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EB14: Roundup – Sweet Cargo Bikes, Curvy Commuters, Geared Carbon Penny Farthings & More!

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Hey Cycle has just two models, a men’s bike and this step-thru women’s bike, available with 1, 7 or 8 speeds. While the drivetrains may vary, the curvy lines, beautiful paint and color matched parts carry across entire range…and there are a lot of colors among them.

Check a few more options below, plus a wide variety of cargo bikes, commuters, city bikes and, yes, some more e-bikes…

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Not all of them are monotone, some mix contrasting hues to bring alive certain sections of the bike.

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They’re not just good looks, though. Included fenders and a full complement of rack mounts, disc brakes and chain guard ring round out the package.

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The Johnny Loco brand is mainly comprised of cruisers, but these Fietsen models have a twin seat and plenty of leg room for the little’uns.

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They come in several colors and can be decked out with lights and other accessories. The entire front cargo section turns to steer, keeping linkages and such to a minimum.

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If your passengers are a little bigger, the Maxpro pedicab can get them around in style. They’ve also got a full covered model, as well as a covered trailer.

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Sorry, all I can think of is Ghost Town’s club song from the 90’s, My Boo.

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The MC2 carbon penny farthing is the brain child of Che Jing, and it’s pretty wild.

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Not only does the front freewheel along, it can be flipped to create a type of recumbent. Check out BikeBiz’s article on it for more detail.

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The gearing makes it go a little quicker than you’d be able to if it were a 1:1 ratio.

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Equally wild looking is the Ncycle, a concept introduced in January 2013 that’s now real. It’s a folding bike that builds in hidden storage, integrated lights and speakers.

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As far as e-bikes go, it’s among the sleekest, with completely hidden batteries and motor. The belt drive and carbon wheels certainly don’t hurt, either. Check out their website here.

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In my last roundup, I had a Riese & Müller cargo e-bike and this photo ready to go separately. Turns out “Load” is actually the name of that model, not the brand behind this killer wooden crate. So, the bike here is also the R&M Load, except this one’s rolling out the party:

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Not a stag party, per se, but…

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Built in speakers bring the noise.

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And a cooler is powered by the battery for the motor. The mileage might get cut short a bit, but totally worth it.

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Heinzmann makes industrial hub motors for agricultural vehicles and four wheel electrical vehicles. They also make bicycle hub motors, but on this bike they put it in front of the rear wheel then ran a separate gear to left side of the hub. A chain connects that gear to the motor, which is powered by the rack-mounted battery pack.

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Front hub motors are also an option.

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Bernds mounted a motor to this folding, collapsing small-wheeled tandem.

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Supposing you wanna convert your own bike to an e-bike but don’t want to replace a wheel to slap a motor on it. Efreshed by Pendix puts the battery pack in a pretty little cylinder and the motor on your crankset.

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It does push the crank’s width out a bit, but it’ll mount on any standard bicycle frame to give a little boost to your legs. The dial on the top of the battery switches modes from Eco to Smart to Sport, changing the level of assist to suit your mood.

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15 Comments
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rlee
rlee
8 years ago

Ebikes are not bicycles. They are motorized.

Greg
Greg
8 years ago

Until the battery dies.

Neeta
8 years ago

E-bikes are excellent way for cargo. And these designs, are just incredible and creative !

Psi Squared
Psi Squared
8 years ago

With the pedals, it certainly looks like e-bikes are bicycles. They have pedals. Maybe I’m supposed to be upset about the name. Oh well.

Daniel
Daniel
8 years ago

You know what also has pedals? Mopeds. These are electric mopeds.

Gunnstein
Gunnstein
8 years ago

US-standard ebikes (700W?) are mopeds. EU pedelecs (250W) are (e-)bikes. Know the difference when discussing them. 250W is less than a what normally fit inexperienced cyclist can produce on his own, isn’t it? A feble or unfit person + 250W is still much less than what a fit, unpowered cyclist performs at. Pedelecs are fine on bike paths, 700W monstrosities with throttles are not.

RENAULT Patrick
8 years ago

Bonjour, puis-je avoir des infos complémentaires à celle-ci, son prix et aussi comment éventuellement s’en apprrovisionner.

James S
James S
8 years ago

According to Wikipedia, a 150lb person requires about 60W of power to go 9mph on flat ground. So I’d guess that 100W is a pretty good power output for commuting in general. Which makes 250W a very significant boost. Based on the e-bikes I’ve encountered, I think there is a pretty reasonable argument against their use on bike paths – they allow their owners to consistently maintain much higher speeds than your average cyclist. On the open road or in bike lanes, that might be okay. But mixed with pedestrians, roller bladers, little kids, and dogs like you often find on so-called bike paths, that is a recipe for disaster.

Gunnstein
Gunnstein
8 years ago

@James An EU pedelec cuts the motor once you pass 25 km/h, so no, they do not give you much higher speeds than your average cyclist. Uphill yes, but then the speeds are anyway so low that the speed difference is not a danger. Without the cutoff, I agree they should not be on bike paths (or anywhere – they are illegal vehicles in EU without it). With it, there is no problem.

Gunnstein
Gunnstein
8 years ago

@James I do agree that when you are doing more than 25 km/h, with or without a motor, you should consider being in the road rather than on a shared use “bike path”. Depending on the conditions of the road and the path, of course. In my experience 25-30 km/h is about the fastest you can go safely on a shared use path – less when passing pedestrians. (BTW, I don’t own or want a pedelec, but I have tried a few.)

anonymous
anonymous
8 years ago

@Gunnstein

“250W is less than a what normally fit inexperienced cyclist can produce on his own, isn’t it? A feble or unfit person + 250W is still much less than what a fit, unpowered cyclist performs at.”

Are you actually a cyclist, or are you just a delusional pro?

Gunnstein
Gunnstein
8 years ago

@anonymous I don’t have a wattmeter. Strava estimates that I can output over 400 watts in a climb, and I’m just a recreational cyclist. And I’ve read about the pros doing way over 1000 watts (or was it 1500?) at peak. (All numbers may be way, way off for all I know.)

jinknobat
jinknobat
8 years ago

If any less than 100% of the power is coming from the rider, its not a bicycle any more as far as I’m concerned. If you want to use an assist or e-bike or whatever for cargo bikes thats fine, but they are totally different experiences. I’m cool with e-bikes everywhere except mountain bike trails. But it is not a bicycle.

Gunnstein
Gunnstein
8 years ago

@jinknobat So… if you have a tailwind, you’re not on a bicycle 😛 But seriously, wouldn’t you let handicapped (severe astma, fatigue syndrome, whatever) riders ebike on your trail? On 250W bikes, which I assume tear up the trail less than pro riders do?

Jesse Edwards
Jesse Edwards
8 years ago

The Hey cycles look amazing. As much as I love the colour, though, I think the rear rim and fender should be fully reflective.

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