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Campagnolo Super Record Power Meter spins HPPM Tech for Industry-Leading Accuracy

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset on Greg van Avermaat's BMC
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Two months ago we were the first to spot this new Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset in the wild – in the most surprising of all places – at the UCI Cyclo-Cross World Championships in Tábor, Czechia. And now the long-rumored, long-awaited Campy power meter is finally here. Those familiar with the SRM x Campagnolo power meter option will see a lot of similarities. But this new Campy HPPM crank has packed in new ​High Precision Power Measurement tech with more strain gauges than we are used to seeing, to deliver industry-leading accuracy at a lighter weight…

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset
(Photos/Campagnolo)

High Precision Power Measurement is how Campagnolo describes their new spider-based power meter. In fact, even though its arms clearly labeled it as a Campy Super Record crankset, the Italian component maker only ever directly refers to it as the Campagnolo HPPM power meter. That leans into the idea that they are focusing on the tech inside, more than updating their already expensive top-tier wireless road bike groupset.

What new tech is inside?

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset, force diagram

Now, what’s inside are 16 strain gauges arranged in 4 separate Wheatstone bridges and a 1 gyroscope. That’s so you get precise torque measurement accuracy throughout the full 360° pedaling. You get automatic accommodation for temperature changes. You also get high-frequency data sampling that measures angular velocity (cadence) every 5 milliseconds for smooth power curves (200x per second).

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset, Wheatstone bridge

Those Wheatstone bridges are a bit unique in that the most accurate in-arm power meters (E.g. Infocrank) tend to use 1 Wheatstone bridge per arm with 4 strain gauges to ensure accuracy & temperature compensation. The most accurate spider power meters (E.g. SRM) tend to have 1 or 2 Wheatstone bridges per arm with 4 strain gauges each to ensure accuracy. Campy has 4 Wheatstone bridges placed around the spider (presumably at each arm connecting to the chainrings) with 16 strain gauges in total.

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset, fast data sampling

The resulting power measurement accuracy is said to be +/-1% (max 4000W power measurement), making the Campagnolo HPPM on par with the top

Campy Super Record HPPM power meter crankset details

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset, detail

This complete Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset is said to weigh just 656g (172.5mm with 45/29T rings, bearings & crank bolt). That’s just 38g more than a standard Super Record crankset without a power meter. Or down a full 124g from 780g for the similar-looking SRM Campagnolo power meter with compact chainrings.

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset from the top

The Super Record HPPM crank keeps a narrow Q-factor of 148mm, up 2.5mm from standard SR cranks. (And still 17mm narrower at the BB axle with a 130.8mm U-factor to minimize crankarm rub). It uses the same new 4-bolt 121/88mm bolt circle diameter introduced with Campagnolo Super Record Wireless for the ultra-compact gearing that matches the latest 12-speed cassettes with 10T small cogs.

My Campy & Wireless compatibility

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset, My Campy 3.0 app

The latest version of the My Campy 3.0 app for iOS or Android lets you quickly calibrate the new power meter and check the battery charge status. The Campagnolo HPPM power meter has a claimed runtime of 5 weeks or 2500km on a single charge. It is recharged in 3 hours and 45 minutes via the same 2-prong magnetic USB cable as Super Record Wireless. And the li-po rechargeable battery inside can be replaced by Campagnolo.

The Campagnolo HPPM power meter is rated IP67 waterproof. It communicates via ANT+ & Bluetooth at 2.4GHz. Campagnolo certified it for use in North America, EU/UK, Australia, New Zealand & Japan.

What’s different than what we spotted at CX Worlds?

Campagnolo Super Record spider-based power meter prototype, Ryan Kamp Colnago G3-X, sneak peek, up close
(Photo/Cory Benson)

Interestingly, the obviously cyclocross race-ready prototypes that we spotted in February on Ryan Kamp gold Colnago G3X CX bikes were not exactly what we see here. Kamp’s prototypes all looked to include the new HPPM power meter spider. But they still were using the previous generation crankarms with the small bulge, still seen on current Record & Chorus carbon cranks. Kamp’s cranks also look to have the smaller diameter BB spindle of lower-tier cranks.

What is especially interesting though, is a new backside image that Campagnolo has provided of the new HPPM power meter reveals that the Super Record arms are fitted to the spider with a 4-toothed lockring. And appear to just be clocked with a hollow pin that lines up with that small external opening in the carbon crankarm. That suggests more crank arm options (and slightly lower pricing) will be an easy update to roll out in the future.

Campagnolo HPPM power meter – Pricing, options & availability

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset, out of the box

The new Campagnolo HPPM power meter crankset sells for $2449 / 2240€ fitted to a set of Super Record hollow UD carbon arms with an Ultra-Torque titanium axle and USB ceramic bearings. For that price, you pick from 170, 172.5, or 175mm arms and the latest SRW 45/29, 48/32, or 50/34T chainring combos. And you get the proprietary magnetic USB charging cable, that would also charge your Super Record Wireless derailleurs.

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset ridden by Greg van Avermaat on Paris-ROubaix cobblestones

A complete Super Record Wireless groupset was already going to cost you 5200€. Deleting the standard cranks would save ~$950/1000€, presumably tallying the cost of a complete Campagnolo Super Record Wireless build with a power meter up to around $6900/6440€. We’ve asked Campagnolo to confirm groupset pricing, and that the new HPPM power meter should be available to consumers starting today. We will update as soon as we receive confirmation.

Campagnolo Super Record HPPM power meter crankset ridden by Greg van Avermaat on Flanders cobbles

Lastly, remember that Super Record doesn’t seem to be very prominently listed in the Campagnolo HPPM naming. Read into that, what you want, but we couldn’t be entirely surprised to see an HPPM power meter spider pop up at other points in the range. Maybe on a slightly heavier, slightly less expensive set of Record or Chorus arms, or dare I say an off-road-ready Ekar HPPM power meter crank.

Campagnolo.com

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32 Comments
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Dann
Dann
19 days ago

2-peong magnetic USB cable

I, for one, welcome the new 2-peong standard as a giant leap forward

Andreas
Andreas
19 days ago

jury is still out on the look of that little hole next to the spindle

Rim Brake enjoyer
Rim Brake enjoyer
19 days ago

Surprised there is still such a market for stuff like this and SRM. Pricing is astronomical and I know plenty of cat 1s and pro racers who seem to be doing perfectly well with existing tech that is a fraction of the price and bulk. Can’t imagine a product like this making much sense for someone who isn’t competing in World Tour level racing and even there it’s kind of debatable.

Andreas
Andreas
19 days ago

I think the main point is the campy actually HAS a PM now. For many campy customers, I can imagine that is more important than whether the accuracy is best in class or in-line with the majority of the useful stuff.

Andreas
Andreas
19 days ago

I think the main point is that campy actually HAS a PM now. For many campy customers, I can imagine that is more important than whether the accuracy is best in class or in-line with the majority of the useful stuff.

Mr Pink
Mr Pink
19 days ago

They aren’t all that accurate though and don’t last anywhere close to as long as an SRM. SRM’s have lasted 2-3 seasons under Pro Tour teams and then end up in the hands of people who ride them 5-10 more years.

Truth of the matter is many Powermeters in the market loose accuracy fairly quickly and warranty rates are still high for SRM competitors. That’s what SRAM went with a throw away version integrated into the chainrings that the whole thing gets replaced when your chainrings need replacing.

Always cheaper to buy once.

Robin
Robin
19 days ago
Reply to  Mr Pink

That’s quite a generalization. Congratulations! No doubt you’ve heavily tested every PM out there to arrive at such an erudite conclusion. Is your data available publically?

Sevo
Sevo
18 days ago
Reply to  Robin

The poster isn’t generalizing and is sharing common knowledge amoungst folks who geek out over this stuff….typically coaches that have been around for awhile and seen 100s on various devices. I once spent 3 months talking to dealers/coaches who sold a lot of Powermeters for a market research project. SRM did have the best score for durability and longevity. The other brands had not only 30-50% return rate and in many cases easily a 3 week week wait on warranty returns. It was however double the price of a competitor

For the record, SRAM’s current line was not out at that time and while their system is built into the chainings I’ve heard it works well. I do not know much about their spindle based system. Stages was only a few years old at the time so wouldn’t be fair to say much as much has been improved i’ve heard from friends that use it…but it isn’t perfect. Good enough for most probably.

I’ve also known a few pro tour pros that while they may have to race on sponsors product, they train on an SRM they had saved from an old team bike. I’ve seen SRM’s that have been used by pro tour teams that have ended up being hand me down’s for others. For the record most everything on a pro tour bike gets replaced at least a couple times a season if not more, so the fact that an SRM could survive 3 seasons in some cases then be used by up and coming pros/experts is impressive. Does everyone need such? Need is a strong word, and while i am fascinating by power meters I don’t even use a HRM for my riding. I don’t ride the same bike each day so it’d be expensive to put them on my bikes anyway and i don’t want to be that serious. But if i started to get that serious, an SRM would be what id’ get as they maintain their value.

For some the budget options are HUGE leaps forward for training and better than a HRM. Know many folks that a stages works just fine for their level and the SRAM I’ve heard the same. Don’t know much anymore about garmin or 3III or such anymore. Much could have changed since I was looking into things so probably not fair to say the others are bad, but i can see where they’d also get that reputation as well.

End of the day, in my honest opinion, having the numbers to reference is a huge leap forward for most folks and those that adopt power training always make large leaps forward in fitness from where they started.

its’ like cars, you can buy a typical car that will last say 150k and it’ll do you right. Most people are just fine with such and swap well before then anyway. Some of those cars last longer if taken care of. But if you buy say a Land Cruiser, yes you’ll spend more than say an Explorer of Kia Santa Fe or something but you’ll have it to 500k easy. Some this fits, others the explorer works just fine.

Robin
Robin
18 days ago
Reply to  Sevo

Sorry, but second-hand information isn’t data. SRM is not empirically superior. And something costing less is not necessarily inferior.

Generalizations are just lazy thinking. It’s certainly not critical thinking.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
18 days ago
Reply to  Sevo

There isn’t a single vehicle on the market that’s likely to hit 500k miles. There are only anomalies that hit 500k miles with some computer more likely to have those anomalies. The same can be said with power meters. I know multiple people with over 150k miles on different brands of power meters. They’re most definitely the exception to the rule with each brand though

Rim Brake enjoyer
Rim Brake enjoyer
18 days ago
Reply to  Sevo

I have a Honda CR-V sold to my neighbor and now used by his son. It has 450,000 miles. Kia’s are bought by people who think you never have to change transmission fluid and that they can do 20,000 oil change intervals even though they drive 6 miles at a time.

Rim Brake enjoyer
Rim Brake enjoyer
19 days ago
Reply to  Mr Pink

I have a stages power meter that is 8 years old. I ride 10,000 miles a year and it’s still on the money benchmarked against an SRM. I also have PowerTap G2 made in 2011 on my bike that is on the trainer and it still works and is accurate in 2024. Raced at the front end of P/1/2 crits and road races using all of these meters sans issue.

Val
Val
18 days ago

LOL. You lost us at “I have a stages…”

Rim Brake enjoyer
Rim Brake enjoyer
18 days ago
Reply to  Val

Let me guess. You a cat 4?

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
18 days ago
Reply to  Mr Pink

There are plenty of very high mileage Quarks out there… I’m talking +150k miles.

Johannes
Johannes
19 days ago

Quality has it’s price.

Sevo
Sevo
18 days ago
Reply to  Johannes

Our throw away society in America doesn’t quite get that. Always cheaper to buy once.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
18 days ago
Reply to  Sevo

I’ve sold a LOT of SRMs to Americans. Many of them have bought them more than once

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
18 days ago

No world tour teams are using Campy this year. They’ll sell plenty of the Campy die hards though. Campy is doing better than it did 10yrs ago when they had a good 4-5 world tour teams on their gear, and as always, pros are riding a fraction of the equipment a company makes.

finsup
finsup
19 days ago

All 7 people who buy this must be extremely excited

Oliver
Oliver
19 days ago

SR WRL really was a beta product. They launched with the crank arms with molded inserts for strain gauges for PMs to fit into in future. Clearly they scrubbed that for this spider based option. The pricing of all of it, this crankset particularly, is obscene …

Sevo
Sevo
18 days ago
Reply to  Oliver

SRM’s 10 years ago could be $3k for the high end. This is cheaper and the price of beer has gone up considerably in that time. 🙂

Oliver
Oliver
18 days ago
Reply to  Sevo

SRM were still, just about, the best game in town 10 years ago. And it was more than 10 years ago they were that expensive. They’re an overpriced joke now … and since this is a re-clothed SRM, I wouldn’t expect too much from this re: accuracy, repeatability or reliability.

B Barber
B Barber
19 days ago

I love Campy and have ridden it for over 30 years.
But recent moves have made me start to pull away. I have a feeling in 10 years they won’t be around.
It’s been a great ride though

Large D
Large D
18 days ago
Reply to  B Barber

I have a box of brokern Ekar parts from six months of use that can attest they aren’t what they used to be. I had to switch drivetrain brands because I like to use my bike, not wait on warranty.

G-Bike
G-Bike
18 days ago
Reply to  B Barber

I agree, when a brand becomes stagnant and appears to only be holding on to his legacy while at the same time lacks innovation, it in my opinion will become obsolete…

A-Bike
A-Bike
18 days ago
Reply to  G-Bike

This comment comes across as very uniformed. ‘stagnant’ ‘holding on to his legacy’ ‘lacks innovation’. This is a company that jumped head first into gravel. (stagnant?!?) They’ve let go of their world tour pro racing commitments (hold to a legacy?!?) And have just released the most advanced, sophisticated, and accurate power meter on the market (lacks innovation?!?). Just look at what they’re doing and where they’re going and you’ll see how misinformed that comment is.

G-Bike
G-Bike
17 days ago
Reply to  A-Bike

My comments are my comments, sounds like you are holding on as well…

Sevo
Sevo
18 days ago
Reply to  B Barber

They’re actually doing better than they have in years. Also seem to recall they still make alloy wheels for Ferrari or Maserati….or both. Italians have a long view. Campy isn’t going anywhere.

tertius_decimus
tertius_decimus
18 days ago

Hey, cycling industry, how about coming to senses with pricing and stuff?

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
18 days ago

While I’ve always hated Campy, their sales are quite good relative to 15yrs ago. They were never for the masses, although the less than reliable Ekar has gotten a lot of people of different incomes using Campy…but it’s price competitive.

fitness
fitness
18 days ago

Did they take their styling cues from shimano entry level groups of 10 years ago? Woof

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