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We’ve mentioned the tumultuous ownership changes Blue Competition Cycles has undergone over the past few years. Started in Georgia by a few passionate cyclists, the brand was acquired by an investment firm before finally being purchased by the actual manufacturing partner that was making their bikes. That factory, located in Taiwan, also builds bikes for other major brands. Their stated goal for Blue is to use it as a showcase brand for what they can do.

That said, many of their models carry over with simple spec updates, which is fine since their bikes were already good. That, and they showed off several new items at PressCamp this summer.

For interbike, three items headlined the immediate changes. First up is the all-new Triad SL Elite triathlon bike. Priced at $8,888, the biggest difference is an integrated front brake inside a nose cone, behind which is a redesigned front end to better match the new shaping up front…

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The BB section gets a new, bumped out cowl to hide the cables and rear brake and smooth the air flow coming onto that section and the rear wheel.

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Spec includes a Vision Metron bar and crank, Dura-ace Di2 and Aerus carbon 88mm deep wheels. They’re claiming it’s a
4.8lb (2,177g) frameset with brakes.

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The second big intro is at the opposite end of the price spectrum. The Blue Andaz is a $1,100 full carbon road bike with Shimano 105 on FSA Omega cranks. Details like full internal routing, carbon fork and tapered headtube mean you’re not skimping on features to get onto a carbon frame. Aerus cockpit, brakes and wheels help them hit that price point but should provide plenty of miles before the beginning roadie needs to upgrade.

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The Crew SP M140 is a carbon version of the alloy trail mountain bike we saw at PressCamp.

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Frame weight wasn’t available, but expect it to be a bit lighter and stiffer than the alloy version. Spec includes SRAM GX1 1×11, Rockshox Sektor/Monarch/Reverb, DT Swiss wheels and Hutchinson tires for $2,800. Available in November.

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We saw the Prosecco EX G at PressCamp, but like the looks enough to give it a second bump. It is their gravel spec but same frame as the Prosecco EX road bike. It’ll get Hutchinson gravel tires (not the city slicks shown there), with an alloy seatpost but FSA SL-K carbon handlebar and Aerus carbon wheels. Frame weigh is claimed at 2.4lb (1,088g), retail is $2,800, ships in November.

RideBlue.com

4 COMMENTS

  1. I think something was lost in translation when the company was acquired by the Taiwanese company. Maybe because the traditional Chinese word for blue is 青 blue/green? That doesn’t explain the orange one though.

    • Why doesn’t anyone call Blue out on the way they screwed people during their “downtime” waiting on their financing to get bikes to the mainland. I got robbed of a thousand dollars because they sold our their existing inferior inventory and them closed down operations while their New England owners decided how to get their inventory from China to start all over again. A thousand freaking dollars. Thanks, Blue! Hope you make all the money you can while taking no responsibility for the way “ended” your first phase!

  2. Hard to imagine they bought the rights to such a bland generic name like ‘blue’. If you’re going to do color, why not Indigo, cyan, or cobalt? The bikes though: they pretty much sum up the state of bike design in 2016. Nice but very generic, an amalgamation of dozens of other bike designs.

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