miranda timelapse pro titanium 1x single chainring for TT and triathlon bikes

Miranda is one of the largest private label crank arm manufacturers around, and they do it all in house in Portugal rather than moving everything to Asia. It’s a family owned and operated business that’s largely remained behind the scenes, though they do occasionally pop some interesting high end products out with their own branding.

The latest is the Timelapse Pro track crankset with 46 to 60 tooth chainrings, all made in full titanium to remain super stiff at the largest sizes. They tested it at the local velodrome to get immediate rider feedback, then raced back to the factory to perfect it…

miranda timelapse pro titanium 1x single chainring for TT and triathlon bikes

It gets titanium bolts, nuts and spindle to save weight.

miranda timelapse pro titanium 1x single chainring for TT and triathlon bikes

The solid 144bcd spider and crank arm are alloy to keep the pricing (TBD) in check. It’s not their first titanium chainring, they’ve been making them for mountain bikes for a while now:

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They’re now offering a fat bike spindle on the Infinium crankset, and they can make Shimano or SRAM spindles, too.

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Eschewing the narrow-wide craze for a more specially shaped tooth profile, their titanium Chainflow rings’ design has been further refined for better chain retention. And because they don’t use a narrow wide pattern, they can make them in odd numbers, too. Sounds small, but they sponsor the Portuguese enduro champion, who’s using a 35T and says the extra speed on the downhill sections compared to a 34 gives him an edge.

Miranda’s invested in new equipment to speed up the machining of the titanium spindles. Bolts switch to titanium to save about 20g from the crankset, too. It’s more expensive to do this, but this isn’t a mid-range product.

Working on double and triple chainring sets that will use cold forged chainrings with their own shifting ramp and pin profiles…which are being made to satisfy OEM demand.

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Shown in the center are what look like titanium singlespeed cogs, but they’re not. They’re carburized steel chainrings for e-bikes, which sit behind the colorful chain guards shown on the left. Carburization is a heat treatment process by which the steel is heated in the presence of vaporized carbon, which it absorbs, and then is cooled rapidly to produce a tough exterior while the center of the piece retains the typical strength and ductility of steel.

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They’re used for their growing e-bike business. Miranda says they already make the cranks for a big chunk of the market, and with increased options that’s only likely to expand.

The new mini chainguide ring can be adjusted to offset from the frame in any increment to fit OEM requirements. They’re mated to cold forged cranks, and the process is fully automated and controlled to be constant from batch to batch. This gives their OEM customers the confidence that things will always have the best quality, which reduces warranty headaches for the bike companies. They can make cranks from 150mm to 175mm with various Q-factors.

The ICG (integrated chain guide) for the Bosch motor system can be customized in color and shape to keep your clothes clean and prevent the chain from jumping off. Nano coating improves longevity.

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Chainrings for Bosch moots go up to 40 teeth. They’re also available for belt drives.

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If anodized colors aren’t your thing, they can do wet-dip graphics, too.

Miranda.net

7 COMMENTS

  1. @Luis They had a plethora of cranks of various types there. Unfortunately, I stopped by when the show wasn’t open, so I could only check out their displays, and not talk to anyone. The only commonality was that spline interface.

  2. “Carburization is a heat treatment process by which the steel is heated in the presence of vaporized carbon, which it absorbs, and then is cooled rapidly to produce a tough exterior while the center of the piece retains the typical strength and ductility of steel.”

    This is also known as “case hardening” and the process has been around for centuries.

  3. Hooray! Just monster-tall teeth instead of narrow/wide! Looks like someone else thinks that’s the real answer to chain retention (with clutch derailleur too of course). Anyone besides the Portuguese enduro champion tried these yet?

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