DripDrop ORS puts medical grade oral hydration into bottles everywhere

 

Whether you’re on a road bike, mountain bike, or doing any physical activity for that matter, hydration should be one of the many things considered when preparing. Getting around the brick-wall takes more than just water though. I’m personally a fan of eating solid food than drinking cals/carbs/protein/etc,  but every time I come across a new drinkable solution I have to give it a shot. DripDrop ORS (oral rehydration solution) has thrown their hat into the ring of sport drinks, only their blend claims to perform “as effectively as an IV drip”.

Get the details after the break…

photo c. DripDrop ORS

DripDrop ORS is a drink powder that matches the World Health Organization’s standards for oral rehydration solutions. It supplies 330 mg of sodium and 7 g of sugar for every 8 oz bottle (1/2 packet = 1 serving). It also has 170 mg of potassium and 9 g of total carbohydrates, plus it offers at most 35 calories per serving (berry flavor).

It’s formulated to absorb quickly thanks to its high low osmolality, which in laymen’s terms means the nutrients are absorbed through the digestive system more efficiently and makes it more quickly into the bloodstream.

We recently received their berry and lemon flavors to try, and upfront they balance flavor, sodium, and sugar well. At the recommended serving size, the taste screams berry/lemon and it has a mouth feel parallel to Gatorade. The 1 pack / 16 oz of water was a bit strong for me when on the bike, but during other sports, such as hockey, it was great. Overall, it was refreshing on long rides and didn’t cause any gastrointestinal distress. The serving size wasn’t a magic bullet for me, but that’s all up to the user. Currently, 4 sticks go for $10, 12 for $29, 24 at $54, or 100 for $213. They’re also offering a subscription service that will send a monthly shipment of either 12 or 4 stick count packages at a 20% savings. Subscription prices are $23 per 12 stick count and $8 per 4 stick count.

DripDrop.com

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josh
josh
5 years ago

sweet, glad to have another over priced electrolyte mix with citric acid and sugar in the market, but its legit because its backed by “science”

Darth Baller
Darth Baller
5 years ago

…claims to perform “as effectively as an IV drip”. That’s nice, but does anyone know if it comes in morphine flavor?

Eric
Eric
5 years ago

“Medical grade” is about as stupid as “aerospace grade.”

Pete
Pete
5 years ago

Not sure you understand the chemistry or human physiology behind sports hydration. Drinking a high osmolality (or high concentration) solution will draw water from the body’s bloodstream into the small intestine. So it actually dehydrates you. This typically causes upset stomach or “gut rot”. It’s not a good thing all around.

A slightly hypertonic solution is the best according to most literature.

Gisolfi, C. V., Lambert, G. P., & Summers, R. W. (2001). Intestinal fluid absorption during exercise: role of sport drink osmolality and [Na+]. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 33(6), 907-915.

Debbie
5 years ago

Hi, Debbie from DripDrop ORS. I wanted to clarify that Pete is correct — we are a LOW osmolarity product (not high as it states in the blog) and the reason that is important is that it shortens the time it takes to rehydrate. To put this in perspective — our level of osmolarity is 235 compared to most sports drinks which are 355. In this case, lower is better. Feel free to reach out with any other questions … debbie@dripdropors.com