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Beijing based startup IN SENTH has been cooking up an interesting concept in cycling specific augmented reality eyewear. The SENTH IN1 AR glasses have been simmering over several years of development (the first concepts for the design were in 2012) and four rounds of functional prototypes and are finally ready for public consumption. This system keeps your eyes on the road and off of your handlebars, supplementing your existing riding experience with smart interfacing with your phone and existing ANT+ sensors…

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The SENTH IN1 Augmented Reality system has been designed to do it all. The eyewear comes packaged with an array of lenses to support sunny daytime to low light conditions. The display is mounted at the end of an arm on the right side of the glasses, an arm which also contains a camera, battery, microphone, a manual touch controller, and audio output. The whole system folds up when not in use, so you can keep it in a smaller case.

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It displays data from your existing ANT+ or Bluetooth 4.0 compatible sensors, outputting speed, cadence, distance, etc., as you ride. It also syncs with your phone to help navigate and keep you abreast of incoming calls and messages.

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You can choose to interface with your SENTH IN1 in a variety of ways. There is a button pad that mounts to your handlebars which you can either tap or roll your finder over to select options on your display. If your touch pad is not attached to the cycle you’re on, you can manually scroll through the menu utilizing a local controller on the side of the arm. If you’re not a tactile person, you have the option of speaking to the device through a series of programmed commands to help navigate.

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There are several interesting experiential features also. You can listen to music through the device to liven up your ride. You can also take and post photos or videos utilizing the display. There is also a danger detection function which seeks out and identifies oncoming cars or obstacles in case you can’t see them. The device is interesting because it is so social and interactive in ways that both are and are not necessarily competition based. There is a function that shows you where other cyclists are nearby on a map so you can meet up with them and ride together. And if you’re in a special physical location, you can leave notes for others to see and read.

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If you move quickly, you can take advantage of the “Fastest Bird” discount, $199 for a SENTH IN1 system (SENTH IN1, IN1 thumb controller, four interchangeable lens) in your choice of black or white frames, though more colors will be available if stretch goals are met.

Indiegogo.com

38 COMMENTS

  1. In less than 3 years race riders will be using something similar, converting actual video of their previous runs or others into a digital display showing upcoming corners, hazards etc. Lots of old men here need to think outside the box, oh unless you are a purist…… (on your carbon bike etc)

  2. Spend your money so you can be fully out of the moment, be less safe, isolate yourself from those around you, and take pictures and videos no one will ever care to see. I have no doubts they’ll make a ton of money off of this.

  3. @Rob- my memory works quite well for remiding me of corners and hazards from previous laps or rides. It’s free and never runs out of batteries.

    Even though I have worked in tech for 30 years I think many people spend too much time behind their screens. Put the phone down and interact with the real world.

  4. Having worked on similar products I can tell you that with such a small compartment on the right battery life is going to be very short.
    I got out of my involvement with this type of product having decided that anything that distracts the biker/skier is a bad idea.
    They always show augmented reality navigation, but what it is really for is reading your text messages while you ride. Not a good idea.

  5. Girl in the movie needs to have her helmet fit correctly. She looks like the 6 year old down the street. If she falls like that it will provide absolutely no frontal protection. Nice bangs though…lol

  6. You mean I would have to take off my glasses in order to take a selfie? Just kidding.. I can actually see some utility in this sort of thing but the Recon Jet has been in the wild for a few months now and I have yet to hear any glowing commentary.

  7. In five years many of us will be riding with something vaguely similar.
    I can understand the resistance to heads up directions on turns etc., but frankly it doesn’t matter even a little bit what retro-grouches think. It’s coming, no stopping it.
    Of course, what we need is proper sunglasses without an obstructed view, but will the data possibilities of, say, a Garmin 500 or 520 is about where it will be… controllable by something like the hidden buttons in the horns of Di2 9070 shifters.
    Two or three bits of data in a heads up would be safer, and make the data more usable, since you could check it without looking down. It also would be a couple watts more aero than a Garmin stuck out in the wind.
    At that point, we won’t need an instrument… less crap on the bike, etc, etc.
    Garmin better be on it, or eventually someone else will get it right.
    Of course, this ain’t it. Recon neither.

  8. Greek Grouse – “be less safe”? You missed the point about “keeps your eyes on the road and off of your handlebars”. Would you say that HUDs make fighter pilots less safe?

    Actual safety or danger is all about implementation details – brightness, position, size etc – and how you choose to use it. Reading facebook while riding might lead to Darwin awards, so clever designers won’t implement that, and smart users won’t request it.

  9. Rob gets it. This is coming, guys. You will be buying, using and enjoying it when the tech has evolved to the point where it’s safe and easy to use, doesn’t hinder your side vision, looks less bionic, and is cheaply mass produced. The people who see this are the early adopters who contribute to maturing the tech. The people who don’t will be buying it later when it’s not nerdy anymore, and think they are trendy and modern. See also: Smartphones, cell phones in general, digital watches, pneumatic tires… etc.

    Not gonna buy this one though. The handlebar control is a nice touch, but the side vision impairment is nasty, and also the one-sided weight distribution. The Recon seems nicer, and also the Laster SeeThru.

  10. Eric “Put the phone down and interact with the real world” – Your bike interferes with how you interact with the real world. Better put it down and start jogging!

  11. Gunner, in one post admonishes someone for stating the obvious safety issues, then in the next you mention how those issues need to be fixed. Not sure if your comparison between recreational cycling at 20mph and piloting a war machine at 2000mph is valid, especially since some of us ride with our computers out of view, because you know, fun.

  12. Maybe on your weekend flatbar bike, but that is dead in the way of any frontal vision on a roadbike and significantly blocks side vision as well.

  13. @Gunnstein – the only difference is that fighter pilots dont use HUDs which block half of the view. And they actually NEED the info displayed on the HUD, not just WANT it because it’s soooo much fun to be able to read text/facebook messages while riding.

  14. this one actually used to text friends and sh*t. also hampers visibility and focus. not sure why its even defended. doesnt matter that the tech will evolve.. it always does. what matters is that current tech is ridiculous and unsafe.

    huds in planes are much better quality and do not affect visibility btw… oh also a plane is not a plane anyway. basically, senseless argumentation

  15. Well, now they look a little bulky, but given time they’ll be smaller. Perhaps not something you’ll use all the time, but if you’re cycling on unknown roads trying to find a route, could be useful.

    Not having to look down when going downhill has to be a plus…It’ll be interesting to see what version 2 looks like.

  16. I will say this or the recon would be really nice when doing intervals, etc that require keeping a certain wattage. It is better than looking down at your Garmin.

    No comments needed on why do intervals etc and just go ride your bike. I do that too but I also like to be ready for races I do and this would be a seemingly safer way to watch power.

  17. As much as I don’t want to like this, it is really impressive compared to google the recon, garmin, and all the other stuff.

    Make it an attachment for other glasses and it won’t be hideous either.

    On another note, what a lovely accent. “Naturar”

  18. I don’t need any of the photo/social-networking features, but I’d love to have a HUD and button-activated rear-facing camera to better see what’s behind me before I change lanes. Rather than building the tech into the glasses, perhaps it could be built into the helmet.

  19. “Gunner, in one post admonishes someone for stating the obvious safety issues, then in the next you mention how those issues need to be fixed.”

    “Gunner?” That other person did not give a clear argument for WHY he thought it unsafe, so there was no reason to assume he had thought it through.

    “Not sure if your comparison between recreational cycling at 20mph and piloting a war machine at 2000mph is valid”

    Some use HUDs in cars. No matter if your speed is 30, 80 or 1500 km/h, the point is the same: Looking where you’re going is generally safer than looking down at an instrument panel. Not if you use it for facebook, but basic metrics and navigation, yes.

    “especially since some of us ride with our computers out of view, because you know, fun.”

    I ride with a computer in view, because I hate fun. Uh, right 🙂

  20. @WG “the only difference is that fighter pilots dont use HUDs which block half of the view. And they actually NEED the info displayed on the HUD, not just WANT it because it’s soooo much fun to be able to read text/facebook messages while riding.”

    I think we all agree that this particular HUD implementation is bad for the view. I’m arguing agaist the luddite “all bike HUDs are bad no matter how it’s done” attitude of many here.

    As for NEED ws. WANT, how many of us NEED bike computers? We’d be perfectly able to ride without them. Come to think of it, we’d be perfectly able to get around without the bikes, too. Let’s walk! 🙂

  21. @buf “current tech is ridiculous and unsafe.” This particular one, yes. Others seem much better. And soon enough the tech will be excellent.

    “huds in planes are much better quality and do not affect visibility btw… oh also a plane is not a plane anyway. basically, senseless argumentation”

    A plane is not a plane? And I’m the one with senseless argumentation? Better proofread your own arguments 😀

  22. Kristofer – On that topic, I think no camera solution can compete with a simple head-mounted mirror – for cost, view quality, weight and practical usability – for now at least. (Eventually they will get good enough, of course.)

  23. These looks absolutely fantastic. I agree for group rides they won’t be that useful but when going off on your own this is the way forward. For those that think this will be distracting – it wont. Eurofigher pilots fly the most complex aircraft in the world with this technology. The human brain as a wonderful ability of focusing on what it needs to. It has got to be safer than constantly looking down and the ability to live feed video though a phone has got to be a potential life saver if someone has a serious accident. I love the idea of taking pics as well – just need a way of integrating with strava and away we go.

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