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Velocity adds wide, aero Quill road rims and wheels

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Velocity-USA_Quill-wide-aluminum-road-rims_Quill-rim-black

At the end of last year Velocity USA debuted a new road rim designed to bring the benefits of their more recent developments for the trail and disc brake crowds over to more traditional road bikes. Keeping a machined rim brake surface, the new Quill rims grow to a healthy 21.1mm internal width to offer a smoother ride and an overall stiffer wheel build. The Quill was essentially built to replace their long running A23 rim, and manages to improve on weight, stiffness, width, and aero characteristics. Take a closer look after the break at the rim, pricing, its many available iterations, and the possible wheel builds available through Velocity’s in-house The Wheel Department custom wheelbuilders…

Velocity-USA_Quill-wide-aluminum-road-rims_Quill-profile

The new rim builds on road rim tech that Velocity worked out on the Aileron disc rim, and ends up with an even lighter and more aerodynamic cross section. The new Quill has a blunt aero shape that is 24.5mm wide and 24.5mm tall. That leaves a base that opens up and widens most conventional narrow tires, and supports the growing catalogue of high performance wide road tires. At just 415g it remains reasonably light, shaving about 35g off its predecessor. Velocity say that it is easy to setup tubeless with their 21mm wide Velotape. The machined-sidewall 700c rims are available now in 20, 24, 28, 32 & 36 drillings in both anodized black and polished silver for $127 a piece.

Velocity-USA_Quill-wide-aluminum-road-rims_Quill-US-wheelset Velocity-USA_Quill-wide-aluminum-road-rims_Quill-Pro-wheelset

The Quill is being made available in 3 complete wheelsets, handbuilt by their own The Wheel Department in Grand Rapids, MI . The Quill U.S. wheels are built from all American-made parts with Industry Nine Torch Road hubs, 20/24 DT Swiss Competition spokes, and alloy nipples at 1,460g for $1,050. Quill Pro wheels use Velocity Race hubs, 20/24 lacing with Sapim CX Ray spokes, and alloy nipples to come in at just 1,395g and only $830. The Quill Comp wheelset also uses Velocity Race hubs, with a 24/28 DT Swiss Competition spoke lacing and brass nipples for a more durable build at 1,595g and $600 retail price.

VelocityUSA.com

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Birdman
Birdman
7 years ago

I was going to build a set of Pacenti sl23, but the Quill Comp looks good too! Having a hard time deciding now…

DJ
DJ
7 years ago

Almost looks like the Zipp 101 rim.

Alex
Alex
7 years ago

All American-made parts?
Are Sapim and DT-Swiss spokes made in the US?

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
7 years ago
Reply to  Alex

Sapim are made in Belgium. DT are Swiss and US, and if the DT spoke head stamp is really-really tiny those are made in Taiwan.

greg
greg
7 years ago

DT spokes for the North American market (and maybe more) are made in the US. Grand Junction, CO, I think.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

Looks like a major upgrade from the A23s. They’re still more expensive than Pacenti rims and aren’t welded like Pacenti rims are. Maybe I’m wrong but I’m guessing these are pinned and sleeved like most of their road rims. Also, is the drilling offset at all? They are a bit lighter though, at least their advertised weight. I’d maybe bit if these come in a wide range of colors but that’s the only way I’d pick these over Pacenti rims.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
7 years ago

Two things Velocity is famous for; soft alloy that dents easy and bulges at the spoke holes anything over 90kgf, and they have the worst balance out of any rim on the market due to the type of sleeve joint they use. Both sets of A23’s I’ve had dented at the bead hook and one completely burst a spoke hole. Have a set of Ailerons that are so unbalanced at speed felt like I was on a circus clown bike. Been riding the same set of Pacenti SL23’s for the last two years and I can say without hesitation that they are one of the best aluminum rimmed wheel sets I’ve ever owned. The Ailerons are being replaced soon with Pacenti SL25’s.

Unless Velocity made a huge change in raw materials and production with this new Quill rim I don’t see any reason to even consider the brand ever again. Too bad because their designs are good but the final product is extremely lacking. My LBS and a few others around town completely liquidated Velocity rims right out of their shops for these same reasons.

McClain
7 years ago

Sounds like maybe you (or whoever builds your wheels) build with too high spoke tension.

I’ve ridden multiple sets of Velocity rims with zero issues beyond the occasional broken spoke.
I’m only 70kg, but I rode a set of Ailerons with CX-Rays, 32h, fully loaded with about 50 pounds of gear over an 800 miles gravel road tour to DC, including a few country road sections with (paved) downhills exceeding 50mph.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
7 years ago

Your sample group only reflects the sets you personally own. Re-read the last sentence of my post. It’s not just me.

Robert Schlumpberger
Robert Schlumpberger
6 years ago

I’ve been pounding the daylight out of my Aerohead and Aerohead OC setup for years without a problem. Sapim 2.0-1.5-2.0 2X F 32 hole and 2.0=1.5-2.0 nds/2.0-1.8-2.0 ds R with allow nipples. No dents, no wobbles, no cracks, no re-truing. I’m at 86 kg and they have been perfect. And the best no questions asked warranty anywhere if you need it. I’m really happy with my old Aeroheads and would love to move up to the new Quill or even the A23 for the wider width. The Pacenti rims are great but Velocity makes a very competitive rim as well. The Quill should be as good as anything else in its class.

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