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TPE17: Clever commuter, mountain bike pedals from Xpedo & Wellgo

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The new Xpedo Ambix is a flip-flop clipless-or-flat mountain bike pedal that lets you snap into it on one side, or sty loose on the flats on the other. But not too loose, thanks to 10 replaceable pins threaded into the 6061 alloy body. They come in five colors, get micro-adjustable tension and sealed cartridge bearings.

These aren’t an entirely new concept…for that, there’s the commuter options from Wellgo…

Claimed weight for the Ambix is 400g, retail pricing for this and everything else here is TBD, some are early prototypes. 

The F315 Folding Pedal is a different take on the category, simply splitting open rather than pulling outward and folding down. When opened, it juts out just 4cm from the crank arm. A pin in the center locks it into the closed position for riding. Weight is 296g thanks to a nylon body with bushings inside.

The Quick is a removable pedal that builds in a simple theft deterrent for your entire bike. 


Simply remove the pedal from the frame with the tool-free quick release, then slide its body over a spike and press the lock closed. That will keep anyone from riding off on your bike while you duck into the store…and possibly even keep them from wiggling the wheel out of the frame. 

The Rhythm is a slip-on cadence meter that connects via Bluetooth Smart and/or ANT+. Just slide it over the pedal’s axle then install the pedals like normal.  

The design makes it easy to add cadence measurement to any bike and quickly move it between bicycles. It weighs just 25g, and you’ll get about 200 hours out of a standard CR2032 battery. 

Xpedo.com and WellgoPedal.com

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JasonK
JasonK
5 years ago

I don’t follow what Tyler wrote regarding the anti-theft pedal:

“Simply remove the pedal from the frame with the tool-free quick release, then slide its body over a spike and press the lock closed. That will keep anyone from riding off on your bike while you duck into the store…and possibly even keep them from wiggling the wheel out of the frame.”

Huh? The pedal is attached to the crank, not the frame, obviously. “A spike?” What spike? And how would the pedal keep a thief from removing a wheel?

aegisdesign
aegisdesign
5 years ago
Reply to  JasonK

The pedal has a QRD adaptor which you screw in to the end of the crank arm. The pedal slots in to the adapter and latches in. On the old QRD system the adaptor had a latch you pulled to release the hex pedal axle. See http://www.clasohlson.com/medias/sys_master/8895790022686.jpg

On the new system I think they’ve made it look better and you pull the black ring over the red part.

It’s quite handy as you just whip the pedals out and nobody can ride your bike. Great deterrent.

If you had a bag with you then no problem. Otherwise you ended up walking around with two pedals. I think what Tyler was getting at was that instead of carrying your pedals, the new lockable pedals allow you to lock the pedals to something else – street furniture or somewhere else on the bike other than in-situ.

aegisdesign
aegisdesign
5 years ago
Reply to  JasonK

I think “spike” should be “spoke” btw.

aegisdesign
aegisdesign
5 years ago

The removable pedals look like their old QRD system but with a key lock. The old QRDs had a sprung latch to hold it on. I had these on one of my bikes but there’s a couple of problems to be aware of.

1) the latch on the QRD used to get gummed up with commuter crud. I can’t imagine a key-lock lasting long in that kind of environment.

2) the hex axle slots in to the QRD adapter and clicks in. The only thing holding it in is the latch around the collar. It’s therefore a bit loose and after about 6 months wears even looser. I never had it come out, even with their SPD pedals. On a commuter bike you do a few miles on, this might not be a problem. On a bike you’re doing more miles on eg. a tourer, you’ll be plagued with squeaking and there’s nothing you can do about it.

3) the adapter increases the crank’s Q factor. I found it wasn’t great for my knees and ended up mid-tour buying a cheap set of Shimano 520s. Silence returned and my knees thanked me.

jasonmiles31
5 years ago

Does anyone make a half flat half clipless pedal were the weight is balanced so it is easier to clip in to the clipless side?

David Lewis
David Lewis
5 years ago
Reply to  jasonmiles31

I have used Shimano PD-A530 pedals for years on my commuter bike. They naturally hang vertically, so you run your foot forward over the top to clip in, and backward if you’re wearing street shoes. They’ve worked very well for me, and I see that Universal Cycles has them for $40.

Ed Ng
Ed Ng
5 years ago
Reply to  jasonmiles31

I run the Shimano PD-M520 in conjunction SM-PD22 flat pedal adapters on one side of each pedal, and I find that the weight of the flat pedal adapter causes the SPD side to stay topside so it is easier to ride clipless most of the time, but I still have the flat side underneath for the occasional non-SPD-shoe ride. It’s a fairly inexpensive combination to boot.

Jesse Edwards
Jesse Edwards
5 years ago

The flip flop pedal kinda sounds nice for winter. I’d rather be clipped in where possible, but sometimes snow gets packed in and it’s be nice to have this option.

B@se
B@se
5 years ago

Spike should be Spoke indeed.

http://en.wellgopedal.com/products_detail_0_261.htm

Details on the wellgo website.

Looks like a nice pedal for the traveler.

Bas

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