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Aper KOMpace Raises High-Pivot Suspension w/ Sliding Link

aper kompace enduro mountain bike
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A lot of brands have switched to high-pivot suspension designs lately, adding idler pulleys and more chain to gain improved rearward axle paths. But Greek upstart Aper Bikes is taking it a step further with a sliding linkage that raises higher throughout its travel.

closeup of aper kompace enduro mountain bike rising pivot suspension

The Aper KOMpace is a 160mm-travel enduro mountain bike with a high pivot design. What makes it unique is that the main pivot sits on a sliding shock mount, which replaces a lower linkage.

How Aper’s Rising Pivot suspension works

aper kompace enduro mountain bike rising pivot suspension design

Imagine a VPP design, but swap the lower link for a sliding element, and as it slides, it compresses the shock. When you hit a bump, the pivot slides up and back, giving the rear axle path about twice the rearward movement of other designs.

Aper says most high pivot designs have about 25mm rearward path before the arc starts moving straight up, then forward. Their Rising Pivot design, because the pivot point slides upward and backward with the impact, allows up to 45mm of rearward axle “travel”.

The claimed benefit is that the wheel moves backward with the obstacle as it rises over it, so the impact is less abrupt and doesn’t rob your momentum. So, more rearward movement should mean more momentum maintained.

closeup of aper kompace enduro mountain bike rising pivot suspension

The rising pivot slides on a heavy-duty rail system, and they include grease with it and say it’s easy to maintain lubrication.

All of the suspension’s motion is independent of the pedal position, which they say is another benefit because the rear axle is moving more in sync with the rearward movement of the front axle as the fork compresses. Thus, it keeps things balanced for a more neutral feeling.

Frame details & geometry

aper kompace enduro mountain bike being wheeled

The rear triangle is braced by a rocker link on the top tube, ensuring it moves vertically with minimal lateral flex or twisting. Both the front triangle and rear stays are made of CNC’d 7075 aluminum shells welded together into a hollow monocoque structure.

aper kompace enduro mountain bike geometry chart

A flip-chip lets you switch between 29er and 27.5″ rear wheels, but it’s designed around a 29er front wheel with 160-170mm forks.

Frames are available for pre-order now for €3,969 with a €500 discount if you book it before December 31, 2023.

Aper-Bikes.com

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WhateverBikes
3 months ago

Take a step back, and wonder how we got to the point that all that stuff is deemed necessary just to have some fun on two wheels.
Meanwhile I’ll be riding my 1994 full rigid 26″ mountain bike, and having a blast.

JBikes
JBikes
3 months ago
Reply to  WhateverBikes

I think some said that in 1994, and stated they’ll just be riding their 1965 schwinn collegiate

blahblahblah
blahblahblah
3 months ago
Reply to  JBikes

delivered

WhateverBikes
3 months ago
Reply to  JBikes

That sounds nice, but it’s not comparable.
Those Schwinn’s were cool, but could only handle a downhill, after being hauled up the mountain with a pickup truck, and just barely, because they needed constant overhauling and were not safe at all.
A 1994 mtb can ride up the hill, down the hill, and more, without needing much service, and in a safe way, and providing loads of fun while doing so.
Modern bikes are more capable, but at a price. Literally, because they cost more to buy, service and maintain, but also because in order to keep riding fun, trails had to get wilder and wilder, making it more dangerous (those better and ‘safer’ disc brakes do nothing for you if you go short on a gap jump). Add to that the need for bike park entry fees, the cost (and hassle) of knee and body protectors and full face helmets etc., and what have you won exactly?

Dockboy
Dockboy
3 months ago
Reply to  WhateverBikes

If your 1994 fully rigid bike cost $1000, it would be over $2000 today. Now we have better shifting, better brakes, suspension, and better, stronger wheels. I’ll ignore that geometry back then left a lot to be desired, since it isn’t more expensive to make a 68° head angle than a 72° one.

Nobody makes bikes quite like those any more, so a direct comparison is hard, but overall bike prices haven’t grown much faster than inflation, we just have new tech that many people really like.

WhateverBikes
3 months ago
Reply to  Dockboy

I already acknowledged current bikes are more capable. There’s no discussion there.
But ‘more capable’ does not equal ‘more fun’.
I have huge fun when I go riding, and I don’t need a bike park, a wild trail, protective gear, etc. for that. No worries about suspension settings, charging batteries and all that.

By the way, there certainly stil are brands that (still) make simple bikes. In fact, many gravel bikes are quite like those old bikes, and there’s a reason they are so popular.

JBikes
JBikes
3 months ago
Reply to  WhateverBikes

One can still choose to buy a rigid MTB or a hardtail or buy a used bike.

Those buying whatever can have fun on whatever terrain they desire. You seem to be confusing the purchase of this style bike and only having fun on it on terrain that you may not like riding. You also seem to state that your version of fun is what everyone wants and nobody should want more or be able to ride more.

Thankfully bikes are not a zero sum game and consumers have choice to use their money to meet their needs.

Doc Sarvis
Doc Sarvis
3 months ago

Where do you put the marble in?

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