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Water Works Roundup – Filtration bottles and a wearable dehumidifier?

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Dry Active Technologies wearable dehumidifier, on back

It flows around the planet, through our bodies and even hangs in the air – as the basic ingredient for life itself, water is without a doubt the most important resource on planet earth. Athletes especially know the importance of staying hydrated, so in this roundup we’ll check out two new water filtration bottles that make that simple but significant task much easier in any setting.

Unfortunately once you’ve done your job hydrating yourself, perspiration can become a problem, especially under weatherproof jackets. To combat such clammy discomfort, Dry-Active technologies has created a wearable dehumidifier that helps keep your body and base layers dry…

Katadyn BeFree
Katadyn befree water bottle

Swiss water purification specialists Katadyn have just produced their smallest packable microfilter yet which is featured in the BeFree soft flask, the company’s new compactable water filtration bottle.

Katadyn partnered up with Hydrapak to create this 0.6L soft flask which can be squished down to fit in your pocket. The integrated 0.1 micron microfilter weighs just 58g, and removes 99.9999% of bacteria and protozoa, keeping you safe from harmful organisms like Cryptosporidium, Giardia, E-Coli and Salmonella.

Katadyn’s Free Flowing Channel filter technology allows for easy ‘no-suck’ water flow, so you don’t have to become a human vacuum to get a drink. The EZ-Clean Filter Membrane does not need to be backflushed, so the filter can be easily cleaned by simply shaking or swishing it out. Keep an eye on Katadyn’s website for updates and info on the BeFree bottle (no info is currently posted).

LifeStraw Go Bottle

Lifestraw Go bottle, apart

Also hailing from Switzerland, LifeStraw has just released an updated version of their Go water bottle. The Go bottle uses a two-stage filtration process to eliminate bacteria and protozoa in contaminated water and the new iteration also reduces organic chemicals, chlorine and bad taste.

A hollow filter membrane acts as stage one of filtration, removing 99.9999% of E-Coli and Salmonella bacteria, and 99.9% of protozoa including Giardia and Cryptosporidium. The membrane also filters out any particulate matter larger than 0.2 microns. At stage two, an activated carbon filter reduces chlorine, organic chemicals like pesticides or herbicides, and keeps your water tasting fresh and clean.

Lifestraw Go bottle, colors

The hollow fiber membrane has a lifespan of 264 gallons, but the carbon capsule will need more regular replacement at every 26 gallons. Replacement filters will be available as of July.

Lifestraw’s BPA and chemical-free bottle weighs less than 8 ounces, and holds 22 ounces of water. It features a flip-top bite valve and an attached carabiner. The Go bottle comes in five colors- pink, purple, grey, green or blue. The Go bottle is available now online and at Lifestraw retailers across North America. MSRP is $49.95 USD.

Dry-Active wearable dehumidifier

Dry Active Technologies wearable dehumidifier, product shot

There is one unfortunate byproduct of staying hydrated- perspiration. Even with technical base layers and shell fabrics, it’s hard to keep dry when you’re exerting yourself. To resolve this issue, Dry-Active Technologies has created a wearable dehumidifier to regulate moisture inside a waterproof or water resistant shell.

The Dry-Active dehumidifier collects moist air through two intake hoses and exchanges it for dry air, which then flows through your jacket. The designers claim the device keeps humidity within a human’s natural comfort level during physical activity.

The unit uses an on-board rechargeable battery for power and its filter can be re-filled with common materials or replaced with single-use cartridges. The device can be paired with a smartphone to control humidity settings or enable its automatic, self-regulating mode.

The Dry-Active weighs 1.9lbs, and measures 5.9″ wide by 11.8″ tall. The unit’s lower back panel is made from ‘ergo soft support’ material… but I am certainly dubious about how comfortable you could possibly be with this thing sitting against your back.

The Dry-Active can currently be pre-ordered for $95 USD, but the Kickstarter campaign still needs significant funding if the device is to see production. If successful, delivery is expected for June 2017.

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13 Comments
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i
i
6 years ago

I could spend an hour listing all the reasons I don’t believe that thing would work, but if they somehow made it (which I don’t believe for a second they did)… holy crap, that would be a serious contender for greatest invention in the history of mankind.

Tyler Durden
Tyler Durden
6 years ago
Reply to  i

Thermodynamics be damned! I once saw someone set up a portable AC unit exhausting into the middle of a heavily populated room. For a minute I thought about discussing Carnot cycles with them, but the irony was just to great to not let it happen.

Michael
Michael
6 years ago
Reply to  Tyler Durden

It seems pretty simple to me. You just need a way to move the humid air over chilled coils and collect the runoff. The challenge is that you need to essentially create a tiny battery powered air conditioner.

Collin
Collin
6 years ago

Don’t fall on that thing. Instead broken spine.

ascarlarkinyar
ascarlarkinyar
6 years ago

That movie “Dune” where precious water is recycled from your suit into a drinking bladder. And people were killed for the water in their bodies…..lol

Kevin
Kevin
6 years ago
Reply to  ascarlarkinyar

Wasn’t that the movie Tank Girl?

Ryan S.
Ryan S.
6 years ago

If that wearable dehumidifier works, I’m getting one to wear on a regular, daily basis…off the bike. Our triple digit heat index summers suck.

CowtownCyclist
CowtownCyclist
6 years ago

That dehumidifier looks ridiculous, but I could see it taking off as a proof of concept. Lot’s of people by those ridiculous socks and jackets with and electric heater built in, this is no more outlandish.

Dave
Dave
6 years ago

Electrically heated socks, jackets, etc. definitely serve a purpose under proper conditions. The dehumidifier, not so much. People have indeed died of hypothermia. No one ever died of hyperhumidia.

bart
bart
6 years ago

pack my jacket with silica gel packs.

Blabbidyblahh
Blabbidyblahh
6 years ago

Be careful. We sweat for a reason. The definition of heat stroke is when you don’t sweat

Bob Log
Bob Log
6 years ago
Reply to  Blabbidyblahh

ya… something that increases the evaporation rate of sweat would only improve your ability to regulate body temperature through sweating. That thing wouldn’t prevent you from sweating, just increase the rate at which the moisture from your sweat gets pumped out from under your waterproof gear.

typevertigo
typevertigo
6 years ago

The LifeStraw Go is an excellent idea, but it won’t fit a standard bottle cage. I have one of the original bottles. As it is, it’s meant to go into a pannier for extended bike tours.

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