Java Bikes is a Singapore brand that has a wide range of standard and aero road bikes, various mountain bikes, and plenty of youth and folding bikes in their mostly generic catalog. So it was a pleasant surprise to find this forward-looking aero road bike in their booth. The frame has a single pivot, short travel design relying on a short, firm elastomer to take the edge off bumps and potholes…something we could see having a lot of potential in the gravel segment. Here, though, it’s strictly designed around the road.

Java Tempo full suspension short travel road bike with aerodynamic stem hides the cables

A yoke connects the oversized, rectangular chainstays to the seatstays, which along with the oversized pivot bearings encircling the bottom bracket should keep the rear end stiff.

Java Tempo full suspension short travel road bike with aerodynamic stem hides the cables

The elastomer felt very stiff, suggesting it won’t be overly active and suffer from pedal bob, but still be able to mitigate harder hits from square-edge impacts like potholes. Likely, it’ll also reduce vibrations a bit.

Java Tempo full suspension short travel road bike with aerodynamic stem hides the cables

Java Tempo full suspension short travel road bike with aerodynamic stem hides the cables

We’re guessing the Deca (Dega?) cranks are a house brand, but the Asian halls are full of crankset and chainring manufacturers showing similar items, including the one-piece double chainrings.

Java Tempo full suspension short travel road bike with aerodynamic stem hides the cables

The other interesting part of this bike is the aero stem, which routes some of the cables under a cover plate and out the back to hide them from the wind.

Java Tempo full suspension short travel road bike with aerodynamic stem hides the cables

Java Tempo full suspension short travel road bike with aerodynamic stem hides the cables

We’re seeing more and more of these types of stem concepts pop up.

Java Tempo full suspension short travel road bike with aerodynamic stem hides the cables

They had another iteration on this TT bike that worked with center pull aero brakes…

Java Tempo full suspension short travel road bike with aerodynamic stem hides the cables

…by routing the cable around a pulley wheel and out the bottom of the stem.

JavaBikes.com.sg

11 COMMENTS

    • Keeping complete bike costs low while allowing the user to choose the ideal wheel pair for their bike, factoring in rim depth, tire type, etc…

    • Roddy,
      That limit cost and do not charge Customer for an “extra” pair of wheel they may: already have / don’t like / don’t need.

    • On a mtn bike this would be stupid (rear only) but on the road its your back that takes the hits. Ones arms do a great job of dealling with bumps and vibrations. Especially with aero bikes where all the tube shaping and deep dish wheels take away from the vertical compliance.
      Treks madone is a great example of a focus on rear end compliance on an aero bike with ther’e flexing seatmast.

  1. Hmm, that povoting bottom bracket and another pair of bolt holes just above the suspension.
    -I think when the suspension is not in used, the seat stay can attach directly to the seat tube’s another pair of mounting holes, creating a rigid rear end.
    -since whole rear end is rotatable and chainstay is wider than seat tube, can we rotate the rear end all the way so that the bike FOLD in half when pack for travel? It looks to be doable.

    • By attaching the seat-stays to the seat tube, as you suggest, would lower the bottom bracket and slacken the headtube–which would cause adverse handling characteristics.
      And to fold it, as you suggest, would require those cables routed above the bottom bracket to be longer and possibly bend in a less than an ideal way. That would require a redesign to accommodate.

  2. Java also makes some pretty slick mini velos.

    The one-piece double chainring reminds me of similar stuff built by LitePro, which is a Chinese parts manufacturer best known for aftermarket parts for folding bikes (specifically Dahon and Tern, but also now catering to Fnhon and Crius, who use very similar tube sizes to Dahon foldies). There’s a fair chance the crank came from them.

  3. Java store down the road from me here in Chanthaburi Thailand. Can confirm incredible value and a Chinese company.

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