Deda Vinci steps up their hidden cabling and integrated cockpit game, bringing all the aero benefits of a one-piece road bar & stem combo, yet still retaining adjustability. Like the integrated Alanera that we saw a couple years back, this separate new road bike bar & stem get sleek looks and even sleeker cable routing, plus a new DCR headset that gives both that earlier Alanera and this new Vinci the option to keep routing completely internal from the bar all the way to the brakes & derailleurs.

Deda Elementi Vinci hidden cable aero bar & stem system

Deda Elementi Vinci integrated road bike cockpit, hidden internal cable routing separate aero handlebar stem DCR headset system, courtesy T and K Titanium bikes
c. T&K Titanium bikes (interesting in their own right!)

At first glance, it’s easy to mistake the new Deda Elementi Vinci cockpit for a more integrated setup. With no forward-facing stem bolts and the aero non-round profile shared by the bar & stem, it’s not immediately obvious that this is a fully adjustable combination that hides a regular 31.8mm round bar clamping area inside.

Deda Elementi Vinci semi-integrated road bike stem

Deda Elementi Vinci integrated road bike cockpit, hidden internal cable routing separate aero handlebar stem DCR headset system

But the trick is the shape of bar & stem are matching, but the clamping surface itself is still round. At the heart of it, the Deda Vinci stem is actually pretty conventional. But it just happens to be the first Deda stem to be designed to allow for a fully integrated, internal cable routing setup when used with the appropriate DCR bar & headset.

That works thanks to the standard opening at the bar clamp, plus a channel in front of the steerer tube where brake & shift housing can pass down into the special spacers before entering the headset.

Deda Elementi Vinci integrated road bike cockpit, hidden internal cable routing separate aero handlebar stem DCR headset system, courtesy T and K Titanium bikes

The -17° Vinci stem is 3D forged from 2014 alloy, and gets a 31.8mm bar clamp and 1.25″ steerer tube clamp, that also includes an adapter to fit more common 1.125″ steerers. It has a 40mm stack, including the upper DCR headset cap/spacer needed for the internal routing installation. Matching spacers for internal cable routing also come in 2.5, 5 & 10mm heights. The black stem with polished black graphics is available in 90-140mm lengths in 10mm increments, with a claimed weight of 190g (110mm).

Deda Elementi DCR headset for internal cable routing

Deda Elementi Vinci integrated road bike cockpit, hidden internal cable routing separate aero handlebar stem DCR headset system

To make the semi-integrated Vinci stem work with fully internal cable routing, you need the special DCR headset. The name comes from Deda Cable Routing, and allows for complete internal routing of up to 4 cables (mechanical or electronic shift, mechanical or hydraulic brakes) when combined with a Vinci or Alanera cockpit.

The DCR headset requires a headtube suitable for a straight 1.5″ steerer, which essentially means it needs internal headset bearing seats of about 52mm/2″, so the frame must be designed for this system from the start. Tapering that down to a 1 1/8″ tapered steerer tub on the fork allows room for the cables to enter the frame, before they would get routed directly into the inside of the downtube or into a hole into the inside of the fork steerer.

Special spacers are available that split open, so they can be added or removed to dial in fit without having to remove the internally routed cables (assuming enough cable slack and no need to cut the steerer.)

Deda Elementi Vinci semi-integrated road bike carbon handlebar

Deda Elementi Vinci integrated road bike cockpit, hidden internal cable routing separate aero handlebar stem DCR headset system

The Vinci stem and DCR headset can be set up with internal routing using many standard bars, but it is the carbon Vinci bar that completes the semi-integrated look perfectly. The secret there is that the tops of the bar share the same triangular profile that balances aerodynamics and ergonomics for a clean complete system look.

Deda Elementi Vinci integrated road bike cockpit, hidden internal cable routing separate aero handlebar stem DCR headset system

Closing out the space between bar top and stem are a couple of removable “handlebar foil” composite spacers – to complete the seamless integrated look. The idea here is that they can be removed to allow the use of Deda’s clip-on Superzero aero bars, or potentially other 31.8mm accessories. Of course the bar is compatible with internal cable routing, and has cable ports for Campagnolo EPS & Shimano Di2 controllers, as well.

The bar features:

  • 75mm reach
  • 130mm drop
  • available in 40, 42, 44 & 46cm widths

 

Deda Elementi Vinci integrated road bike cockpit, hidden internal cable routing separate aero handlebar stem DCR headset system

 

The 205g carbon bar (42cm) gets shaped drops as well in what Deda calls RHM – rapid hand movement – for improved comfort & control in all hand positions. Together with the Vinci stem it shares the same matte black finish, with gloss polished black detailing.

Deda Elementi Vinci integrated road bike cockpit, hidden internal cable routing separate aero handlebar stem DCR headset system

The Vinci bar & stem are designed & optimized for full internal cable routing when used with the DCR headset and a compatible bike frame. But for frames without compatible headset dimensions, you can still get the semi integrated look and feel, since the Vinci bar also includes more traditional cable routing ports on the underside of the bar to route cables conventionally to your frame.

Deda Vinci – Pricing & Availability

Deda Elementi Vinci integrated road bike cockpit, hidden internal cable routing separate aero handlebar stem DCR headset system

The new Deda Elementi Vinci setup is available now to build a clean road bike setup. The alloy Deda Vinci 73° stem retails for 110€ in six lengths. The UD carbon Deda Vinci aero handlebar retails for 260€ in four sizes. And the Deda DCR integrated headset sells for 50€. We’ve seen a few bikes already made for the internally routed setup, like the T&K titanium bikes above, and a new custom Italian steel bike we expect to be launched in the next week or so.

DedaElementi.com

14 COMMENTS

  1. Stack adjust ability is nice, but you still have to and disconnect brake lines and shift cables to change the stem length. I’d take the minimally exposed cables/hoses on the Orbea Orca OMX stem-and-headset system.

  2. Is the steerer tube centered in the headset bearing? At first I thought it was an offset steerer system like the Scott Addict RC, but now I’m not sure. Anyway, the frameset must be designed for the system, so this is not designed for consumers, unless they are getting a custom frame made. Also I don’t understand why Deda wouldn’t stick with 1 1/8 steerers as the goal is to get clearance between the steerer tube and inner bearing race in order to run the cables. Also, where does the front brake line enter the fork?

    • Lots of custom steel and ti frame builders use 44mm straight head tubes with the intent of the bottom having an external cup for 1.5″ and the top a ZS cup for 1-1/8″. They could probably just use two external cups instead, if they wanted to use this system. Not that I see much uptake on that exact situation…

    • @Velo Kitty There are a growing number of manufacturers building bikes with the 1.5″ headset bearings top and bottom and still using a tapered steerer tube on the fork. So this system is the same as FSA/Vision ACR system. The handlebars would even be interchangeable between the systems.

      The front brake line enters the fork in a hole in the front of the steerer tube inside the frame.

      • The FSA system is slightly different, for the Willier and Deda systems there is a hole drilled in the fork steerer tube near the bottom where the front brake hose enters and runs through the crown and down the fork leg.

        On the FSA ACR system there is no hole in the steerer and the hose goes through the expander bung at the top of the fork. The bung has a channel in it to allow the hose through. From there the hose follows the same path through the fork crown and down the fork leg. So on the FSA system the stem is a little taller to allow the brake hose to run into the steerer from the top.

        The Scott system is similar but the steerer is offset to allow the hose to enter the top of the steerer like the FSA system. The BMC system works the same but has a shaped steerer to allow the hose to run down. Ridley’s system is along those lines as well.

        All use a 1.5″ top and bottom bearing to gain the space needed.

        • FSA has since added a new design that is basically the same as this Deda design, the cables enter the top bearing in the same way (not like the ACR through the top of a taller ugly stem which was bulky and inconvenient). This Deda design is basically the same as many other bikes too, like Spesh Venge, Token, etc.

  3. I have these on my Wilier Zero SLR and love them! Wilier did not make a bar in the 40×120 that I needed and I gambled that these would work. They did beautifully!

    • Because of the pivot design of Madone, I highly doubt it. In fact I’m curious how Madone and Roubaix will “pick up” this trend of internal cable routing as their design inherently makes it impossible to have internal cable routing (not that I’m complaining, in fact I prefer to have it external for easier travel purposes, though I admit full internal makes it look sexy, I do say that Spesh way of doing it is the nicest of them all so far, a good balance of both)

    • Madone SLR does not use a round steerer, so no.

      Not a bad thing though… this dead bar/stem is objectively ugly. Trek’s execution on the carbon 2 piece bar and stem is excellent aesthetically and practically.love the subtle flare into the drops.

  4. will this work with the bianchi oltre xr4? i’m a bit confused as to who can use this bar/stem combo (aside from colnago as i’ve seen a picture of it on Gaviria’s bike)

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