Trek announced an updated and expanded e-bike range for serious dirt riding. First up, they improved and refined the Powerfly e-MTB with improved spec and new options for the latest 2020 Bosch motor systems. Next, the Rail is an all-new full suspension e-MTB, meant for true all-mountain riding with 160mm front, 150mm rear travel.

2020 Trek Rail & Powerfly e-MTB range

Trek has been in the e-MTB game for a few years now, but they greatly expanded and updated the line for 2020. The Rail is an all-new, All-Mountain ride designed for hard use with beefy fork legs, 4-piston brakes, and suspension technology borrowed from their established non-e-bikes. The Powerfly carries over, but receives updates with new spec, and the latest Bosch motors. North American models use a 20mph limit for pedal assist, with European models limited to 25km/h.

The Rail has 160mm front travel paired with 150mm rear on all models. The bike is designed around 29″ wheels and tires only, with no compatibility with 27.5″ or 27.5″ Plus.

The Rail uses Trek’s Mino Link 2-position adjustable rear suspension design, set in the low position from the factory.

Big brakes come from the factory to stop all of that e-bike mass. The rear brake mount comes stock with 180mm rotors, but is compatible with up-to-203mm using the appropriate adapter.

The Rail has clearance for 2.6″ tires, with Bontrager SE5 or XR5 29×2.6″ tires coming stock.

Bosch’s latest Performance Line CX motor delivers 75nm of torque, in a smaller and lighter package than previous systems. Bontrager’s RIB battery system uses a key for removal, housing Bosch’s 500 Wh or new 625 Wh batteries (model dependent).

SRAM 12-speed drivetrains handle gear changing duties. We noticed that there is very tight clearance between the chain and chainstay in the 10t cog, similar to the new Fuel EX.

Trek’s Knock Block steering system keeps the front-end in check, while Bosch’s display unit keeps tabs on battery life.

Four sizes are available in both carbon and alloy, with geometry listed above in both suspension configurations.

Spec & Pricing

Four models will be available in the US, with additional spec options available in select markets. Complete bike weights have not been released to us as of this writing.

The Rail 5 ($4,999) has a Rockshox 35 Gold RL fork, Deluxe RL rear shock, and SRAM SX drivetrain.

The Rail 7 ($5,999) has a Rockshox Yari RC fork, Deluxe RL rear shock, and a Shimano SLX / XT drivetrain.

The rail 9.7 ($6,499) has a Rockshox Yari RC fork, Deluxe RL rear shock, and SRAM NX Eagle drivetrain.

The Rail 9.9 ($11,999) has a Rockshox Lyrik Ultimate fork, Deluxe RT3 rear shock, and SRAM Eagle AXS drivetrain.

Rail availability will begin in the Fall of 2020, with Project One custom options starting in December.

2020 Trek Powerfly – Preview

The Powerfly full suspension rig carries over for 2020, but the hard tail has been refreshed with some new options.

Details are relatively slim, but do know that select models have upgraded to the latest Bosch CX motor, saving weight. The big bonus, however, is that it allows for the use of a standard chainring size, rather than the small 15t ‘chainring’ that the older Bosch motor required.

All Powerfly hardtail models use a 120mm travel front fork, along with Trek’s variable wheel sizing – XS and Small bikes come with 27.5″ wheels, while Medium and larger use 29″ wheels. Maximum tire clearance is 27.5×2.6″ and 29×2.6″ respectively (also note that 29″ models may be used with 27.5″ wheels and up-to-2.8″ Plus tires).

Select markets also get an option for the Powerfly Sport, which is a commuter-focused option with integrated lights, fenders, kick stand, and rear rack.

Five sizes are available for the Powerfly, with key geometry listed above.

The Powerfly will be available in a very wide variety of builds (including women’s models), spec levels, and price points – varying by country. The US Market will only see the Powerfly 5 and Powerfly 5 Women’s for now, both at $4,199.

TrekBikes.com

2 COMMENTS

  1. “Complete bike weights have not been released to us as of this writing.”
    Bike weights are all listed on Trek’s website. Come on guys…

  2. That was an accurate statement when written. The weights were not in the press kit, and the product web pages for the new bikes weren’t available to us before this article published. We asked for the weights from Trek in an e-mail, but did not receive a response. We can only use what’s available to us.

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