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Zipp updates Service Course stems, seatposts with new options, better usability (updated)

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2015-Zipp-Service-Course-SL-OS-Stem-Expanded

Zipp has just announced an all-new collection of Service Course stems and seatposts, with both technical refinements and more fit options. The changes spread across both the standard and SL levels and carry with them fresh graphics, too.

For the stems, shapes are refined from prior models, and it’s more than just aesthetics. They claim small improvements in both stiffness-to-weight ratios and overall weight. Also, MSRP prices are a bit lower, too, helping fit them onto more bikes and into more budgets.

Above, the new Service Course SL OS comes with an oversized steerer tube clamp section for 1-1/4″ steerers. That gives Giant and Canyon bike owners another cockpit option, but it also gives the majority of riders more angle options to fine tune their fit. On the 1-1/4″ steerer it’s fixed at +/- 6º. But, using the included shims and adapters, anyone with a normal 1-1/8″ steerer can now get +/- 4º, 6º or 8º angles.

UPDATED: Comparison to 2014 models added and small corrections made.

But that’s not the only new option…

2015-Zipp-Service-Course-Stem-25-degree-angle

On the standard Service Course stem, you’ll get a new +/-25º stem to go along with the usual 6º option. Slam that stem and achieve a whole new low, and it even gets a new 60mm length on all standard versions to accommodate the shortest of riders.

The SL models have 6º and 17º options, same as before.

2015-Zipp-Service-Course-Stem

The SL series gets two color options: gloss black with white logos or matte black with black logos. The standard series gets this bead blasted black with laser etched graphics. All will match up with their corresponding handlebars.

2015-Zipp-Service-Course-comparison-to-2014

On a few items, the actual weight goes up a bit compared to the 2014 version, but the stiffness to weight ratio improves. And they’re still respectably light. For most items, though, the overall weight goes down. And the prices all go down, in some cases to almost half!

2015-Zipp-Service-Course-Seat-Posts

Seatposts are redesigned to enable better bolt access, making saddle installation and adjustments easier. The SL shown on left in 27.2 with 20mm offset, all others are standard Service Course, from left to right: 27.2/0mm, 27.2/20mm, 31.6/0mm and 31.6/20mm.

OFFICIAL SPECS

Zipp Service Course SL-OS Stem

– All new ±6° stem that fits 1-1/4 inch steerer tubes
– Lightweight and stiff with a 1.73g/nm stiffness to weight ratio for better control and responsiveness.
– More fit options. For bikes with 1-1/8 inch steerer tubes, included shims allow stem to be adjusted for ±4° ±6° or ±8° angles.
– Available in 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130 mm lengths.
– 140g (100mm)
– High-polished Black with Silver Laser-Etched Graphics
– MSRP $130/€112/£96
– Retail availability March 2015

Zipp Service Course SL Stem

– Redesigned shape results in lightweight and a pro-ready 1.85 g/nm.
– Available in ±6° and ±17° angles and 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130 and (for ±6° stem only) 140mm.
– 125g (100mm)
– MSRP $110/€103/£88
– Retail availability February 2015

Zipp Service Course SL Seatpost

– Lightweight while providing security and precise fit. Designed for easy tool access for fast and easy setup.
– Available in 27.2 or 31.6mm diameters. Fits all common saddle rail types.
– 220g (0mm offset), 235g (20mm offset)
– MSRP $115/€97/£83
– Retail availability February 2015

Zipp Service Course Stem

– New shape for improved stiffness-to-weight ratio 1.75g/nm.
– More fit options with ±6° stem with a new 60 mm length along with 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120,130 mm lengths. New ±25° stem available in 75, 90, 105, 120 mm.
– 150g (100mm)
– MSRP $55/€52/£44
– Retail availability February 2015

Zipp Service Course Seatpost

– Lightweight and designed for easier tool access for fast and easy setup.
– Available in 27.2 or 31.6mm diameters. Fits all common saddle rail types.
– 245g (0mm offset), 270g (20mm offset)
– MSRP $55/€47/£40
– Retail availability February 2015

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17 Comments
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Matt
Matt
8 years ago

When did specialized sell their stem to Zipp?

Mark
Mark
8 years ago

Several manufacturers have done the shim-able stem besides Specialized. That being said, I’m not a fan- increased stem height, lopsided stem (when not precisely installed), and an odd-fitting topcap if you don’t use the provided one.

Terry
Terry
8 years ago

1-1/4″ steerers? is that the new standard?

miles
miles
8 years ago

all they had to do is get rid of the stupid torx bolts! *sigh* maybe next time?

Ventruck
Ventruck
8 years ago

I took an early order of the SC SL, and from I recall it was delayed by a month because it didn’t meet their stiffness standards yet. New model’s wider and beefier clamp kinda resembles the 3T ARX, which is a pretty solid item so I wouldn’t be surprised if stiffness actually went up. I had no gripes about Torx, but the bit they supplied with my stem sucked.

Aesthetically they’re taking a step back imo. I was liking the look of the seatpost, too, even though it was a bit heavy.

Dave B
Dave B
8 years ago

Torx bolts aren’t “stupid”, they are secure and less likely to be rounded out than standard hex bolts.

Scoobie
Scoobie
8 years ago

You guys who don’t like the torx bolts know you can replace them with a “standard” bolt, right?

mudrock
mudrock
8 years ago

Greater adjustability, “future proof” design, mellower graphics – all good imo. Surprised they didn’t go to 35mm bar clamp, unless Deda owns that, if that’s possible.

greg
greg
8 years ago

Aesthetically, it would be nice if the face plate shape blended more smoothly with the stem shape. Looks like two different people designed it, and the stem extension and face plate are made by different people, with different materials. Also reminds me a bit of the older Truvativ stems. I applaud the wider bolt spacing though and cheaper standard part price.

ifbikes
ifbikes
8 years ago

As a giant rider, and zipp bar fan, I am excited about this.

Ck
Ck
8 years ago

Nice, another option for those riding Giant bikes with that silly Overdrive 2 standard. Graphics are a bit boring, but that’s not much to complain about. Certainly no room to complain about Torx, it’s just a flat out better choice.

Velociraptor
Velociraptor
8 years ago

I would take their specs with a grain of salt. I have a 2012 Zipp Service Course seatpost, and it weighs over 300g.

Wow
Wow
8 years ago

Scoobie

Its easier for them to troll br reviews then replace the bolts!

mjw
mjw
8 years ago

DORX BITS!!!

Trendy
Trendy
8 years ago

Seriously can someone make a 1 1/4″ stem with some real negative drop. Giant head tubes are huge and I’m in need of a -17 or -20 degree stem.

Dillon
Dillon
8 years ago

Velociraptor – there is a significant weight difference between Service Course and Service Course SL. If ya buy the cheap stuff–it ain’t gonna be the lightest.

Everyone else: Torx is better because it is much less likely to strip out if you don’t fit your wrench in properly. But if you really feel the need to downgrade, go to your LBS and pick up a few.

Mark V
Mark V
8 years ago

Hear, hear! An actual -17 degree 1-1/4″ stem, please.

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