Ibis already let the cat out of the bag with the help of their EWS enduro team in Ireland, but there is a new Mojo HD. Specifically, the new HD4 which seems perfectly tailored to the extreme demands of enduro racing at the highest level. Of course, that should make the bike excellent for steep rowdy trails as well, while maintaining the pedal friendly nature of the DW-link suspension system. The bike is longer, slacker, stiffer, fits more droppers on more riders and almost every 27.5″ tire you would want to run on a true enduro rig…

Drawing heavily from the input and feedback of the EWS race team, the new HD4 does not hide its enduro podium aspirations. It’s fitting then that for the second race in a row, their team holds the lead for the overall team championship on various version of the new bike. Now kitted up on the new Fireball Red HD4s, the team seems to be very happy with the finished product.

A big part of that seems to come down to the new geometry with was carefully tuned to offer the best mix of control on steep trails, cornering and off camber stability, and an increased fit range. Ibis says that the reach has basically gone up one size plus a bit more for each (meaning the reach for the medium is now what a large was, plus a bit), while the seat tube lengths have gone down a size. Along with deeper bores in the seat tubes, Ibis claims this results in the ability for most riders to fit 170mm dropper posts on all but the small frame, which should accommodate 150mm droppers for most riders. There are some medium frames out there that struggle to fit a 150mm dropper for a lot of riders, so if this is true, then it’s a huge leap forward in dropper to rider sizing. Ibis also gets huge marks for listing the individual minimum and maximum ride heights for their most popular droppers in multiple dropper lengths and on all frame sizes.

The frame runs a fairly slack 64.9° head tube angle, 74° seat tube angle, 430mm chainstays, and 343mm BB height.

Keeping with their tried and true dw-link suspension, Ibis says the system does use the new V5 kinematics from Dave Weagle, calling it the “most efficient system to date.” Additionally, the links gain a boost in stiffness with the upper link a 30% improvement and the lower 40% better. While the lower link is specific to the HD4, the upper link it retrofittable to current frames for an increase in stiffness. Tweaks in the carbon layup have also added to the overall frame stiffness.

Thanks to some creative carbon placement, a piggy back shock like the Fox X2 (available as an upgrade) just barely fits in the frame. However, the efficient use of space allows for a 22oz water bottle to fit inside the frame triangle for all sizes.

The standard shock is also from Fox, though it appears to be a new model that is not quite ready for release. We should have more on this in a few weeks.

Ibis was on the forefront of the wide rim phenomenon, which ended up working out quite well especially as tires grew. Compatible with 27.5 x 2.3 – 27.5 x 2.8″ tires, Ibis claims that the BB height remains about the same for all sizes once tire sag is taken into account. However, it looks like all of their complete builds will ship with 27.5 x 2.6″ Maxxis Wide Trail tires and their own 738 or 742 wheels.

Frame details include 153mm of travel, a threaded bottom bracket, ISCG05 compatibility with an adapter, and Boost spacing.  There’s also a polycarbonate bolt on down tube protector and a chainstay/seatstay protector. Cable routing is a mix of internal and external and it also gives you the option to run full length housing or interrupted housing which will save you about 55g.

Available in Fireball Red or Anejo Silver & Lime, the HD4 will be shipping world wide starting June 15th. Pricing starts at $2,999 for the frame with the standard (yet to be announced) rear shock, and $4,199 for the SRAM NX build with Ibis 738 aluminum wheels. The builds top out with the XX1 Eagle and Ibis 742 carbon wheel package at $9,399. There are also options for Ibis 742 wheel upgrades (with or without Industry Nine hubs), and Plus size Nobby Nic tires (27.5 x 2.8″).

Details:

  • Accepts 27.5″ tires in 2.3″, 2.5″, 2.6 and 2.8″ Plus size
  • dw-link suspension, as always
  • Boost 148mm rear/110 Front axle
  • 6” (153mm) of rear wheel travel
  • Carbon fiber monocoque frame and swingarm
  • 160mm Travel fork recommended, approved for 170mm
  • Weight for the frame and shock, size large, gloss finish: 6.6 lbs (2.98 Kg)
  • 64.9º head angle
  • Standard Shock: Fox Float 7.875×2.25″ with custom damping settings
  • Upgrade Shock: Fox Float X2, with climb switch, 7.875×2.25″, rider-tunable damping settings
  • ISCG 05 compatible with removable adapter is available
  • Threaded bottom bracket
  • Super versatile internal cable routing including internal dropper routing
  • Included polycarbonate down tube cable guard
  • Chain stay length: 16.9″
  • 160mm post mount, 203mm maximum rotor size
  • Tapered Head Tube and Steerer
  • Dual row angular contact bearings on the drive side of the lower link. Large 28mm x 15mm x 7mm radial bearings on the non-drive side for stiffness and long wear
  • BB height with tire sag is the same with 2.3 – 2.8 tires

Frame specs:

  • Seatpost Diameter 31.6mm
  • Front Derailleur Direct Mount
  • Bottom Bracket 68mm (BSA) English Thread
  • Rear Shock Specification 7.875″ x 2.25″
  • Rear Axle 12 x 148mm BOOST
  • Rear Brake 160mm Post Mount
  • Chain guide compatibility ISCG 05
  • Max Rear Rotor 203mm
  • Headset Mixed Tapered (ZS 44 upper / ZS 56 lower)

ibiscycles.com

5 COMMENTS

  1. Everyone seems to love the new paint scheme except for me… This is probably the first time I find an Ibis, any Ibis, with a paint scheme I dont like. The curves are still sexy as heck though.

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