After 30 years of tinkering with his idea for a simple, effective fender, Chris Howard is finally bringing it to life. According to the inventor, his first crude prototype was made nearly 30 years ago, but the idea is the same – a fender that quickly attaches to your bike without having to touch your frame.

Quickguard fender replaces Quick Release nut for fenders that won't touch the frame

OK, technically it will touch your frame in one spot, but it appears to be no different than how your current quick release nut touches the dropout. That’s what makes the fender install and removal so simple – all it requires is removing the current QR nut, and then threading the QR skewer into the Quickguard nut which is attached to the mono-strut for the fender.

Quickguard fender replaces Quick Release nut for fenders that won't touch the frame Quickguard fender replaces Quick Release nut for fenders that won't touch the frame Quickguard fender replaces Quick Release nut for fenders that won't touch the frame

Quickguard fender replaces Quick Release nut for fenders that won't touch the frame

Compatible with both front and rear quick release axles, the fender can be adjusted once installed with micro adjusting screws at the top for side to side movement, and additional spacers to raise the fender for bigger tires. Meant to fit bikes with 700c wheels, and measures 43mm wide so it should be good for at least a 700c x 42mm tire.

Quickguard fender replaces Quick Release nut for fenders that won't touch the frame Quickguard fender replaces Quick Release nut for fenders that won't touch the frame

The fender itself will be made from plastic but the strut is aluminum which adds up to about a 219g weight for the prototype, though the production fender is expected to be less. One of the biggest advantages of the system seems to be a rattle free design which is the result of the thick aluminum strut.

Still in the prototype phase, Chris is hoping that Kickstarter will finally bring his design to life with an expected delivery of April 2018 if successful. By taking advantage of the Super Early Bird deal, you can get a pair of fenders for about $54.

kickstarter.com

40 COMMENTS

  1. Good idea but why wouldn’t you just make the guard longer or add a small flap? No one is going get their back side wet just so the rider behind stays clean.

      • Yes, Chris. I realize it can move up or down, but would anyone stop their ride to adjust it…several times depending on if they are ahead or behind other riders? Not likely. Just make it longer and you don’t have to choose who gets the spray. But thru axle will make this product obsolete anyways.

        • There’s an option available for thru axles too. You don’t need to stop and adjust it. Just set it before you start riding, the fender covers the wheel from the 7 oclock to the 12 oclock position which will both protect you and the riders behind you. Its been designed to be the perfect length – full protection plus lightweight plus minimal parts.

  2. For thru axles there should be a simple solution that may require a custom made thru axle (with internal threading as well as external thread whereby the internal thread can have a ‘skewer attachment’ for the mudguard nut)

    • The Quickguard provides superior protection from road spray covering the wheel from the 7 oclock to 12 oclock positions stopping 100% of the water to your rear and the riders behind you – Qbicle can’t do that.

  3. Genetic makes one called the Carbon Micro Fender. I remember seeing either this one or something very similar on bikerumor years ago but I can’t find the original post. It was marketing shpeal was “you have a light bike, why not have a light fender” and had a video of a bike on a trainer or something similar and put water on the wheel to show the spray and did a comparison of before and after.

  4. What about socketed dropouts (Ritchey style) and/or bikes with RD cables exiting right next to the dropout (like a Colnago CX1)

  5. interesting, but in the end it looks like a case of different for different’s sake, rather than any practical advantages. Why not just make their own skewer and support the rack from both sides? Triangulation is would let them make it lighter and stiffer. By the time you’ve fully unwound the skewer from the nut, you may as well just pull it out and be done, there’s minimal time saving involved.

  6. Beautiful, simple, elegant idea! I rarely need a fender, but when I do I just want to quickly mount it and ride in the rain. With 10 bikes in the garage for the wife and I, only 2 have QR and they are the outdated CX bikes with rim brakes that were retired 2 years ago, but too loved to sell. Even our road bikes have thru axles now. beer’s gone, band left, qr was a hella party for several decades though!

  7. I have owned two sets of “Tangential” fenders by “bikesmart Tangential SL” and the Qbicle model mentioned earlier in the thread. The brittle plastic (not carbon fiber!!) fender shattered, when even gently fastening it to the aluminum stay!! The makers needed to use more traditional materials for the actual fender that would make it durable and SEMI-FLEXIBLE, so as to not shatter!
    That being said, I have never had such incredible water protection, when dialed in, at the 10’Oclock position, water would not hit me or the rider behind. I did a 70 mile Grasshopper race in Sonoma County and everyone was fighting over a wheel that had a tangential fender!!

    • the Quickguard will be made from a Chromoplastic material making it very durable but also flexy to take knocks. The Quickguard provides superior protection from road spray covering the wheel from the 7 oclock to 12 oclock postions stopping 100% of the water to your rear and the riders behind you.

  8. Neat execution, but the idea has indeed been done by Qbicle about three years ago. Qbicle’s actual fenders weren’t anywhere near this long though – more like 1/3 or even 1/4 the length.

    Not sure they’re all that great as front fenders, though. There’s a reason why proper front fenders project a ways forward of the fork crown: when riding at higher speeds, that is the only thing preventing you from eating a mouthful of murky street water.

    • The one Quickguard can be used for the rear or front wheel. When used on the front the fender end is lower than the pedals at the bottom stroke, this is what prevents the spray from hitting your feet as you ride forward. On bikes with larger clearances the fender can be place under the fork crown if desired.

  9. Hey Chris- what about thru axles? Kidding, I saw your many responses about that.
    I love this fender. Thanks. It’ll likely end up on a project I’m trying to avoid.

    Good luck.
    -ODT

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