Clever Standard tire levers with bicycle chain quick link removal tool

Inventor Tomo Ichikawa, who last popped up here with his adjustable height headset spacers, is back with his new brand Clever Standard. Focusing (for now) on tire lever based tools, his first is a nifty combination of lever and quick link remover.

The levers are made of a strong injection molded ABS material and interlock to create a plier-like device. Slotted fork ends grab between the links while leaving room for the outer plates to slide past. Squeeze it and the quick link is compressed, letting it be removed and reused. Video below…

The levers are designed by Tomo in Japan, then machined in Japan of a super hard Swiss engineering plastic. Weight is just 60g per pair, measuring in at 130x20x20 millimeters when stacked together. The design and product are patented/patent pending. Future versions will be offered with integrated quick link storage and “one extra feature for fun”.

clever-standard-tire-lever-with-bicycle-chain-quick-link-remover-tool-1

They also work great as tire levers, using the connection slot as the spoke catch. It’s here that we should mention most (all, probably) quick link manufacturers state that their quick links are one-time use items, but we’ve all reused them time and again with no issues. Your results may vary and do so at your own risk.

The set is $18 for one, with packages of five sets for $50, and is available for pre-order to ship on December 7, 2016, through their online store.

CleverStandard.com

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25 Comments
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Nash
Nash
5 years ago

I dont question the tool but should you reuse this type of link? Not a part of the bike i would be skimping on.

AC
AC
5 years ago
Reply to  Nash

I reused one from SRAM on my SS. It then broke when I was climbing, while out of the saddle. I had a he11uva of lump on ankle where it connected with the crank arm. I don’t reuse links.

Drew (@IrrelevantD)
5 years ago
Reply to  Nash

While I’ve re-used one in a pinch, I generally keep a spare or two universal links in my saddle bag in case I break a link on my chain, or more recently… break my derailleur hanger and have to break my chain to ride home single speed.

The problem I’ve discovered is getting one of these things opened on the road without a tool SUCKS. It seems so simple, I’m actually kinda amazed that nobody came up with it sooner.

slackers
slackers
5 years ago

Agree, probably not usually something to reuse, but as a road/trail repair tool, pretty handy to “fix” a chain and get one back home.

beat_the_trail
beat_the_trail
5 years ago

I won’t use an old one on a new chain, but I’ll reuse one on an existing chain for it’s life cycle.

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
5 years ago
Reply to  beat_the_trail

Yeah, as beat_the_trail said, you don’t want to keep running the same link through multiple chains, but reusing them generally works fine if you need to take your chain off for some maintenance related activity. I know with the 11sp models, some manufacturers recommend against it, but for lower gear counts it’s fine, and even for 11sp it is approved on some models of chain.

Tim
Tim
5 years ago
Reply to  beat_the_trail

Yep, new chain = new link. Otherwise, reuse.

On my road bike I remove my chain for cleaning about every 700 miles or so (gotta love the Chain-L) and always reuse the quick link. I’ve gone 1000’s of miles on reused links, both SRAM and KMC, and have never had a problem. No link failures, no shifting issues. The only difference I can tell is that after a couple of remove/replace cycles you don’t need the tool to remove the link because the slot opens up just a tiny bit. The “click” when you stretch the chain to seat the pins in the link is just a bit easier.

SK
SK
5 years ago
Reply to  Tim

Totally agree. I’ve been doing the same for years (yes, years!) without any issues except the “click” you described. And I have also been using SRAM and KMC links (on Campagnolo chains).

SK
SK
5 years ago
Reply to  SK

P.S. And I climb A LOT.

andrew
andrew
5 years ago

I do tis all the time with pliers. You don’t need a special tool for this.

trhoppepsd
trhoppepsd
5 years ago
Reply to  andrew

I’m sure you carry those pliers with you on rides…

andrew
andrew
5 years ago
Reply to  trhoppepsd

No, but you can install a new link without a set.

Brian Pope
5 years ago
Reply to  andrew

yes, but many times a tool to get the old one off is a godsend. It is not about the install, it is removal.

HDManitoba
HDManitoba
5 years ago

I’ve never needed to remove the quick link to fix a chain while on a ride. I’ve needed to pull links out using a chain tool so I could put in the spare quick link from my tool kit into the chain to fix the chain.

I’ve also broken quick links while on a ride and needed a chain tool to push out a pin and push it back in to fix the chain when I didn’t have a new quick link in my too kit.

That’s not to say I will never need to remove a quick link while on a ride but in 20 years of quick link use I haven’t needed to do it yet.

toffee
toffee
5 years ago
Reply to  HDManitoba

I think your right, out on the trail/road chances of needing this tool are next to non existent. Better off with a chain tool and a spare quicklink.

Champs
Champs
5 years ago

To paraphrase a racier joke, anything is a bottle opener if you’re creative enough. The world doesn’t need that “extra feature for fun.”

Gatt
Gatt
5 years ago

Personally, after seeing the tripe that appears on crowd starters all too frequently…and actually gets enough funding to go through with the product then this I see as being a great multi function tool. I’d buy a set.

Skip
Skip
5 years ago

I have been reusing the links for years,( new chain new link is the rule) I use the link for the life of the chain. I do carry an old link in my tool bag just in case, I am sure it would get me home in a pinch.

Crash bandicoot
Crash bandicoot
5 years ago

Love the idea. Can someone please take my money and make a tire lever/bottle cap remover?

Chandler
Chandler
5 years ago

you guys are funny – I’ve reused quick links for SEASONS and could barely distinguish the multiple-bikes old one from one that had 2 weeks of use.

1111
5 years ago

“Future versions will be offered with integrated quick link storage…”

So rather than buy now, I should wait.

Loki
Loki
5 years ago

All this hatin’ on the quick link removal and we’ve missed the most important point – tire levers!
Real cyclists don’t use tire levers, might as well leave the spoke protector and reflectors on if you’re going to have tire levers where a fellow rider could see you using them!

Drew (@IrrelevantD)
5 years ago
Reply to  Loki

You’ve obviously never had a hole too big to seal in a tubeless tire and had to put a tube in it. Rolling standard clinchers… yea, I’d agree… levers are kinda pointless.

Loki
Loki
5 years ago

‘Twas merely a jest!