LOOK Cycle announced a new track-specific version of their Keo Blade Carbon Ceramic pedal. With improved stiffness and a new control roller for cleat retention, they’re said to offer all of the security you’re used to from straps, in a lighter, more aerodynamic package.

LOOK Cycle Keo Blade Carbon Ceramic Track Edition pedals

While the Keo Blade Carbon Ceramic pedal isn’t entirely new, the special Track Edition is. Launched with their T20 track bike for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, the new pedal claims to offer all of the reassuring, secure feeling you love about traditional track pedals (with straps), but with greatly improved power transfer.

The basic DNA of the pedal is similar to the non-track version, but LOOK reports that a special control roller adjusts the pedal opening, and also triggers the release of your cleat/shoe in the event of a fall.

LOOK says that the complete weight for pedals and cleats is 15% less than pedals with straps – and they’re more aerodynamic.

The Track Edition pedals are compatible with either the standard Keo cleat (left), or Keo Grip cleat (right). You can get your hands on a pair now for €249.90

LookCycle.com

6 comments

  1. Seraph on

    Would be nice to have a report on the level of retention. Sounds to me like Look is claiming that these are stronger than their regular 20nm Keo Blades.

    Reply
    • Robin on

      20nm Keo Blades would have to be the smallest pedals ever; however 20 N∙m Keo Blades are probably within our technological reach.

      Sorry. I couldn’t help myself.

      Reply
      • Seraph on

        Newton metres are abbreviated as “nm” on many bicycle components across the industry. But thanks for being that guy who always has to make a point where there wasn’t one before.

        Reply
        • EcoRacer on

          Well, he is right though. Nm (Newton meter) and nm (nanometer) are two different things. Not to be confused with nM (nanoMolar) and NM (Nautical Mile). The capital letters are important, even though it was clearly obvious what you meant. 🙂

          Reply
        • Robin on

          Mine was a tongue-in-cheek comment. With that said, nm is a horrible thing to do units. Alas, some industries aren’t as careful with units as they should be.

          Reply
          • Robin on

            …using nm to mean Nm is a horrible thing to do… Such unit sloppiness is how Spinal Tap ended up with such small Stonehenge stones.

            Reply

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