Carbon wheel maker Venn reshapes their mid-depth, filament wound Var TCD rim with a new profile, adding just 2mm in depth for significant aerodynamic gains. The new Venn Var 37 TCD rim is optimized for modern wider road tires. But with a 21mm internal tubeless bead and the unique benefits of the continuous wound fibers, it can cross over to gravel riding, too.

Venn Var 37 TCD filament-wound aero tubeless carbon road rim

Venn Var 37 TCD filament-wound aero tubeless carbon road rim

c. Venn

We’ve been keeping tabs on Venn’s filament wound for about five years now, having tested their original Var 35 TCD (Tubeless Carbon Disc) wheels back in 2016. A lot has changed since those first gen wheels, namely wider 21mm internal hooked tubeless-ready profiles that do well from traditional road to all-road, to even a good bit of gravel biking as well. But while the previous Var 35 TCD was versatile, its blunt U-shape wasn’t very aero in changing wind conditions. So Venn went back to the drawing board for the new Var 37 TCD.

What’s new in the  Var 37 TCD? Tech details

Venn Var 37 TCD filament-wound aero tubeless carbon road rim

The new rim is 2mm deeper and 2mm narrower for an updated 37mm deep & 28mm wide profile. Its sides are a bit flatter, but still with a blunt nose and the same 21mm internal. It also keeps hooked, tubeless-ready beads, bead-lock shoulders, and a wide inner channel to make mounting tubeless clinchers easy.

Venn Var 37 TCD filament-wound aero tubeless carbon road rim

The reshaped rim is still made from continuous, machine wound towpreg, pre-impregnated carbon fiber filament tape, laid up through two 45° opposing computer controlled heads. Venn says this construction creates rims that are “laterally very stiff” and “remain vertically compliant”. The new 37mm rim adds about 30g to a claimed 450g per rim for its slightly deeper profile. The rims are available in 24 hole drilling only, and built-up have a rider weight limit of 110kg.

Var 37 TCD Improved aerodynamics

Venn Var 37 TCD filament-wound aero tubeless carbon road rim

The real benefit through is the aero gains of the refined rim shape, a shortened adaptation of their 50.7mm deep Rev 507 TCD profile. Designed for reduced drag with a 28mm road tire, the new Var 37 profile actually outperforms Venn’s own 45mm deep rim across all yaw angles, and greatly reduces drag over their 35 & 45mm deep rims once the wind shifts more out to a crosswind condition.

Venn Var 37 TCD – Pricing & availability

Venn Var 37 TCD filament-wound aero tubeless carbon road rim

The new Var 37 TCD is available on its own for $398 / 450€ per rim (up $28 / 25€), or as part of Venn’s custom wheel builder tool where complete wheelset pricing starts around $951 / 1077€ (€ pricing including VAT) and climbs as fast as you add fancy hubs & spokes. The new rims are available now, direct from Venn.

Venn-cycling.com

13 comments

  1. gmagee on

    Once again, wheel builders demonstrating that they do not actually understand the effects of wheel drag on vehicle drag. Comparatively little power is dissipated by drag at the elevation of the axle compared to that near the top of the wheel. Still, seems everyone focus is on this nearly insignificant location. Thus, all this wind tunnel drag force measurement while strapping the wheel to the ground is nearly useless. See US 10,502,656 for an in-depth explanation. But then, the masses don’t get it either!

    Reply
    • Tom on

      Not sure you can draw that conclusion here, I saw nothing to indicate that the wheel is stationary in the yaw test (though they did not mention a wind speed). I think the pics are chosen at mid line because they are pretty, but I presume they have a full CAD suite and run it from the top of the wheel to the bottom.

      Reply
    • Robin on

      I think what you’re really is that the masses aren’t flocking to buy your product. I think that’s indicative of you not understanding the market. People that want aero wheels care about the aero benefits and aesthetics. Thus, those people won’t be at all interested in your products. After all, your products aren’t exactly aesthetically pleasing.

      Other people in those masses, racers, use UCI approved stuff (for the most part), and given that, they won’t use your products. On top of that, those racers still would likely not be interested in your products given the unsightliness of your products.

      Lastly, it should be noted that the wheel manufacturers are doing what they can to minimize the drag of their wheels. It’s important to note that fenders aren’t typically considered wheels and as such aren’t typically made by wheel manufacturers. Perhaps you should direct the products of your venting spleen at fender manufacturers.

      “Strapping the wheel to the ground”: I’d like to see you prove that this is how aerodynamic testing of wheels is done. You can’t.

      Maybe should start a YouTube channel and challenge experts in the aero wheel industry to a debate. That’s what Flat Earthers do.

      Reply
  2. Velo Kitty on

    I doubt the bike industry pays high enough salaries to attract aero experts. That applies to engineer in other ares of bike design as well.

    Reply
    • Padrote on

      what is an “aero expert”? aerodynamic concepts as they relate to bicycle wheels aren’t all that complicated. it’s not like designing a fighter jet.

      Reply
      • C15 on

        It’s a lot more complex than a solid in linear movement. It’s a solid that spins AND move linearly. The top of the wheel move at twice the speed of the bike. You have two drags, the one to move forward and the one to spin the wheel. Most of the manufacturers do not look the rotational drag… so no it’s way more complex than many situation an aero engineer will face.

        Reply
        • Tom on

          if you believe Hambini, very few mfgs do a good job of this, spinning wheels are complicated, and sometimes the big brands don’t do so well. In contrast, some of the relatively unknown Chinese brands do quite well in his testing, which emphasizes unsteady flow aerodynamics.

          Reply
  3. Fred Gravelly on

    I love these threads, a bunch of bike nerds suddenly turn into “aero engineers” arguing semantics over marginal gains that may or may not exist…
    They did mention “lateral stiffness” & “vertical compliance” in the same paragraph so these might be some darn good wheels. They didn’t say if they work on gravel though…

    Reply

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