankset option for another year alongside the new asymmetric bolt pattern. Eventually, though, all things MTB will transition to the asym versions.

Fortunately, both carbon cranksets will remain available in 110BCD for cyclocross in a 5-bolt pattern in classic tooth counts.

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Boost148 cranks will be available for the alloy Afterburner and Comet MegaExo 104BCD cranksets.

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The offset spider pushes the chainline out a bit to accommodate the wider hub spacing of Boost148.

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Like the new carbon cranks, the Boost148 cranks keep the same Q-factor.

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Ready for the third way things get wider? FSA’s new Fatbike cranks will gain a BB30 spindle option for the Afterburner and Comet to fit 100mm bottom bracket sizes.

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They also made a bottom bracket for it:

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Standard 24mm spindles will also be available (bottom). The bottom brackets are the same as regular ones, just with wider sleeves between them.

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The SL-K 20mm drop stems we saw at Eurobike are now in stock. They have a very wide faceplate, so they help stiffen up the bar, too.

Not shown, the new ITC seatposts are now available, which use their fancy new saddle clamps to get either 0/5mm or 20/-5mm offset in a design that lets you adjust fore/aft separately from tilt.

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The Gravity Light parts get rebadged as just Gravity and have fresh graphics. The bigger news, which wasn’t supposed to be news until mid April, was the addition of the new Gravity GRID lineup:

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At first, we were told there’d be a very limited preview at Crankworx Rotorua this week. And then there was this very public display of the entire new line in their Taipei Cycle Show booth, which came with the request that we don’t spill all the beans until the official launch at Sea Otter. Considering they weren’t really talking, that’s easy enough, but some features can be gleaned simply by seeing them.

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The Gravity GRID line is designed as a wallet friendly group for enduro/trail type riding. The cranks look to use a single spider for single and double applications, all using a standard 104BCD.

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Everything’s alloy, and the seatpost uses the same flip-flop cradle to give it 0mm or 15mm offset. They wanted to offer a complete cockpit group even though they’re the first to admit most users of this group are going to be running a dropper seatpost.

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The chainguides have a versatile design that makes them easy to adjust and easy to remove the crankarm for swapping chainrings.

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Pull the pin and the guide will slide up and down to adjust height, or flip up to clear the chainring altogether.

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The wheels were something they seemed pretty proud of, enough so to let slip a few details. As far as they know, these are the first asymmetric hookless alloy rims going into production. (UPDATE: As noted in the comments, they’re not the first hookless alloy rims, but Gravity folks clarified they’re the first with an asymmetric spoke placement, which allows for better triangulation and a stiffer wheel)

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There’s a healthy bead lock channel to keep the tire in place, and the hookless design supposedly give the tire a better profile and better feel. It’ll be available in 27.5″ and 29″ options with all the usual axle options.

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Retail should be around $600, and the weight is still being finalized and may drop from what’s shown here. Stay tuned for more on the new GRID group when we head to Sea Otter Classic in April.

2016 FSA ROAD COMPONENTS

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All carbon seatposts are now Di2 internal battery compatible. They used to make the SL-K and K-Force posts in two versions, standard and the battery ready models that had a glued-in alloy sleeve to hold the battery. The new ones use a rubbery plastic sleeve that cradles the battery and fits snugly into the bottom of the post. It’s lighter and simpler than before.

They’re also working on a Di2 compatible mountain bike bar that’ll have the wire grooves, but they’re not ready yet.

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New direct mount rim brakes are designed to fit the Shimano standard but use a center pull cable design. The rear has an inline cable adjust, the front has the bezel on the top of the caliper.

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It uses a power cam design to spread the arms at the top. Cable adjustments are made behind a rubber cover that’s attached with a small strand so it won’t get lost. Available this fall.

Not shown, the road wheels will get a few revisions, too.

Vision Team 30 wheels add two disc brake options, giving you a choice between 6-bolt and CenterLock hubs. It shares the same rim as the standard model, meaning there’s still a brake track. Weight is 2,100g, meant as a workhorse wheelset (think cross and gravel) that comes in under $500 for the pair. They’re also tubeless ready.

The TriMax 30 gets a dedicated disc specific rim and is more of performance wheelset for the road thanks to its 17mm inner width and 1,590g weight.

Those wheels, plus the Metron 40 Clincher Disc carbon fiber wheelsets, all add thru axle options.

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23 Comments
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Andy
Andy
7 years ago

“They say it’s the first 30mm spindle for fat bikes,”

Wait, so is the Race Face cinch system not a 30mm spindle?

This is what their site says:

“Industry standard 30mm spline interface CNC machined from 7050 alloy”

Seems like FSA is pulling ‘facts’ out of their ass as usual. Sorry guys, check with your competitors before making baseless claims about your product.

ah
ah
7 years ago

Lots to like here.

Smaller chainring size compatibility, wide BB compatibility etc, just need this on the lower end stuff too.

gringo
gringo
7 years ago

awesome! more boost cranks!

awesome! a Delta Brake remake!

what?

Ol' Shel'
Ol' Shel'
7 years ago

SO, Boost 148 tried (and fails) to improve chainline…

…and crank makers widen the chainline to make it just as horrible as with 142.

Good Lord.

Brian
Brian
7 years ago

I’ve been trying to keep a good attitude through the onslaught of new “standards” in 2015 but the second new bb standard from FSA is what finally has me thinking, “maybe I just need to stop reading this stuff.”

That said, if we can get boost 148 hubs, frames and cranks that don’t change q-factor and, more importantly, heel clearance, then I guess I can deal.

badbikemechanic
badbikemechanic
7 years ago

The brakes look like a modern interp of Campagnolo Deltas minus the beauty.

Colin M
Colin M
7 years ago

Lots of silly standards stuff but hidden in there is a smart seatpost and chainguide design.

SmooveP
SmooveP
7 years ago

I believe e13 cranks are 30mm as well.

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
7 years ago

@Ol SHel- At least now you can buy “non Boost” cranks, put them on your 148 bike, and get the chainline that you think is best. Don’t be fooled, it is the crank/drivetrain guys requiring this chainline that you feel is “horrible”. Boost was not done to improve chainline, it was done to improve wheel stiffness.

dirk
7 years ago

B.O.R. Germany was the first with a crankset and 30mm spindles.

He made a fatbike crank while RaceFace was sleeping for a few years.

Jay
Jay
7 years ago

Like Andy said above, a 30mm spindle on a “standard” bb shell is not new to MTBs. Race Face has had this for years.

Eric Hansen
Eric Hansen
7 years ago

“First 30mm spindle for fatbikes”

lolnope. e.13 has made fat aluminum 30s for a couple years now. They’ve also had 30mm aluminum spindles that everything from BSA to PF30 for an even longer period.

Eric Hansen
Eric Hansen
7 years ago

Ol’ Shel’

You are aware 142 has identical chainline and outside DO width as 135×10, right? The only difference is in the axle, not in the actual hub spacing.

Endurobob
Endurobob
7 years ago

I don’t understand, maybe someone could clarify. I, like most people, was pissed when boost 148 came out to the public, arguing that it was just another way to make older bikes obsolete and force people to buy new things. I was then educated on the facts, and ultimately thought that the fixing to the admittedly shitty chainlines on FS bikes could have some benefit. Now I’m seeing all these manufacturers release “boost 148 compatible” cranks which move the chainline outboard more, which negates any benefit from running a wider chainline in the first place? WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON

Andy
Andy
7 years ago

I thought a standard was supposed to be standard, but seems the only standard thing is the amount of standards.

mateo
mateo
7 years ago

@endurobob – As mentioned, Boost was not designed to “fix” chainline. It increases rear hub spacing in order to increase spoke triangulation for stiffer/stronger wheels. By doing this, the chainline moved 3mm outboard. This means you need cranks with the new chainline.

Why do you think current chainlines required fixing?

Jay N
Jay N
7 years ago

“As far as they know, these are the first hookless alloy rims going into production.” Specialized specced a alloy beadless rim on a bunch of bikes for 2015 and it has also been available to purchase for at least 6 months.
http://www.specialized.com/us/en/ftb/wheels/roval-mtb-all-mountain/roval-traverse-29

Eric Hansen
Eric Hansen
7 years ago

Seconded. What’s the matter with current chainlines?

Ol' Shel'
Ol' Shel'
7 years ago

I’m 100% aware that 135qr and 142 both have the same miserable chainline, and that’s why 142 is such a lame standard.

To get perfect chainline on a 51mm CL crank, you’d want 157×12 or 150 qr. Current set-ups have the rings too far inboard/cass too far outboard by about 6.5mm. It’s why your chain falls off the big cog when you pedal backward.

Boost 148 is wider, so it should have improved chainline, but they purposely stopped short of giving you perfect chainline AND an even-stronger wheel.

Good Lord, people like to criticize others. I’ve been looking at this for years. I’ve measured components with calipers. I’ve done the math…

p
p
7 years ago

when did a full blown media release equal a ‘leak’?

Also, HED have had a production alloy hookless rim for a while.

Julien M.
Julien M.
7 years ago

Are you sure about the Vision Team 30 disc wheelset’s weights? They’re listed at 1875g on Vision’s site.

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
7 years ago

@Shel- I think you stated your point backwards in your last comment above, no? I assume you prefer a chainline which lines up with the lower cogset gears, rather then “centered” as the drivetrain companies prefer? If so, just run a normal 135/142 based crankset on your 148 bike. You see these “boost” compatible cranks because the drivetrain guys (Sram, Shimano, FSA, etc.) will not sell components to big OE’s unless they comply with the drivetrain mfg. preferred chainline.

Paul
Paul
7 years ago

Dear bike industry,

“…Yes, it’s a new “standard”, but like the 386, it’ll work on any frame thanks to a variety of bottom brackets to go with it. Threaded BSA? No problem…”

This is how you bring new standards to the marketplace without alienating your customers. SRAM and Trek, please take careful note.