Culprit Junior One youth road bike with Ultegra Di2

Culprit’s Interbike collection had several of the same adult frames, just with higher end builds moving things to the upper level of componentry. They’ll also start seeing some updated frame features soon, and we’ve got a sneak peek at those at the bottom.

The big news comes on the youth front. Originally, they offered two different kid’s frames, each in two sizes and all using 7005 alloy. The S1/S2 were the base level frames with external routing and fewer features. The Junior 1 and 2 upgraded to a carbon fork with chromoly steerer and an aero seat tube. For 2015, the models will all share the same frame, differentiated only by spec. By using a new frame manufacturer, they were able to reshape the tubes and drop weight. It keeps the rear brake’s internal routing, but loses the aero seat tube in favor of a round one. All told, the frames are about 120g lighter than before!

The real head turner, though, is the addition of an Ultegra Di2 build for under $2,300…

Culprit Junior One youth road bike with Ultegra Di2

The electronic parts are all here, giving your kid all the parts needed to shift by wire, and those that will fit their hands. The cranks are subbed for 140mm or 152mm length alloy models, with 40/32 or 46/36 CNC’d chainrings on the higher end Junior models.

Culprit Junior One youth road bike with Ultegra Di2

A round Ritchey seatpost not only allows for a wide range of adjustment, but also hides the seatpost battery.

Culprit Junior One youth road bike with Ultegra Di2

Headset spacer adapter holds the junction box since the stems are so short.

Culprit Junior One youth road bike with Ultegra Di2

Frames are Di2 and mechanical ready. So, you know, if you needed an upgrade for your own bike, this might be a cheap way to get Di2 and a high quality road bike for your kid. Just swap a few things around, order yourself a nice crankset and *bam* done. Of course, founder Josh Colp’s reasoning is less selfish. He says that unlike a Microshift setup, this group will grow with the child as they progress to larger and larger frames, helping get many miles out of the purchase.

Complete bike weights are about 16.3 pounds for the Junior 1 and 17.5lbs for Junior 2. The 650C wheeled Junior 2 Di2 retails for $2,350 plus S&H. The Junior 1, which gets 20″ wheels, comes in at $2,295 plus S&H. Check our review of the Culprit Junior here.

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For grown folks, the Croz Blade carries on with its stiff, somewhat aero disc-or-rim brake frame. We reviewed it here in one of its original builds, and spec has done nothing but improve since there. For starters, he’s swapped in Reynolds wheels on many of them.

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And the new top of the line spec gets a Shimano Dura-Ace 9070 build with Rotor Flow crankset and aero Q-rings. Wheels are Reynolds Aero 46 clincher, supporting a Blktec front cockpit, Token headset and Prologo saddle.

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Check out the Blktec components in our Eurobike coverage here.

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The bike can be converted to run TRP’s aero linear pull brakes, but this model comes with Shimano’s excellent hydraulic road disc brakes. This one’s shown with a Legion rotor, but bikes will ship with Centerlock rotors. Retail for the complete bike is $7,125 USD plus S&H.

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The bikes are shipping with standard QR forks for now, but things will move to thru axles in the near future. They had this prototype fork on hand to show the direction things are headed.

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CulpritBicycles.com and CulpritJunior.com

11 COMMENTS

  1. Its amazing how the industry acknowledges smaller wheels are needed for smaller people (youth), but that smaller adults can just get by on 700c wheels and the problems associated with it.

    My wife at 5′-3″ can bridge the gap to 700c wheels decently. Shorter than that, I really don’t see how its possible without significant drawbacks. Too bad everyone bought into the “slow” myth of 650c wheels.

  2. As opposed to spoiled adults? How is this any more insane than the poser who thinks he needs an $8000 bike with carbon aero wheels to ride a century?

  3. There is a real market for junior bikes and 20″ wheel bikes are very rare so this is serving an actual need and not just a showoff perception. There is even a market for higher end bikes for serious junior racers although a critical question for Culprit is whether they ship the bikes with the correct low geared junior cassettes or at least test roll out on the installed gearing to keep these bikes race legal.
    I also understand the issue with small adult bikes, my wife is 5’1″ with short legs and while her Orbea road bike is low enough for her to be comfortable on 700C wheels I had to convert her CX bike to 26″ wheels to get a low enough standover.

  4. Chris L,
    The major difference is that the adult likely worked for the $8k needed for their purchase. One could say they are fiscally irresponsible (which is a BIG assumption) and maybe overpaid (another BIG assumption) but hardly spoiled.
    The kid – spoiled “brat” is a personality and likely due to how they were raised.. I knew lots of rich kids with many things that knew they were lucky and were never brats about not getting something.

  5. I can wait for the day when when we don’t have to hear the simple folks carping about “poseurs” and we can instead just talk about bikes and riding them. I’m not sure what makes riders think they’re fit to judge what another person needs/deserves/has, but I’m glad I don’t have to ride with such judgmental “people.”

    As for the kids, JBikes is right. Being spoiled is the result of individual personality and how a kid was raised, not whether the kid has expensive bikes, toys, cars, or summat.

    As for the kid’s bike, it’s pretty cool. After the kid grows out of it, a person could sell the bike or better yet part it out and recoup a good deal of cash.

  6. Vastly overspecced. Most youth racers under 10 do just fine on the regular Islabikes Luath. I think the UK champion uses one. No point in having 2 front chainrings. The gear limits up to 12 years old are so low that its a waste of time, a wide(ish) range cassette will meet all their needs. Loosing a front ring also shaves half a kilo off the bike so really? Also, many under 10s dont know how to use 2 front chainrings. Still, I wont show this to my lad, it’ll give him ideas.

  7. what’s with that giant black block between the front derailleur and its mount? shouldnt be for Q-rings, that’s only a 52t. something’s odd about that.

  8. I saw some young juniors shredding at my local CX race this morning. Totally passing adults with di2. The kids were more deserving as far as riding is concerned. And that’s all what these things are for.

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