2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

For the most part, the Trek Factory Racing team appeared to be riding stock versions of the new Madone. Albeit, they’re the $13,650 Race Shop Limited version with the addition of an SRM power meter crankset, but it’s still mostly a bike you can buy off the showroom floor.

It’s stocked with plenty of Bontrager components, including the bar/stem, seatpost, saddle and wheels. But, in a departure from their usual spec, they’re not running housebrand tires…

2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

Melding parts’ shapes and functions into the fuselage seems to be the trend for new aero bikes this year, and the new Madone is among the most aggressively integrated (Specialized’s new Venge being the other). The center pull front brakes flow seamlessly into the fork, with the cable completely hidden behind a headtube fairing.

2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

All cables, hoses and wires run from inside the one-piece bar/stem combo into the frame. Compare the shape of the 2016 model to the 2015 Domane and Madone bikes behind it in several of the pics.

2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

The rear brake is also a direct mount, center pull design.

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Most aero road bikes that move the rear brake under the bottom bracket do so partly for aerodynamics, but also (usually) to claim improvements in compliance since they can better tune the seatstays without needing the reinforced sections to handle braking stresses. But Trek’s IsoSpeed decoupler puts a pivot between the seat tube and seatstay-top tube junction, allowing forces to pass by the seat tube and use its flex to create comfort. So, they can keep the seatstay bridge in place, which generally helps out with lateral stiffness.

2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

And this massive bottom bracket section should also keep things very stiff.

2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

Again, note the difference between the older models.

2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

The tires are Veloflex, and judging from the clincher wheels being used, they’re one of Veloflex’s Open Tubular tires. The mystery is which one, since the tread pattern on these only matched up with the Roubaix tubular (from Veloflex, not Specialized!). We didn’t get a chance to ask, but we’ve reached out to Trek for answers and will update if we hear back.

2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

“Go and Take It”

2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

The taller seatmast leading to a semi-traditional seatpost allows the brake cable to spit out the back of the tube for better aerodynamics. We’ve seen this plenty on custom bikes from NAHBS, but rarely on a production bike. The number plate holder is integrated into the cable stop.

2016 Trek Madone aero race  road bike for Trek Factory Racing Team at 2015 Tour de France

Team bikes are lined up outside the bus prior to the stage start. Most were aboard the new Madone, but some riders liked to keep their personalized models from a prior year on hand:

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Cancellara’s Spartan-themed Domane may not be the latest and greatest, but it still looks good.

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The Trek Speed Concept TT/Triathlon bikes carry over from their 2013 introduction

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…but are decked out with Bontrager’s new ultra bright tail light. Not a bad marketing ploy to run it in the world’s most famous bike race.

TrekBikes.com

19 COMMENTS

  1. All that effort kamtailing everything on that speed concept and they throw that light on there. I can’t be the only one this bothers.

  2. ^you’d be surprised, there are many races now that require riders to use lights for safety. It appears to mount a lot nicer than normal lights as well (although being a pro team they most likely got access to mounts the general public wont)

  3. They’re probably not running Veloflex tires tubeless. There are plenty of reasons to choose clinchers. Lower rolling resistance would be one. Maybe tradition is losing out?

    I’d like to know their reasoning as well.

  4. The “older” bikes you refer to seem to be the Emonda. A current model bike that is used for the big time mountain stages.

  5. Hey Pistolero, it’s been proven a million times over. Ultimately you can make a clincher with lower rolling resistance than a tubular. That’s not to say all clinchers are faster than all tubs, but clinchers can have a lower rolling resistance than tubs.

    Judging by your spelling mistakes, punctuation and grammar, maybe it’s you that should lay off the drinks hombre.

  6. Bike is gorgeous and tick all (my) boxes. Just wondering what the choices of stem length bar drop and bar width will be.

  7. RE: Pistolero – 07/20/15 – 6:37am
    lower rollign resistance a clincher than a tubular??? have you been drinking lately?

    Yes new clinchers have lower rolling resistance when paired with a latex tube. This is well documented on several websites as clinchers and tubulars are on par now.

    There are other reasons to run tubulars but rolling resistance is not one these days.

  8. @Antione: Handlebar + Stem combos are available in a number of different combos with stem length from 90-130mm and bar width from 40 – 44 cm. Get a project one so you can get the right bar + stem combo right away versus having to pay for a second bar after your bike fitting.

  9. Colin…you talking about Tufos? They’re notoriously slow tires if you are. They’re fine for cyclocross but they’re slower than many heavy, flat resistant tires like a Conti 4-Season…worthless on the road unless all you want is the flat resistance with sealant in there.

    ***Personal evidence. I’ve broken 52 in a few 40K TTs. When I had tubulars(where the wheels were supposed to also be faster…from the same companies own data) I had trouble breaking 53 and went back to clinchers and was back to where I was before. I will never have tubulars on a TT bike EVER again. For road racing? Sure

  10. Maybe those tires tested better in the ‘tunnel. It be marvelous to think they did it for the mechanics’ sake. Hmmm….

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