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Cane Creek Aurora Release Turns Helm & eeWings Green

cane creek aurora green fork and cranks
6 Comments

The latest limited edition colorway for Cane Creek is a Saran Texture finish in deep shades of green and bronze, colorshifting depending on light and angle. It comes on Helm MKII forks and eeWings titanium cranks. The painting process means each one is unique, and they’re available separately or together.

cane creek aurora green helm MKII suspension fork

The Helm MKII Aurora comes in 29er only, with 44mm offset and your choice of air or coil springs. It comes set at 160mm travel, but is easily user-adjustable from 100-160mm for air, and 130-160mm for coil. Claimed weights are 2,080g for air, 2,340g for coil. MSRP $1,099, available while supplies last.

cane creek aurora green eeWings titanium cranks

The eeWings Aurora come in 165mm and 170mm lengths for MTB and in 170mm and 172.5mm lengths for All-Road. They come with custom-cut clear vinyl to protect the finish, but it’s still paint (not anodized), so it will wear and chip over time. MSRP is $1,199, weights from 396g (all-road) and 400g (MTB).

CaneCreek.com

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Luis Hernandez
Luis Hernandez
5 months ago

Love it! But damn pricey!

Exodux
5 months ago

Why just 165mm and 170mm for mtb? most riders I know use 175mm cranks. I use 175mm on every genre of bike I ride mtb, gravel and road. I’ve tried the shorter crank fad before it became a fad…not a fan of the fad.

Seraph
Seraph
5 months ago
Reply to  Exodux

That’s funny, most riders I know on MTBs run 170 and 165mm cranks. 175mm cranks usually equal pedal strikes.

Exodux
5 months ago
Reply to  Seraph

I agree with running shorter cranks on long travel, mostly gravity feed bikes might be the ticket for some.
I used to race downhill and used 165mm cranks, but then back up to175mm cranks because I rode faster with them in the pedally sections of some DH courses in which I excelled at.
Even on my Turner RFX which has a notably low BB height, I use 175mm cranks. Yes, I may get more pedal strikes every once in a while, but the stuff I ride mostly, 10mm of crank length isn’t going to solve the pedal strike issue.
CC make the eeWings in 175mm, just wondering why they didn’t offer them in this finish.

T.S.
T.S.
5 months ago
Reply to  Exodux

The trend is toward shorter and shorter cranks even for taller riders. Apparently even pro tour road riders are trending significantly shorter due to new research. It could be like 810mm handlebars though, every pro seams to have slowly shifted back towards ~760mm, so in 5 years everyone could be back to 170 or 175. I have short legs so the proliferation of 165 cranks has been great for me.

Exodux
5 months ago
Reply to  T.S.

Is it really a trend? I would call it more of an experiment.
I haven’t heard of pro tour road riders going to anything shorter than 170mm cranks, with most still using 172.5’s. I still believe most world cup mtb riders are using 175’s. But whatever works for you, go for it.

The wide handle bar rage is simmering down a bit though. I still ride 800mm bars on my enduro bike and my new XC bike came with 760mm, which I’m thinking of trying 770mm or 780mm bars. I Although I didn;t think I’d like the wide bars, I actually got used to them and like them.

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